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5

Ultimately, Time exists only conceptually, i.e. as a mental formation. Thinking about past, present and future are mental events, happening in the present moment. We live only for one thought-moment at a time (momentary death). The mind might be chasing after some object or running away from another object but that also takes place in the present moment, ...


5

Cyclicality and Linearity are both alluded to in Buddhism. Essentially many beings are trapped in Samsara living their lives and doing similar things over and over through the aeons because they are chasing after the same endless desires and suffering the same afflictions. However, it is also linear in the fact that progress is possible, you can transcends ...


4

Understanding time is an important part of insight into the nature of things. How can you understand the empty nature of entities if you don't understand their relationship with time? How can you be free of self, of the dictate of the form, if you don't see beyond time? In traditional literature this topic is famously addressed by the founding father of ...


4

Maybe the term is "Tathata" that means "suchness" or "thusness". It is a Mahayana term. It means "Things as they are" or "reality". It's ultimate reality as opposed to conceptual reality. It comes from the word the Buddha used to describe himself," Tathagata" that means "one thus gone". In Chan stories, tathātā is often best revealed in the seemingly ...


3

You find references in: Tsongkhapa's Middle-Length Lam Rim Kamalshila's Stages of Meditation The Abhidharma. Je Tsongkhapa. Middle-Length Lam Rim: Indicating the length of sessions Is there an established length of meditation sessions, specified in terms of “The mind is tied to the object and placed for just this long?” The major texts such as ...


3

Buddhist philosophy of anatta challenges the notion of "entities" - objects with identity, independent of the rest of the world and observer. Instead, here is an alternative: try and see the world as a connected network of causation, with a system of nominal entities overlaid on top. In other words, consider that entity is a construct of the mind. (This ...


3

Lord Buddha definitely does talk about Past, Present and Future; but I guess your questions is mainly about, "Do we have something called time?" or "What is time?" With regards to Abidhamma, there is no "Paramartha" dhamma which we can relate to time: i.e. there is Citta, Cetasika and Rupa and Nirvana, but no reference to time. One of the best explanations ...


3

Meditate with timer is very rare in Theravada Buddhism. During meditation period, you might only need to focus on breath in and breath out. This time you do not need to hear, you do not feel pain, you do not need to be happy, you do not need to think about something, you do not need to think about the timer. This time you can feel everything is neutral. You ...


3

Use a timer for the following reasons. Worrying about whether your session is done is a distraction. A timer will free you from this. A resolution to sit for X minutes may not work. Even if the resolution does work, you could end up mistaking that for progress. Don't laugh -- people mistake side effects of practice for the goals of practice. They'll ask ...


3

There are two Pali words that seem relevant to this question: Kalika meaning "related to time" Akalika meaning "not related to time" There's a definition of the words here in this 'glossology': Akalika -- Timelessness, A synonym for Arahantship, An attribute of the Dhamma It suggests two meanings for kalika: Two events can be said to kalika when they are ...


3

If you are referring to the intellectual capability of memory (隨念智), then this is not mentioned in Bendowa. The whole-hearted way is, as you say, awareness from moment to moment. According to Zen, it is the experiential reality, not the memory or interpretation thereof (even if the memory is one of realization). The memory of a previous realization cannot ...


3

I recommend a few words: divāvihāra -- for example the page-long description of that here which starts ... an expression which ... I consider to correspond to the “day’s abiding”, divāvihāra, mentioned in MN 35 at MN I 229, 23, instead of intending a “heavenly abiding”. It's used in many suttas to indicate what monks do (or at least, where or when or ...


3

Meditation. Sometimes Buddha meditated just for the sake of it even after enlightenment.


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This answer might overlap with ChrisW's, but I just want to quote some examples from the suttas. The first activity is "day's abiding", which seems to be sitting down and resting or relaxing. From Udana 6.1: I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Vesālī at the Gabled Hall in the Great Forest. Then, early in the morning, ...


3

These are covered in the: 15 Wrong / Right Views 16 Doubts 108 thought-courses motivated by craving mentioned in this answer 15 Wrong / Right Views Let go of the past “How, bhikshus, does one pursue the past? (1) One seeks delight there, thinking: ‘I had such form in the past.’ (2) One seeks delight there, thinking: ‘I had such feeling in ...


2

To evaluate this question correctly, it is essential to look at the difference of Theravada and Mahayana, since answers given by people from these differing traditions are bound to be slightly different also. It appears to me, the four seals are a mahayanic equivalent to the (not-only) theravadic three marks of existence. Also the Theravada/Mahayana-...


2

Past is a conceptual construct that only seems solid in the absence of careful examination. But if you look closely you will see that Past is assembled by the mind from multiple cues (as is Present by the way). The experience of second-to-second flow of time is a byproduct of chitta-vrtti, the associative cycle, when each subsequent dharma (~thought) comes ...


2

We do not even keep our memories from moment to moment and day to day. Memories are relative. They have no intrinsic self and are impermanent. Certain memories change over time, or are covered with a lens of delusion. Other memories are completely fictional.


2

I have been using a meditation timer with great success (There are a number of meditation APPs you can leverage). I actually started with a 5 minute timer (every morning) and since have added a minute each week as I build up to 30 minutes. To me, it feels like slowly incrementing the length of meditation has kept me from internally clock watching. I'll ...


2

The reason that you don't see a lot of dialogue about time is that it is a difficult subject to get right at the best of times, and not really necessary to liberation. It might be considered nothing more than a cosmological inquiry, something to be avoided in favor of practice. However... All that which is compounded, conditioned, dependently arisen and ...


2

Am I right that for Buddhists, intervals don't exist (everything lasts only for an instant): so neither do events? Ultimate reality exists only as momentary experiences of the six senses, experienced one after another. In this way, there is no "interval", either for Buddhists or non-Buddhists. Conventionally speaking, Buddhists could employ the concept of ...


2

Not the Buddha, but these dictionary entries define akalika and kalika, and include these notes: Ñánavíra on Citta, see footnote: "The notion of two successive 'moments', A and B, as akálika or non-temporal is a confusion. Either A and B are simultaneous (as e.g. viññána and námarúpa), in which case they are indeed akálika; or B follows A and they are ...


2

Time is merely the concept humans use when trying to apprehend impermanence. Time is the measurement of the rate of change of things around us that are appreciable to the scale of which we experience reality. All conditioned things being unable to maintain a constant form, and thus being in constant flux, give the appearance of "time", but there is no time ...


2

I think this answer implies that (passage of) time depends on (two, separated in time) events. For example 'the time elapsed between today and tomorrow' depends on 'today' and on 'tomorrow'. Similarly maybe space (a.k.a. distance) depends on (two, separated in distance) objects. See also this topic which suggests that there have been conflicting opinions/...


2

The Buddha exclusively used the term 'dependent origination' to refer to twelve conditions that lead to suffering. Once you adhere to the Nagarjuna (Mahayana) view on 'dependent origination' (i.e., cause & effect or conditionality) there will be conflicts since conditionality & the idea of 'no inherent existence' is difficult to apply to all things. ...


2

The quote you give: The cognition of the ultimate nature of things—their all being empty of intrinsic nature—is nonconceptual because, there being nothing to cognize, no cognition arises. Refers to wisdom directly realizing emptiness. Such a wisdom realizes emptiness in a non-dualistic manner. It is non-conceptual and explicit, since it realizes its ...


2

Finally... let me try。。。 What is the use of discussing no-cognition as it defined as "the non-existence of a thing cannot be perceived by the senses for there is nothing with which the senses could come into contact in order to perceive the non-existence." wikipedia/Anupalabdhi It negates the negated, i.e., the non-existence, the cannot be perceived. This ...


2

In the Yamaka Sutta, Ven. Sariputta, made Yamaka to understand that the five skandas are anicca. If one truly understands this reality the extinction of the process happens in the form of ‘Nibbana’. If we willingly attach to these five skandas with the nicca sanna, then we suffer. Only in realizing that nothing can be maintained to one’s satisfaction in ...


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