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Buddhist master, Ajahn Brahm, answered a similar question as follows in an interview with Rachael Kohn: Rachael Kohn: I know that your message is often about happiness, and how the point of life...is all about changing one’s attitude, not really about changing the world. And yet you would know that that kind of an attitude can also be breeding a ...


11

Buddhist not trying to accumulate money/power and use it to help people and change world, is hypocritical? Hypocrisy is defined as: 1. a pretense of having a virtuous character, moral or religious beliefs or principles, etc., that one does not really possess. (source) So, the above behaviour would only be considered hypocritical if the Buddhist in ...


6

The self proclaimed Arahant, Daniel Ingram & his book "Mastering the Core Teachings of the Buddha" is probably where the "hardcore" thing came from because the book covers supposedly "hardcore" and hard to find teachings like the "stages of insight" that are rarely covered in books. Dan seems very angry & ridiculous in certain rants in the book, I ...


5

(Theravada) Buddhism is absolutely utilitarian... that's a pun, see, it's both absolute and utilitarian. I guess the more accurate contrast is moral absolutism and consequentialism (of which utilitarianism is a type). In Buddhism (again, Theravada, at least), it is certainly the consequences of the action that are important, though only for the actor - the ...


5

Since I am old, this happens with some frequency. A single wordless look with metta, eye-to-eye, is all that is needed. If a hug would be welcomed (and only if it would be welcomed), then it can be offered. Talk only when spoken to and respond briefly, simply and kindly. An offer to help is always appreciated, however. If the person is distant, the ...


5

You have strayed from the direct path free from [reified concept of] intrinsic being, and wandered down the wrong path of strict rationalism. And as you apply yourself to the labors of your own imagination, the obstructions to the correct path mount ever higher. What do you derive from this constant accumulation of words? ~Candrakirti, as quoted in "The ...


4

This is a very complex question. You start by positing an "ideal Buddhist", which cannot really exist by virtue of all Buddhists generally being human, thus flawed. You are asking about how a Buddhist goes about reducing suffering in others - or put the other way, acting on the kindness and compassion that they practice will, hopefully, bring into being. ...


4

We do not have to wonder about the answer to the question of "How would Buddhist monks organize countries, world?" We have plenty of historical examples of just this. There is no need to speculate. In Tibet for example. "Until 1959... around 98% of the population was enslaved in serfdom. Drepung monastery, on the outskirts of Lhasa, was one of the world's ...


4

How and when did the name "Buddhism" appear? I'm not an expert, but here's what I found this evening: the article SCHOPENHAUER AND BUDDHISM by Peter Abelson says, When the tenets of Buddhism became known in Europe during the third and fourth decade of the nineteenth century ... and says that Schopenhauer referenced work by Isaak Jacob ...


4

Perhaps this question was inspired by my answer to another where I disparaged some western philosophical notions applied to Buddha Dharma. That was not helpful nor was it meaningful. I’m trying to sincerely answer these questions with a mind of generosity and the sincere wish to benefit others, but unfortunately I don’t always succeed. As to this question I ...


3

But I wondered can any buddhist theory or practice can ever be harmful to a human? Many people pratice certain techniques as Buddhist pratice. When you come across a pratice that someone says is a Buddhist pratice you should try to ascertain: is this actually the Buddhist pratice comparing it with the original words of the Buddha in record or have you ...


3

I live in a country where most people are either atheist or christian. Estimates are that between 0.4 and 1% of all people here call themselves a Buddhist. It's been my experience that there isn't a single agreed upon definition about when you can call yourself a Buddhist. Some people say you are a Buddhist if you consider yourself to be one, others say you ...


3

Assuming Uilium's answer is correct you can get a bit of a sense of what "hardcore" might mean by reading the book's Forward and Warning. He says he deliberately wrote it in his own voice, that some of what he writes (whole chapters of social commentary) "has a definite bite to it", and, "it is the unrestrained voice of one from a ...


3

It depends on the beliefs and ideas of the person that you have the intention to help. If the person belongs to a community that absolutely have fundamentalist beliefs that is not aligned with the nature of reality then just be with the person with your presence, give him/her a cup of tea etc. If the person you want to help has more moderate ideas and ...


3

Please see the sutta quote below of AN 7.51. The Buddha was neither alpha male, beta male, alpha female, beta female, androgynous, dominant or submissive (from a gender-identity perspective). Rather, he was unbound and free of all such binding gender identity views. He was not even self-identified as a human being - he was simply the Awakened One - also ...


3

There's some discussion of that here. Some answers quote references, which point out that the Buddha allowed footwear in the wilderness and take that as permission to adapt to the terrain. One says that some monks simply don't go outside at all. One says that the strict interpretation of the Vinaya can't easily be adapted to a hostile climate. One says ...


2

Having read his book, and with honesty having also reaped great benefits from it, I mainly associate hardcore Dharma with the words of Daniel M. Ingram (here a link to his personal website). His way of teaching may initially seem a bit blunt, but that's just it and if I can recall correctly, Daniel makes it clear he is aware of it and explains the reasons ...


2

I don't think I understand your question. It's simply an '-ism' made from what should be referred to as "Buddhadhamma". All schools agree that Buddha showed a way to nibbana which anybody can follow by critically understanding every step themselves. All schools also agree that their minute differences are mainly in the monastic rules and conduct which ...


2

How common is the term "lord" for Buddha? People use it about 150 times in posts on this site. Would the followers of any of the Buddhist traditions ask the Buddha, who gave the fire sermon, to choose them, or pluck them out? I don't think so (it implies there's a 'me' and implies that I'm not responsible for my own salvation). This is the closest I've ...


2

"Lord Buddha" is used all the time ". Translations from Pali would often use language from the Bible, at least in earlier translations. Sounds like appreciation to Lord Buddha for plucking one out of the fire of sensual desire. Many people asked to be taught the teachings in many ways, some misunderstood the teachings before they asked and some understood ...


2

The same is true for Mahayana traditions (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dharma_name) allthough exceptions are possible. So for example the German Mr. Nölke, since many years abbot Muhô in Antaiji, Japan, got the freedom by his predecessor to choose his own dharma name, which he then officially "received". Justification: as one could not choose its own name ...


2

I think that it would be more accurate to say not a "conservative backlash" but rather a "progressive backlash" against watered down pop-buddhism. The simple definition of "hardcore dharma" to my knowledge is that it is dharma that focuses on a sincere and effortful aspiration to develop the skills of generosity, compassion, ethical training, meditative ...


2

It would be arrogant to even imagine that I can give one piece of advice that would be applicable to all situations. But I guess I can present one idea I got out of my own mistakes in trying to help, and from the kindness of others who helped me when I was in trouble. Give them confidence. Give them a sense of certainty using as few words as practically ...


2

If you are still interested, you can check this: https://www.reddit.com/r/Meditation/comments/9dx45g/can_we_please_have_a_pinned_thread_with_all_the/e5qcic6/ It's a comment with about 15 benefits of meditation with links to scientific articles that state them as far as I understand.


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