31

Very much not the case, so long as you don't engage in a No true Scotsman fallacy and say that they aren't really Buddhists unless they are also vegetarian. In some traditions it is common for a begging monk to eat whatever is put in their offering bowl, mixing it together first (see the interview with Achaan Chaa in Living Dharma). For laypeople the ...


13

Among my own school (Nyingma from Tibetan Buddhism), encouraging vegetarianism is a relatively recent trend, mostly grounded on the teachings of Patrul Rinpoche, who lived in the 19th century and was a vegetarian. Still, the main reason for encouraging his students to become vegetarians was mostly because he was often horrified at how teachers and self-...


10

Sounds like your realization of Emptiness is not complete. Evidently, there are still some leftover attachments in you, specifically attachment to Dharma. Have you read Choguyam Trungpa's work? "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism" comes to mind. Have you worked with live Zen teachers or with higher levels of Tantra? Integrating Samsara and Nirvana is not ...


9

Because buddhist morality is not about regulations and punishments for bad deeds. It's about the effect actions have on your well being, and others' well being. It's "medicinal morality", rather than "legalist morality". And what is bad for the mind's health is to act with malicious intentions. This perspective on morality is completely different from our ...


8

I've been told by someone close to me that my meditation and desire to let go are very threatening to her. She sees sense desires, ego and attachments as very natural and wholesome, and my way of life as a threat or a questionable choice at the very least. If you mind your own business, and you don't preach/push other people into your way of thinking, it's ...


7

The issue with this question is that it assumes that vegetarian food production does not kill animals. Farming causes many deaths due to deforestation, pesticides, weedicides, electric fences and other animal traps. It can also contribute to landslides which even cause human deaths. So when you buy meat from the supermarket, if you are responsible for the ...


7

Devadatta, a relative of the Buddha, at one point attempted to cause a schism in the sangha by asking the Buddha to implement 13 ascetic rules for all monks, one of those rules being vegetarianism. The Buddha in his wisdom decided against forcing these rules on all monks and instead stated that any monk who wished to take on these rules for their practice ...


6

I forgot where I heard this, because it has been many years ago: "One becomes a monk, not just to be vegetarian" You're not forced not to have meat, but if you decide to devote yourself and stay in a temple, meat isn't what is served daily. Other words, what if you sneaked out and have meat and get caught? At certain temple, they don't punish you by ...


5

Entire books have been written on the topic, "The Great Compassion" is a good one to start with-- it is written from the pro-vegetarian standpoint. Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese Buddhists are all vegetarians. This is in part because the Bodhisattva vows from the Brahma Net Sutra, which are the vows and precepts that replaced the Indian precepts, explicitly ...


5

I think the idea of sinful or not doesn't apply to Buddhism. There are only wholesome/skillful actions and unwholesome/unskillful actions. Karma = intention. As long as you are mindful of what you're doing and your intention is to prepare a meal for nourishment, instead of causing harm in any way, cracking an egg during the meal preparation doesn't seem ...


5

First of all, the Buddha didn't die from eating pork at least in the Theravada point of view. In fact, his last meal was sukara maddava, translated to English dug by pigs, a mushroom which still grows in India. Also, vegetarianism is not considered morally superior to eating meat in Theravada. The general guideline followed with regards to eating meat by ...


4

The key here is volition > fabrications. In Buddhism this one one of the main points to be focused on. Though demand means that animals will get killed to supply the demand, for the person consuming there is not volition to kill. If any body wants to take a step further and become vegetarian / vegan then it is up to the individual. Here volition to ...


4

Reading the article, the first half of it is directed to monks: Monks accept charity Monks don't pay for food (so they don't "contribute to the market") Monks shouldn't refuse meat (if lay people choose/prefer to give them meat) because that (monks expressing a dietary preference and refusing) would make the monks more difficult to support As for the ...


4

It's probably to do with the absence of tension. When you're relaxed, your voice tends to be lower. If you meditate or do yoga the voice naturaly goes in that direction. It's possible something similar happens when you eat very healthy and remove other kinds of tensions.


4

The best option would be to keep following the noble eightfold path and observe the different path factors and the 5 precepts. This way you have your side of the coin clean and you are not pushing or preaching to her in any way. If she get's angry when seeing you meditate then that is her own doing. The untrained mind does not see reality for what it is. ...


4

According to this article, Is the Dalai Lama a vegetarian? on a web site named "Reasonable Vegan", When the Dalai Lama fled Tibet in 1959 he took residence in India, the birthplace of the Buddha and a region with a rich tradition of vegetarianism. Here he adopted a vegetarian diet which he has described as being rich in milk and cream[2]. After 20 months ...


4

If you eat vegetables or grains, it can indirectly cause the death of animals like snails and earthworms, due to clearing of land, ploughing, pesticides, weeding etc. If you wear clothes made of cotton, it can indirectly cause the death of animals like snails and earthworms, due to clearing of land, ploughing, pesticides, weeding etc. If you use banknotes ...


4

My thought on this is that; Buddhist precepts are taught as one follows so that he or she would not feel or experience unwholesomeness. Having unwholesomeness mind could affect one's mind, therefore affect one's meditation and vipassana (seeing things clearly). I am myself a lay person who try to follow a good path in this life. Mostly now, I try my best ...


3

Eating meat is bad karma. So what if it's an intellectual or conceptual argument? When buying meat, you don't have volition to kill but you have volition to eat the flesh of an animal killed for you the end consumer. If you were a monk you would be breaking the monastic code. Are the first five precepts not conceptual, as well? Conceptual reality is a ...


3

From a Theravada Buddhist perspective one does not have to be a vegetarian since the first precept is not broken if one is buying meat from the e.g. the supermarket or if one is passively revieving food/meat e.g. at family dinners etc. The following conditions must all be met in order for the 1st precept to be broken: pano -- presence of a living ...


3

There is are few incidents mentioned in Buddhism about egg consuming leading to bad karma. Explanation - "How could eggs be bad" Recognition of life in Buddhism is not only walking talking life,it also includes potential life(like an egg).An egg is not a creature,true.But if correct conditions are given it turns to life,So it is potential life.And killing ...


3

Interview with HHDL on July 4, 2010 by New Delhi TV, in which His holiness answers the vegetarian question: Then about taking meat, there are some contradictions but in vinaya no prohibition in eating meat, so monks in Thailand, Burma, Sri Lanka, they take both veg and non veg food. One time I asked, discussed this subject with a monk from Sri Lanka ...


3

According to the Brahmanet Sutra you should not own any pets which typically eat meat, except dogs who guard your property. Part of the reason is that a bodhisattva should not be engaged in fostering the consumption of meat, which is not compassionate. However, I would also be concerned with the health of the animal on a vegetarian diet.


3

Just to be clear, not all Mahayana schools prescribe vegetarianism. It is widely understood that Buddha originally allowed meat, and for practical reasons in some regions of the world such as Tibet, meat is invariably more accessible than vegetables or grains. In Tibetan Buddhism, vegetarian diet can be prescribed as part of the purity catharsis practiced ...


2

Vegetarianism is mostly practiced in Mahayana Buddhism I believe. It's probably because of the Hindu and Jain influence. Theravada tradition follows the word of the Buddha. i.e. It's totally up to the food preference of the individual. Ironically, Devadatta is the one who demanded from the Buddha that all monks should be vegetarian. I believe Hitler was ...


2

This translation says, If a bhikkhu sees, hears or suspects that it has been killed for him, he may not eat it. This commentary says, Furthermore, even cooked fish or meat of an allowable kind is unallowable if the bhikkhu sees, hears, or suspects that the animal was killed specifically for the purpose of feeding bhikkhus. Both of these imply ...


2

I interpret this as a modern science question about nutritional completeness (so I don't see how adding "from a Buddhism perspective" changes the the nature of the question). Some lay Buddhists prefer to be vegetarian, in which case I could recommend Wikipedia's Vegetarian nutrition article as an introduction to the nutritional aspects of that choice. In ...


2

Looking more critically at karmic web is good, but the whole point is to reduce/diminish and ultimately end suffering, however it manifests in the world... That said, it doesn't hurt to look into where you get your cat food from, getting it from more ethical sources. We could go out and try and prevent every lion from eating a gazelle, but that would kill ...


2

I also understand that eating meat (something I admittedly still do myself) is frowned upon It depends on the tradition and personal beliefs. If you follow Theravada Buddhism, you wouldn't have any issue with feeding yourself or your cat with meat products. In Theravada Buddhism, the word of the Buddha is valued higher than personal opinions. So you or ...


2

As noted elsewhere, it's pretty much only Mahayana Buddhism (especially Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese Buddhism) where vegetarianism as an ideal is the norm. So I'm answering from that standpoint. The Upaseka Precepts Sutra* does have something to say about pets. They essentially promote divesting of your animals, specifically singles out carnivores as ...


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