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A couple of dictionary translations: Bhagavā: venerable, fortunate, blessed, sublime. Generally designates the Buddha. Bhagavant (adj. n.) [cp. Vedic bhagavant, fr. bhaga] fortunate, illustrious, sublime, as Ep. and title "Lord." Thus applied to the Buddha (amhākaŋ Bh.) and his predecessors. Occurs with extreme frequency; of fanciful exegetic explns of ...


7

The quotes may be real, but their translation is probably not. Sanskrit (and Pali) root "ved-" stands for gnosis, knowledge, understanding. The name of Vedas comes from the same root, they are supposed to be collections of (religious) knowledge. Using this coincidence, it looks like instead of translating the words such as vedehi, vedagu etc. as e.g. ...


5

There are 3 types of wisdom suta-maya panna: wisdom gained by listening to others cinta-maya panna: intellectual, analytical understanding bhavana-maya panna: wisdom based on direct knowledge or meditative(Vipassana) wisdom Knowing here means the third type. When a monk preaches or when you read a sutta on your own you usually gain type 1 and type 2. ...


4

Bodhidharma is the legendary founder of Zen in China. He is said to have arrived in China about 520 CE. (Buddhism had by then been known in China for about 400 years.) He was soon summoned to the emperor, who had questions for him. "I have endowed hundreds of temples and monasteries, and endorsed the ordination of thousands of monks and nuns; what is ...


4

According to this wisdomlib.org page, "viveka" in Pali means: viveka : (m.) detachment; seclusion. (Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary Viveka, (fr. vi+vic) detachment, loneliness, separation, seclusion; “singleness” (of heart), discrimination (of thought) D. I, 37, 182; III, 222, 226, 283=S. IV, 191 (°ninna citta); S. I, ...


3

When a Sutra began with "佛说" (佛说譬喻经), it usually means remembering what Buddha said and retold by a third party. This a general understanding, but doesn't undermine the value of teaching contained in that Sutra. This 《佛说譬喻经》 only one page, translated by Yijing (635–713 CE), is collected in the Jātaka Section. Some scholars and Buddhists doubt the ...


3

‘Past life’ would be translated in Pali as ‘pubbe-jīv(it)am’ and ’re-birth’ would be ‘punna-jāti’, but I have not found either of these terms in a digital search of the whole Pali Tipitaka. The Buddha could have easily used those terms, if that's the meaning he wanted to give. So, to me, translating words with those meanings, is only interpretation and I ...


3

Before coming to the subject proper – rebirth – let me give you an introductory note on the first couple of links to rebirth (rebirth is part of the continuous process of change.) According to the Scriptures, tanha is craving. It is the chief root of suffering and of ever continuing cycle of rebirths. Dependant on tanha arises upadana (tanha paccaya ...


3

I think I know part of the source of the problem, you have "discovered". The words in the Suttas, especially the popular often-used words, have undergone a transformation, via the subsequent use by the Non-Buddhist sages. The presentations of the Hindus, Vedanta, etc., is markedly different. Also, if you want to check out a root source, I recommend a ...


3

According to Buddhism thought to arise from the consciousness. Which are called Vitakka and Vicara. There are many types of wholesome and unwholesome thoughts. A person should have a good grasp of Abhidhamma to understand the differences completely. Abhidhamma in practice: http://103.242.110.22/theravadins/English-articles/abhidhamma-in-practice.pdf


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How can we know the original meaning of a word with certainty? Yes. I'm sure there's a scholarly answer -- not this from me though. Your mentioning "chakras" reminds of something similar, i.e. the "chi" that we're taught in Tai Chi -- which I learned from, was taught by, a Chinese master. His English wasn't good, even with a translator I ...


3

When possible, the suttas give physical references for clarity: They’re like a flax flower that’s blue, with blue color, blue hue, and blue tint. Or a cloth from Bāraṇasī that’s smoothed on both sides, blue, with blue color, blue hue, and blue tint. --DN33 Note that the Buddha's blue is not our blue. However, the translation and understanding of ...


3

Please refer to the Introduction to the Sutta Nipata given here - https://www.dhammatalks.org/suttas/KN/StNp/introduction.html The Three Vedas were ancient religious texts that constituted the core of the brahmanical education. A person who had memorized these texts was called an attainer-of-knowledge (vedagū) or a three-knowledge person (tevijja). The ...


3

There's one here -- Dhammānussati: Svākkhāto bhagavatā dhammo: sandiṭṭhiko akāliko ehipassiko opaneyyiko paccattaṃ veditabbo viññūhī ti. The Dhamma is well declared by the Bhagavā: visible here and now, immediate, inviting to come and see, effective, to be individually ascertained by the wise. If you use a mouse to hover over one of the coloured words (of ...


2

I think they're related but not identical. I think the Sallatha Sutta can be paraphrased along the lines of, "physical sensations lead to feelings (I feel that I like this, or that I don't like this) which lead to attachment (I want this to continue, or I want this to stop)" -- which means that, now you have two problems, i.e. an unpleasant ...


2

Actually, it doesn't look like Tibetan, but rather like Sanskrit or Pali. It's a little hard to make out, but it could be part of the Prajna-Paramita (Heart) Sutra. Having said that, Buddhism (and especially Mahayana Buddhism from which this Sutra originates) has little to do with faith. As opposed to the Abrahamic religions depicted here, Mahayana Buddhism ...


2

Sabba - all pāpassa - of the evil/sin/ akaraṇam-non-doing kusalassa-of the wholesome upasampadā-acquiring/undertaking sacitta-own mind pariyodapanam-purification etam-this buddhāna-of the Buddhas sāsanam-teaching/dispensation Note that “assa” means ‘of the’ (genitive singular)


2

He is probably an anagarika. Anagarika, literally "homeless one", is a stage of practice between lay followers (upasaka) and novice monks (samanera). They usually wear white and act as part time or full time volunteers at monasteries or temples. They observe the Eight Precepts and are able to handle money unlike novice monks and fully ordained monks (...


2

If we're talking about translation, then those are very much the actual exact translations of the words that the Buddha used. If we're revising the wording beyond dictionary meanings, then we're not really talking about translation any more, but entering into realms of commentary and interpretive rendition. The terms themselves are pruṭhavī-dhātu ("earth"),...


2

I'm not an expert (please consider this instead as an "exercise for the student" for someone to correct). When it's used in a phrase like, "bhikkhūnaṃ etadahosi", isn't "bhikkhus" there in the plural genitive or plural dative case? Anyway, not nominative. So wouldn't you translate that as "of the bhikkhus", or, "to the bhikkhus"? You say you translate '...


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Possible source : The Buddha's Path To Deliverance ~ Nyanatiloka https://books.google.fr/books?id=TjDkBQAAQBAJ&pg=PA90&lpg=PA90&dq=manifoldness+nyanatiloka&source=bl&ots=OOSRkkkMWG&sig=1amC6GoSby-xpjiaImzTsE9bCpY&hl=fr&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiC4aeS6aHWAhVGPxoKHeFzBd8Q6AEIDzAC#v=onepage&q=manifoldness%20nyanatiloka&f=...


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In this context Samadhi stands for "meditation". So a better translation of that passage would be: Cultivate meditation, monks. One who meditates gets clear vision into the nature of things as they really are. Or as my teacher said, "in order to have clarity you need to sit". Here "as they really are" does not mean the raw appearance which Theravada ...


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I'm here burning the mid-night oil for the bounty!! :)))) Unfortunately I wasn't able to find the corresponding Agama Text, else it would be more clear, to me at least. However, Samadhi normally remained as "Samadhi" (三昧/三摩地) in Chinese, not translated, despite the rich knowledge of meditation inherited from the Daoist understanding what's going on in the ...


2

The word is "bhava" and in my understanding it refers to a particular state of individualized existence: "being a living being", "being a human", "being a person". So it's not about just the mathematical fact of existence, it is about your subjective position of identifying with this particular organism and its personal story, its narrative. So when Buddha ...


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