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Our thoughts follow a chain of associations, one after another after another. Assuming you're not a robot you can insert a particular idea into the chain, at will. It's as if you say to yourself: "let's consider the sun" - and as you say it you make an effort to remember/imagine the sun's characteristic signs (nimitta). As you keep your attention ...


5

MN 20 is a good sutta where both terms nimitta and vitakka are used, and you can see where they overlap. https://lucid24.org/mn/mn020/index.html nimitta is more general purpose, lower on the raw sensory food chain, than vitakka. Vitakka is verbal thinking, for example, mentally saying to yourself, "am I happy or angry." (not speaking that verbal ...


4

Anything we strive to attain in life takes practice. Mastery signifies being able to perform not only in ideal circumstances, but amidst the chaos of everyday life. Ironically, one can become attached to the feeling of being (or striving to be) detached. This can become a serious obstacle if we start dividing practice opportunities into preferences. How do ...


4

Thank you for sharing this. I noticed you shared a similar question from 2019. Firstly, I want to say something about using concentration methods as a primary practice. This is not something I would advise. Quite simply, concentration methods as a primary practice can penetrate too deeply and too quickly. This leaves the practitioner in a compromising ...


4

Yes, you are missing the experience of jhana! All kidding aside (though to be fair, once you enter jhana, this will make a lot more sense), it's actually pretty simple. Jhana is absorption. Vitaka and vicara are unnecessary in the 2nd jhana on because one is fully locked into single-pointednesss. You essentially allow yourself to get sucked into the ...


3

Links to the most important suttas on meditation here: https://lucid24.org/misc/raft/index.html (disclosure: my website, most of the sutta translations derived from B. sujato). You'll want to start with SN 46.3, it shows the causal sequence of how 7 awakening factors leads to samadhi. SN 54.3 is the basic version explaining 16 steps of breath meditation. SN ...


3

There are no suttas that describe the specific technique of Goenka. However, a natural 'scanning' of the body (including awareness and dissolution of sankharas) will occur when Anapanasati or Kayagatasati are developed.


3

As you said, I think of vitakka as "directing the mind" (towards vicara). I suppose there's an element of "intention". Conversely I think of "nimitta" as being the "sign" -- a superficial characteristic -- by which something is recognised. If I try to remember what my Dad looked like, for example, I might remember a ...


2

I believe that many/most people understand the meaning of jhana incorrectly. Bhikkhu Kumara has written a book recently to address this. He is waiting on more feedback before allowing people to post the link publicly, but his arguments are extremely persuasive that Jhana in pali just means meditation. The psychedelic hindu/visuddhimagga "jhanic states&...


2

I’m often in confused stage because my mind says one thing while my heart says something else and my awareness is in total confused mode trying to interpret these two entities. It'll be difficult to discuss in more details without some concrete examples/instances of the above, for quite oftenly, what one's "heart wants" while one hasn't attained ...


2

It's not a waste of time. The Buddha, prior to his enlightenment, recalled entering and abiding in the first jhana as a little boy in his father's garden, under a rose-apple tree. The memory of that, inspired him many years later. No good practice is wasted. From MN 36: “I considered: ‘I recall that when my father the Sakyan was occupied, while I was ...


2

an example of a typical reaction would be bodily feelings of pain and reacting with aversion, anger, etc. Or feelings of bodily pleasure, and then the mind running off with thoughts of things from the past that the bodily pleasure reminded them of. what you describe is exactly what should happen if you're doing breath meditation correctly, or kaya-gata-sati ...


2

I agree with NeuroMax, sounds like you have developed a wall dividing your world in two separate halves. Your concentration practice turned into cultivation of separation. Now the other half is knocking on the wall. It is your own shadow. The only solution is to connect with it and become whole again.


2

If I explain anything, it is what you called "later interpretations". If I quote a short Sutta, it is what you called "modern methods"--rearrange Suttas' sequence by my own opinion. If I quote other Suttas' which is not Ananda's Sutta, people would say "this Sutta is new, not original." So, this is the long Sutta by Ananda, the ...


1

The other answers have offered good advice, opinions, and perspective. I want to bring up two things: The Buddha's father didn't want him to renounce The Buddha's parents themselves did not want the Buddha to become a monk. You might read up on that story: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Renunciation. There are varying accounts. I'm not clear on whether ...


1

This is a painful dilemma for all Indian sons with traditionally strong sense of responsibility towards parents. The problem becomes compounded by the fact that there are no support systems for old people in India. This was a very painful issue with me too but I was always clear that I had to take care of my parents. Secondly, monkhood is no guarantee for ...


1

Just giving my two cents. Being an Indian daughter myself I have had the same questions knowing it “is” my duty to serve them. This is supported by Buddha- we “have to” serve our parents and they are considered so deserving of respect that even a bhikku can beg for food for their parents. You can ask a teacher the question about “How to serve our parents?” ...


1

Tell them "I do not work from now on, and I'll live at the temple forever (as a layman)." Or don't tell anything, just leave them by tell them "I will take a trip". Then go to Pa-Auk meditation center in Burma to meditate the meditation as a layman. When the time gone by, they will allow you to renounce. And you may have get a trick to ...


1

Simply ask them, good householder son. To give permission or not, is up to your parents' choice and goodness. As for skillful desires to seek the holy life, one is wise not to wait and hesitate even some minutes as unskillful mind and doubts may quickly arise again and it's uncertain if it would be possible anymore tomorrow. So, best wishes and don't waste ...


1

You can meditate full-time for 12 months, as a layperson, somewhere. Possibly, after 12 months you will not enjoy full-time meditation and return home. However, if after 12 months of meditation you attain stream-entry or higher then you will have a liberated mind to help you consider your situation more clearly.


1

By means of Sila and Metta (right view), not feeding for ones sake, one gets rid of the Demons, good householder. For additional good inspiration: The demon and the Yakkha you should take care - Die Dämonen und Yakkhas


1

if you cease all drug and food use that are psychoactive and youre still experiencing painful habits or effects you should check out a qualified tibetan medicine practitioner they will clear anything up very effectively. also consider that language is by definition meaningless. the stronger it appears to possess meaning and harm the more one is confused ...


1

Most Buddhists don't know what mindfulness is therefore i cannot recall any good books about it except a short talk by Bhikkhu Buddhadasa called The Use of Dhamma. Pra Payutto wrote a lengthy book called Sammasati: An Exposition of Right Mindfulness however it contains errors, such as the following: It is attentive, as if keeping its eyes on each impression ...


1

adukkhamasukha vedana is neither painful nor pleasant feeling i.e. neutral feelings. The definition of the 3 feelings come in MN 44 and their relationships to the 3 underlying tendencies towards greed, repulsion and ignorance: “Pleasant feeling is pleasant when it remains and painful when it perishes. Painful feeling is painful when it remains and pleasant ...


1

There are many ways to start on a path of meditation and Goenka's described path & interpretation of the Buddha is just one. If you want to see serious benefits from Goenka's path, I highly recommend that you attend one of the 10 day meditation courses that are available worldwide. Until then, I will give you some additional context to Goenka's ...


1

Summarised in a phrase of this generation - "If you don't use it you lose it." In terms of this situation, 10 days of intense meditation will be beneficial for setting up a foundation for sporadic use in the future. When it comes to yourself, it would have to be in line with your cultivation goals, usage and path. Put it into the perspective of ...


1

Your situation is not unusual and you are not alone. In the terms of this meditation, it is an advanced technique which requires a wealth of self-understanding. Intentions are the motions, strings of the mind; emotions, of the heart and actions are of the body. When we mix them, the tangle becomes exceptional and control is lost entirely. Seperate and ...


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