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8

It depends on what you mean by wisdom. By wisdom, if you mean intelligence as well, it can be dangerous and cruel. ex: coming up with more effective ways to invade countries, deceive people to make more profit etc. But wisdom from a Buddhist perspective can be seen as two fold. Worldly wisdom: Wisdom that helps you live a successful family life, be an ...


6

In the Theravada tradition, we learn Yoniso Manasikhara. It means paying wise attention. And the knowledge or vision gained by paying wise attention is called the Yathā Bhūta ñāna Dassana or the vision of manifestations in their real form.


6

I wouldn't say cruel, but I certainly would say cold. The path to enilghtenment is divided in 4 stages. Before reaching each stage there is a progression of the insight that is similar in structure in all of the stages, and culminates with the attainement of the next stage. A simplified description of this progression of insight is that it is divided in ...


5

I don't remember which teacher or even which tradition I've heard this from, but I definitely remember some Buddhist teacher specifically advising to focus on "that sheep that fell far behind". This wasn't about skills per se, he didn't mean we should keep picking up skills like skydiving, motocross, crocheting etc - and other such ones that we are "bad at"....


4

I can't say "..." it would ruin the dialogue and also I'm supposed to support the users perspective. Some personal counsellors ask questions, along the lines of, "And how do you feel about that?" Maybe that's similar to Vipasanna's asking people to note their feelings. Maybe that turns people's attention inward (not "my partner is wrong" but "I'm feeling ...


4

Improving Sati-Sampajañña is actually right samadhi. When you want to improve "every day life situations", then you do Sati-Sampajañña. this is exactly the purpose of Sati-Sampajañña: sorting thoughts and perceptions-feelings in the casual life, when you eat, drive a car and talk to people, before being physically secluded to do the jhanas... Sati-...


4

If you have a child then when your child is happy you are automatically happy, and that happiness you experience is 100% without holding back, that is because your love and compassion for your child is unconditional. The same type of happy feeling you must get if your thoughts are pure towards others happiness. Jealousy is the reason why you cannot feel ...


4

Probably this: Sallatha Sutta: The Arrow (SN 36.6) The Blessed One said, "When touched with a feeling of pain, the uninstructed run-of-the-mill person sorrows, grieves, & laments, beats his breast, becomes distraught. So he feels two pains, physical & mental. Just as if they were to shoot a man with an arrow and, right afterward, were to shoot ...


3

In the Ayacana Sutta (SN 6.1), the Buddha explained that for the masses who are strongly clinging to sensual pleasures and other things like name, fame, wealth, health, relationships etc., it is hard to understand the full depth and breadth of the Dhamma. Then, while he was alone and in seclusion, this line of thinking arose in his awareness: "This ...


3

Bringing up anything specifically Buddhism-related would probably be inappropriate, but I suppose you could try and teach them along the lines of the Noble Eightfold Path (just don't call it so): First, they need to establish the right ground: that the problem is fixable, not unfixable. That they can make it worse, or they can make it better. If they ...


3

This job gives a lot of opportunity to put wisdom and compassion into practice. In average, I am in contract with about 5000 people every year. All of them in need of help and support one way or the other. You are very lucky. Being rightly motivated this can be a great opportunity to help others as well as make merit for your self. In my personal life, ...


3

Although the notion appears in all sorts of philosophical treatises, as well as in tenets, it is explained at length in texts expounding 'buddha nature' (tathagatagarbha). I would recommend in particular the study of Maitreya's Uttaratantra Shastra (Treatise on the Sublime Continuum). Although it is called 'uttara-tantra' it is included within the ...


3

In Mahayana, intelligence and wisdom are not used interchangeably. Wisdom has various meanings, depending on the context. The issue is that different Tibetan words are translated 'wisdom.' I assume these Tibetan words correspond to different Sanskrit words as well. In the Abhidharma, it says: QUESTION: What is wisdom (shes rab)? RESPONSE: It ...


3

If Tanha(craving) is caused by Avijja(ignorance) and if Avijja is sustained by Tanha, the cycle cannot be broken using Avijja and Tanha. But that doesn't mean it cannot be broken using something that is not a link of the Paticca-samuppada(Dependant Origination). Panna(wisdom) or within this context Vijja(non-ignorance) is the opposite of Avijja. It takes out ...


3

You have the one final chance to ask one thing. What would it be? That was Bahiya's problem in Udana 1.10 (quoted below). Bahiya, the advanced ascetic who was not enlightened, sought to understand in a short teaching the gist of the Dhamma that would free him. This question would be like "What would be the shortest summary of the Buddha's teachings that is ...


3

No, not exactly. I'm all for sati and silā, and while this cultivation is conducive to Samādhi, creates a beneficial environment for Samādhi, there is no direct linkage. This is why people who spend all their time following rules, regulations, and rituals have lost the art of developing Samādhi. Or why asexuals are not closer to Samādhi. Samādhi arises when ...


3

OP: How can I be happy at other's happiness ? How can I develop my willingness to see others' being happy ? One of the Brahmavihārās meditation subjects is Muditā which is to develop delight at other's well being. Muditā develops happiness at other's happiness. OP: Sometimes, I do loving-kindness meditation. But I'm looking for some kind of understanding ...


3

If you read the Vedanta page on Wikipedia, you will find this info: Vedanta or Uttara Mīmāṃsā is one of the six (āstika) schools of Hindu philosophy. Some of the better known sub-traditions of Vedanta include: Advaita Darshan - established by Adi Shankara (788–820 CE) Vishishtadvaita Darshan - established by Ramanujacharya (1017–1137 CE) ...


3

Prajna is direct practical realization of Buddha-Dharma. It is when you 1) clearly see in front of your nose (and everywhere around you) all that cool stuff being spoken about in Buddhist books, and 2) have attained actual hands-on mastery of these theories and principles in your own day-to-day life. Another way to say the above, Prajna is when 1) you ...


2

There is an answer to all of these issues in the Vinaya. Vinaya is the Monastic Discipline (code of ethics to be obeyed). In other words Vinaya is the disciplinary code of monks and nuns. For you and I, lay disciples, it is the 5 -8 precepts. Sadly in the present day Vinaya is not given a due prominence. That’s why many are not in a position to realize the ...


2

Am I wrong or is "beginner's mind" a Zen term that means "seeing the experience you are aware of, moment by moment, as if you have never experienced concepts before... Like you have just been born with a mind that has not developed concepts yet and so you see things as they really are? Yes, this is wrong because it has already jumped ahead into the ...


2

My dear friend in Dhamma, @UUU… I sincerely hope that you try to understand what I write. Both you and I have a lot of un-learning to do. Today a relatively small group of dhamma farers are seeing dhamma in a new light, practicing it and getting very favourable results. I joined such a group, a month ago, and experienced the same. I was able to go to the ...


2

My question is, can true wisdom ever be devoid of compassion? No Or would true wisdom by it's nature necessarily contain compassion? Yes In other words, is the risk of developing a cold, cruel wisdom a real possibility? Yes but within Early Buddhism there is less of a chance since the very first training--which comes before the training in wisdom--...


2

In Buddhism, wisdom means discerning suffering & freedom from suffering (SN 48.10). Therefore, self-compassion certainly arises from true wisdom; just as faith in the Buddhism path for the purpose of self-compassion arises from the wisdom of discerning suffering (SN 12.23). Faith, monks, also has a supporting condition, I say, it does not lack a ...


2

🌐 (1) Does self-compassion arise from wisdom? Yes! And out of compassion for all others. An all included wisdom & compassion. ➱ 1th stage of wisdom, serious honesty: 🔲 Rājan Sutta: The King I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Sāvatthī at Jeta's Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika's monastery. And on that occasion King ...


2

As a mental faculty, wisdom is one thing. It is the capacity to discern how things contribute to suffering or, otherwise, contribute to freedom from suffering. The suttas say: And what is the faculty of wisdom? There is the case where a monk, a disciple of the noble ones, is discerning, endowed with discernment of arising & passing away — noble, ...


2

In Buddhism, wisdom or special wisdom or omniscience, is direct and deep understanding of principle (principles?) behind all phenomena. In one sense, this wisdom is universal and applies to all problems and situations. This, however, does not mean that Buddha would necessarily know how to change the tire or pilot a helicopter without training.


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