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7

Your quoted text is from M.N. Selasutta, that buddha taught to selabrahmaṇa: aggihuttamukhā yaññā sāvittī chandaso mukham. Sacrifices have the agnihotra as foremost; of meter the foremost is the Sāvitrī So, buddha didn't taught veda. Buddha just use selabrahmaṇa's knowledge, veda, to teach him the last line: puññaṃ ākaṅkhamānānaṃ, saṅgho ve ...


6

The quotes may be real, but their translation is probably not. Sanskrit (and Pali) root "ved-" stands for gnosis, knowledge, understanding. The name of Vedas comes from the same root, they are supposed to be collections of (religious) knowledge. Using this coincidence, it looks like instead of translating the words such as vedehi, vedagu etc. as e.g. ...


6

In terms of general knowledge, it can be helpful to be familiar with the religions of the world on a basic level and there are many books which compare the world's religions in an easy format such as The Handy Religion Answer Book. Reading a book such as this gives an interesting glimpse into the vastness of the the world's religious traditions. Studying ...


6

These concepts all (with the exception of Dharma, which is sort of a Pan-Indian concept that's in all Indian religions) derive from the Shramanical tradition, which is a general term referring to those who became Śramaṇa (Samaṇa in Pali) which simply means an ascetic. These ascetics formed a parallel system of religious thought of both the Veidic religion ...


6

In his Great Minds of the Eastern tradition lecture series Grant Hardy identifies 6 orthodox schools of Indian philosophy (Samkhya, Yoga, Nyaya, Vaisheshik, Mimāṃsā, Vedanta). He also identified 3 heterodox schools Cārvāka (materialist) Jainism Buddhism The heterodox schools are those who reject the authority of the Vedas. So based on this then ...


5

From my reading it appears he didn't oppose Vedic religion though he dismissed the Brahmins of his times as being false Brahmins. In the brāhmaṇavagga of the aṅguttara nikāya 5. 20, and the Dhp. 26 the Buddha reframes what it means to be a Brahmin, to one who is pious, celibate, free of mental defilements etc. - namely all the qualities of an arhat or other ...


4

The Buddha disagreed with Vedic teaching in certain respects, but he wasn't opposed to everything. He rejected the idea that there was any sort of intrinsic value to people's Varna, or caste, and he rejected many of the teachings which had some Brahmins of the time had understood from the Vedas (For example, at the time of the Buddha, some Brahmins taught ...


4

Dyana meditation is basically keeping your focus on one object. Various forms of it can be found in many religions. There's nothing exceptional about it. Even christians/muslims praying to a God is a type of concentration meditation that could lead to the first Dyana. In that case, the object of focus is conceptual or fictional. In Buddhism also you can ...


4

Prior to the Buddha (born 563 or 480 BCE), was the historical Vedic religion (1750 - 500 BCE), followed by the shramanic movement (500 - 200 BCE), and the beginnings of the Upanishadic movement within Hinduism (500 - 200 BCE). Buddhism is also considered to be part of the shramanic movement. Vedanta came later as part of Classical Hinduism (200 BCE - 1100 CE)...


3

Since the Chandogya Upanishad was written a few hundred years before Gautama Buddha, there's no doubt that OM is older than the Buddha. It doesn't matter whether it's a hundred years older or a thousand years older. As far as I know, OM does not appear anywhere in the Pali suttas or the other Early Buddhist Texts. Also, Gautama Buddha himself had never used ...


3

It depends on the individual. I've heard several people say it would be too confusing or wasteful. The analogy offered in Advaita Hinduism is that it is far better to dig one deep well than several shallow wells. In my personal experience the opposite is true, much to the chagrin of some spiritual friends and family. We must each obey whatever is our ...


2

I am not Buddhist, but from what I have heard from them, my experiences are sufficiently applicable to be worth voicing here. I have found great value in studying religions that I do not necessarily believe in. I find it to be a very powerful way to learn from a culture that is very different from my own. In particular, I have found it very effective at ...


2

Regardless of the type of caste one is in, all have an equal opportunity to become enlightened. From the Gihi Sutta: In the same way, wherever one is born among human beings — noble warriors, brahmans, merchants, workers, outcastes, or scavengers — if one is tame, with good practices, righteous, consummate in virtue, a speaker of ...


2

There's the Milinda Panha. It records a dialogue between the Buddhist sage Nāgasena, and the Indo-Greek king Menandernda_Panha). English Translation available here. It's not considered a core text by all Buddhist disciplines, but it is one of the oldest surviving apologetic dialogues between Buddhism and Hinduism. Another interesting text is the Buddhist ...


2

Please refer to the Introduction to the Sutta Nipata given here - https://www.dhammatalks.org/suttas/KN/StNp/introduction.html The Three Vedas were ancient religious texts that constituted the core of the brahmanical education. A person who had memorized these texts was called an attainer-of-knowledge (vedagū) or a three-knowledge person (tevijja). The ...


2

Straight forward answer is Buddhism never accept caste system or the color. In "Wasala suthra" (as I remember the name) Lord Buddha has clearly mentioned that, a person doesn't become noble by his birth, caste etc but by his act (behavior). Vasala Sutta: Discourse on Outcasts (SN 1.7) Now at that time a fire was burning, and an offering was being ...


1

This excerpt from DN 13 may answer your question sufficiently. “Well, of the brahmins who are proficient in the three Vedas, Vāseṭṭha, is there even a single one who has seen Brahmā with their own eyes?” “No, Master Gotama.” “Well, has even a single one of their teachers seen Brahmā with their own eyes?” “No, Master Gotama.” “Well, has even a single one of ...


1

ॐ is from संस्कृतम् Sanskrit, which was likely written in some form from c.1500BC & earlier; it was used, or whats sometimes called a preVedic form, before The Mahabharata & RigVeda, c. 800BC or so. There were & are various styles of it and its the basis in more & lesser part for many languages in the world. Some scholars would consider some ...


1

Someone (I forget who -- Paul Carus perhaps) drew an analogy with Christianity -- saying that Buddhism is a reformation of Brahmanism, like Christianity is a reformation of Judaism. In my opinion, the doctrines might seem similar superficially, in that they inevitably have some words in common -- a common language or vocabulary, the vernacular. If ...


1

This may be a "lost in translation" issue. The term "alankar" usually refers to an instrument or ornament. It also refers to a ritual of rhythmic clapping in Tala. Since the Sutras are traditionally recited in rhythm, this might just be a reference to this practice of reciting the teachings. A modern-day equivalent would be "rap", referring to both the ...


1

In the Canki Sutta, the Buddha hints that even the learned brahmans themselves are unsure whether the Vedas are true, by their own empirical validation: "And among the brahman seers of the past, the creators of the hymns, the composers of the hymns — those ancient hymns, sung, repeated, & collected, which brahmans at present still sing, still ...


1

Check out the link : Why did Lord Buddha reject the Vedas? Excerpt from the above answer : In Sutta Nipat 192, Mahatma Buddha says that: Vidwa Cha Vedehi Samechcha Dhammam Na Uchchavacham Gachhati Bhooripanjo. People allow sense-organs to dominate and keep shuffling between high and low positions. But the scholar who understands Vedas ...


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