11

Here is a physical problem: Knee injury from sitting postures without requisite hip flexibility. This applies to almost any floor-sitting posture, depending on the meditator's hip flexibility. This is based on my own experience injuring my knees in sitting meditation. The knee injury occurs when insufficient hip flexibility causes the knee joint to rotate ...


11

It is classified as sexual misconduct. According to the Cunda Kammaraputa Sutta: And how is one made impure in three ways by bodily action? There is the case where a certain person takes life, is a hunter, bloody-handed, devoted to killing & slaying, showing no mercy to living beings. He takes what is not given. He takes, in the manner of a ...


10

The answer to this question may also depend on the individual and how advanced they are in Buddhist practice. If a person is solid in faith and regular in practice and can truly be that good example for friends that may help lead those friends to the Dhamma that is one thing. If the individual is newer to Buddhism and the keeping of precepts and right speech ...


10

There are many different views on the 5th precept. I'll sum up the 3 main views that I've encountered most: 1. Theravada In this article Bikkhu Bodhi explains that The taking of intoxicants is defined as the volition leading to the bodily act of ingesting distilled or fermented intoxicants.[10] It can be committed only by one's own person (not by ...


10

I would like to answer this not from the perspective of a knowledgeable Buddhist, but from the perspective of someone who has been clean and sober for over 9 years. Disclaimer: I am a recent Buddhist and know very little about the mechanics or the theory of it all. I simply practice daily meditation with the intent of awakening someday in this lifetime (or ...


10

As a (roughly) beginner practitioner, who has had a share of problems as well, I feel I can contribute. Mostly, my answer would fall in line with Andrei. Presuming this is accurate, this sounds like someone who has some large internal stress, and is possibly using "enlightenment" as a defense for his actions, rather than letting actions spring from some ...


9

Healthy and fit body does not need to be seen as an attachment. If a monk took the Bodhisattva Vow, all his activities will be done with the wish to benefit others. A healthy body is actually a very useful tool if one wants to help other beings. During a long life free from illnesses one can do much more than during a short life with numerous visits to ...


8

Drinking alcohol (whisky) and eating meat was a part of Tantric empowerments that I was lucky to attend. Teachings on emptiness tell us that on the absolute level all things have no intrinsic existence, everything is perfect and pure as it is and has nothing to do with good or bad. Perceiving alcohol as poison is definitely useful but ultimately we should ...


8

Depression is not just a state of mind, it is also a chemical imbalance. And for various reasons (maybe genetical or other) this chemical imbalance will affect some peoples more than others. Therefore we should be careful not to respond by simply pointing logical and scholar facts and reasons that one "should not" be depressive. Having said that, there is ...


8

welcome! Generally, from Buddhism standpoint, meditation is not practiced for the sake of mystical experiences. In vipassana exercises, whatever sensation is felt, it's supposed to be observed, we are not supposed to be overwhelmed by it. In general, arbitrary sensations and imaginations are not to be stimulated. And as importantly, awareness should be ...


8

These practices are seeing just like any other sport that does not involve morally problematic activities like killing or hurting other beings: it's just a sport. I don't think power lifters et al. are seen as aggressive -- not like, say, bullfighting or any other blood sport. But things might be different for a buddhist body builder or power lifter. In ...


8

1. Is this behaviour justified for a person who is on the verge of enlightenment? From your explanations above it sounds like this person is very disturbed, not almost enlightened. You could be reading it wrong, but here I will go with the assumption that your observations are precise. Questions 2-6 From my perspective (Mahayana), such behavior is ...


7

There are two types of meditations - calm abiding (Tib.: Shine, Skr.: Shamata) and insight meditation (Tib.: Lhaktong, Skr.: Vipassana). The meditation of calm abiding directs mind towards one location to calm it and techniques involve focusing on an object (a stone or a Buddha form) or a formless breath. Practitioners learn not to follow one's thoughts ...


7

Things can go wrong in meditation. Some of the are as follows: If you are not equanimous, i.e., you are reacting to different situation thus creating negativity. This can accumulate to an extent this might be very dangerous. The basis of your meditation is greed, hatred or delusion. There are some techniques where the basis is this hence can easily go wrong....


7

"and later I regretted" -- remorse is a klesha, an obscuring emotion. Have you learned your lesson and decided what you will do differently now -- that's what matters for your growth, the constructive part, not the feeling of guilt which only weighs you down.


7

Am I condemned for being romantically involved with another man's wife? Condemned by... the community you live in? If this is unaccepted behavior, yes. by the law? If that was unlawful, yes. by Buddha? He is not here, so I highly doubt it. How is this seen in Buddhism? Short answer: it is seen as a "don't do it". If you did, it is seen as &...


7

Wholesome intent is important The Buddha learned archery as a kshatriya, but he didn't lose his compassion - see this story of when his cousin shot down a bird. Martial arts can connect one deeply with the body, but so can Yoga and Tai Chi. Buddhism and violence have a long history, not always nice Meditation was used to numb kamikaze pilots to commit ...


7

You don't need to have sex to be healthy and well. Otherwise, most Buddhist monks should be sick. Cheating breaks the 3rd precept. That is bad Karma for you. Whether your wife agrees or not, associating with prostitutes has many bad consequences. You and your family's reputation can be tarnished. Higher risk of catching diseases. Your wealth will decrease. ...


6

There are many interpretations of that precept. It makes sense to try to understand the spirit of the precepts, rather then the letter only. The precepts are not the arbitrary will of Buddha. They have a function. They protect us from bad karma. The point is to not get intoxicated. Intoxication leads to heedlessness. When we're intoxicated, we do not ...


6

First, how bad is "bad"? Second, what are your limits? Third, can you really help? Fourth, is walking away a form of help? Fifth, what does your need of "bad" people say about your path? First, how bad is "bad"? Does it mean people who are not as far along the path? Does it mean those who don't care for the dharma? Does it mean toxic people? Knowing ...


6

I wanted to include an addendum on to this part of kukkuripa's answer: A distinction is made between intoxication, where one’s clarity is compromised, and simply enjoying partaking of a substance. Alcohol is banned in Olympic shooting events as a performance enhancing drug. Alcohol in small doses helps the shooter remain calm under pressure, focused and ...


6

The Dalai Lama takes daily exercise, including walking on a treadmill if it's too wet to walk outside -- http://www.dalailama.com/biography/a-routine-day. It makes sense to me since given that this human life is very precious in that it gives us an opportunity for moving towards enlightenment, it follows that it's a good thing to keep the body alive for as ...


6

I've seen meditators of many different schools talking about the importance of not walking away from a "bad" sitting. All books I've read reflect this commitment. All monks I've heard too. Conversely, I never heard or read a single meditator to take this issue lightly as in "well, if you are not much up to it, sure, maybe some other day". There are ...


6

You start by saying, "I don't want to consult any doctor about my obsession". I suggest that what you want (and what you don't want) are part of the problem: and should not be considered as a reliable guide for what you ought to be doing. It is your using "what I want" as a guide that has led you into this situation, from which you find ...


6

It is ok(ethically) to do physical exercises even for the purpose of being attractive. Lay people are not expected to follow the rules of monks. Such conflicts occur mostly when you try to live a monk's life as a lay person. Is it clinging/attachment that motivates you for physical exercises? Absolutely! But it's similar to asking if it is ok to have love ...


6

An explanation (including the origin story) of this rule is given on pages 194 through 195 of The Buddhist Monastic Code II -- The Khandhaka Rules Translated & Explained by Thanissaro Bhikkhu. It says, Eczema covers a wide variety of skin diseases, differing from those included under “leprosy” in that they are not debilitating and do not ulcerate ...


6

i think it depends on the attitude and the frame of mind a care to keep in mind the fact that it's a business of maintaining fitness of a frail and mortal bag of bones and impurities may negate the tendency of the attachment to body and self-association with it to become stronger, which such type of activity in my opinion is prone to foster but if one IS a ...


5

My name is Thomas. I was a Zen Monk for 2 years! Physical exercise was a key part of my day and with many other of the monks and nuns.


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