11

I agree with Dhammadhatu in that the different meditations seem confusing when you don't know what it is all about. When you know the underlying principle, you know how these different meditations actually approach same thing from slightly different angle, and you see how they try to explain something that is hard to explain in words, and emphasize what ...


7

OP: S.N. Goenka says if you practice Vipassana, you must not practice any other technique (but, even more confusingly, he also teaches Anapana and Metta) What is said by Goenka is that you should choose one technique and stick to it. If you choose the technique he teachers you have to follow the instructions properly without adding or subtracting or mixing ...


5

Tilakkhana is Pali for "three lakṣaṇa". "Lakshana" means indication, symptom, attribute, feature, omen, that by which a thing is recognized. Anicca, dukkha, anatta are the three aspects of all dharmas or all phenomena. Dharmas have many different attributes or qualities, but these three are the subset of qualities that helps us let go of our simplified ...


5

Ven. Yuttadhammo, who was formerly a moderator of Buddhism.SE, heads the Sirimangalo International Meditation Centre in Ontario, Canada. He was a student of Ven. Ajaan Tong Sirimangalo. He teaches vipassana meditation, which is very beneficial. You can find his meditation e-books online: How to Meditate How to Meditate II The "How to Meditate" e-...


4

There are really just two aspects of meditations in Buddhism, as seen in Kimsuka Sutta: "Suppose, monk, that there were a royal frontier fortress with strong walls & ramparts and six gates. In it would be a wise, experienced, intelligent gatekeeper to keep out those he didn't know and to let in those he did. A swift pair of messengers, coming ...


3

I'm not familiar with Yuttadhammo Bhikku, but from a short look at his teaching I believe the key is that one should not be noting things; one should be noting mind movements. For instance, looking at the discussion of vipassana on his website, he says this: The Four Foundations of Mindfulness are: Body: Noting the body while prostrating, walking, ...


3

Vipassanā is the same as satipatthana bhavana. Essentially the practice is from Satipatthana Sutta and/or Anapanasati Sutta or similar Suttas are called Vipassanā as they help to see clearly the true nature of phenomena.


3

Sounds like the hinderances have been temporarily tamed to some degree. 💚Oneness as I experience it using metta, self investigation and mindfulness just means there doesn't nessasarily have to be a distinction made by us human beings between me and other, us and them, tree and it's background, hand and fingers, sky and ground, good and bad, out and in,...


3

Here's the canonical answer: In this way he dwells contemplating feelings in feelings internally, or dwells contemplating feelings in feelings externally, or dwells contemplating feelings in feelings [both] internally and externally; or dwells contemplating in feelings [their] nature of arising, or dwells contemplating in feelings [their] nature of ...


2

I have been thinking about this for a while as you meditate one gets experiences which are similar to those described in yoga texts. The yoga texts discuss energy centres and the flow of energy through them starting from the Muladhara. In Theravada Buddhism, all these experiences related to Kundalini are categorised into Piti. Also, there is no reference to ...


2

Thinking is of two kinds: 1. About the seen; smelled; tasted; felt with the body; or heard. 2. About 'thinking' itself In this sense thinking is one of the six and can model a representative expression of that which can be thought about, figuring out how things work, imagining and understanding how reality, which would be what the senses present, works ...


2

You are starting to observe things with more clarity, noting that there is nama and rupa (mind and body) and also noting an awareness of both. In other words, you are experiencing awareness (knowing, consciousness) as its own object, distinct from the sensations it accompanies. This is good. Continue sharpening your mindfulness. Maintain your continuous ...


2

The Buddhist practice revolves around 3 practices: development of morality and ethics with a view to developing control over the mind development of control over the mind with a view of developing wisdom through direct and empirical experience developing wisdom through direct and empirical experience There is no shame in doing any of the above. Regardless ...


2

The Noble 8 Fold Path is the practice up to Sotapanna. Source: Maha Cattarīsaka Sutta intorduction To go beyond Sotapanna one must add 2 more elements under liberation/release which are: right knowledge right freedom Maha Cattarīsaka Sutta


2

Doing an intensive course at a dedicated meditation centre is incomparably better than online learning, but doing an online course or something similar is actually better in my opinion as a first step. Often when people come to our centre having never practiced or having practiced a different tradition, they spend quite a bit of time becoming accustomed to ...


2

Maybe the simplest answer to this question is that a sotāpanna does experience the mind, whereas most people identify with the mind so strongly that they cannot experience it at all. They are immersed in their thoughts, emotions, and urges, and cannot effectively separate themselves from these mental conditions. Someone is sotāpanna when they have ...


2

The biggest difference is in their actions. Instead of acting impulsively (I want this / I hate this) they think: "will this get me deeper into Samsara or further out of Samsara?" Their every choice is like this. The second biggest difference is in their vision. Instead of thinking "this thing is so" / "this thing is not so" like the regular people blindly ...


2

OP: Simultaneous vipassana & samatha - in this version of the question (Yuga,naddha) Paṭipadā Sutta mention there are 4 types of practitioners: (1) “insight preceded by calm” - samatha,pubb’angama vipassanā (2) “calm preceded by insight” - vipassana,pubb’angama samatha (3) “calm coupled with insight” - samatha,vipassana,yuga.naddha (4) ...


2

Firstly one should know how to handle experiances. This is what Vipassana teaches you. Judging or reacting to sensation can lead to negative latent tendencies: (1) the latent tendency to lust reinforced by being attached to pleasant feelings; (2) the latent tendency to aversion reinforced by rejecting painful feelings; (3) the latent tendency ...


2

Just a shot in the dark as I am not sure how well it matches your description, but could it be this? https://studybuddhism.com/ That site used to have an older version that was decidedly less modern and had the feeling of a much older website, but it has been updated recently.


2

In my opinion, the linchpin teaching of Buddhism is the teaching of no-self. It is the pillar that holds the entire foundation, and once it falls, enlightenment is inevitable. You have made a very common jump in logic that will hold you until you free yourself. You have two contradicting beliefs that will never allow you to progress in your path to freedom ...


2

OP: Is my practice correct? Bit confused over my approach. Also I don't have a meditation teacher. The 6Rs seams like a valid technique to develop vitakka-vicāra. It is similar to: When, bhikshu, this samadhi has been cultivated, well cultivated by you, then you should train yourself thus: “I will dwell exertive, clearly aware, mindful, observing [...


2

The 6rs come from banthe Vimalaramsi who claims that craving means there is a physical contraction at the top of the head, more precisely the meninges, and letting go means relaxing this contraction, which is a unsual claim, but the 6rs themselves are harmless. Anyway the usual way to get into samadhi is through ''pāmojjaṃ'', ie joy, https://suttacentral....


2

I wonder if the difference has something to do with the permanent destruction (through vipassana bhavana) vs. the temporary destruction (through samatha bhavana) of the kilesas? Per the Pali dictionary, CetoVimutti and PannaVimutti carry different meanings depending on context (restricted sense versus highest sense). In the highest sense, both are on the ...


2

Meditation burnout is a thing. In buddhist terms one can consider it as one or many of the types of clinging/grasping, upadana: Bhikkhus, there are these four kinds of clinging. What four? Clinging to sensual pleasures, clinging to views, clinging to rules and observances, and clinging to a doctrine of self. https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn....


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