6 votes

Cyclical time in Buddhism

Cyclicality and Linearity are both alluded to in Buddhism. Essentially many beings are trapped in Samsara living their lives and doing similar things over and over through the aeons because they are ...
Yinxu's user avatar
  • 1,705
5 votes

Time vs Impermanence

What is the connection between time and impermanence ? Are they different terms for the same thing ? The two are very different concepts. Time can be thought of as the conceptualization of ...
w33t's user avatar
  • 755
3 votes

Does Dogen's wholehearted way say anything about the status of memory?

If you are referring to the intellectual capability of memory (隨念智), then this is not mentioned in Bendowa. The whole-hearted way is, as you say, awareness from moment to moment. According to Zen, it ...
Codosaur's user avatar
  • 1,811
3 votes
Accepted

Buddhists advise against "me and mine" does that include times?

These are covered in the: 15 Wrong / Right Views 16 Doubts 108 thought-courses motivated by craving mentioned in this answer 15 Wrong / Right Views Let go of the past “How, bhikshus, does ...
Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena's user avatar
3 votes

What leisure activities did the Buddha partake in?

This answer might overlap with ChrisW's, but I just want to quote some examples from the suttas. The first activity is "day's abiding", which seems to be sitting down and resting or relaxing. From ...
ruben2020's user avatar
  • 37k
3 votes

What leisure activities did the Buddha partake in?

Meditation. Sometimes Buddha meditated just for the sake of it even after enlightenment.
RRR's user avatar
  • 492
3 votes
Accepted

What leisure activities did the Buddha partake in?

I recommend a few words: divāvihāra -- for example the page-long description of that here which starts ... an expression which ... I consider to correspond to the “day’s abiding”, divāvihāra, ...
ChrisW's user avatar
  • 46.5k
2 votes

Is time empty of inherent existence?

The Buddha exclusively used the term 'dependent origination' to refer to twelve conditions that lead to suffering. Once you adhere to the Nagarjuna (Mahayana) view on 'dependent origination' (i.e., ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.7k
2 votes

Do we have conventional knowledge of the present?

Finally... let me try。。。 What is the use of discussing no-cognition as it defined as "the non-existence of a thing cannot be perceived by the senses for there is nothing with which the senses could ...
Mishu 米殊's user avatar
  • 2,309
2 votes
Accepted

Do we have conventional knowledge of the present?

The quote you give: The cognition of the ultimate nature of things—their all being empty of intrinsic nature—is nonconceptual because, there being nothing to cognize, no cognition arises. ...
Tenzin Dorje's user avatar
  • 4,946
2 votes

Is Buddhism now lost until the birth of Matreiya Buddha?

Pure Dharma can be defined as clear, unmistaken explanation of the path all the way to complete awakening, endowed with Buddha's blessings. "Buddha's blessings" here mean that a teacher doesn't only ...
chang zhao's user avatar
  • 1,503
2 votes
Accepted

Why do Buddhists argue that nirvana is nothing in addition to the skandhas?

In the Yamaka Sutta, Ven. Sariputta, made Yamaka to understand that the five skandas are anicca. If one truly understands this reality the extinction of the process happens in the form of ‘Nibbana’. ...
Saptha Visuddhi's user avatar
2 votes

In the doctrine of no arising does the past and future still exist?

Dogen is saying that from Buddhist perspective, a dharma does not "become" another dharma. Each dharma is a "presence" at its time, static in its own quality, followed by another "presence-quality" ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58.3k
2 votes
Accepted

Supposing mahayana nirvana is permanent does it have substance?

Nothing that is substantial can be permanent. Only absences (including cessations) are permanent. This is Buddhism 101. In the Mahayana, Nirvana is the cessation (a permanent absence, never to ...
Konchog's user avatar
  • 582
2 votes

What is before spring?

This idea is elaborated in Dogen's work called "Uji" (The Time-Being). Here I will paste some bits and pieces: Time itself is being, and all being is time. Each moment is all being, is the ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58.3k
2 votes

What is the sutta where the Buddha says that one breath or one bite of food is the proper timeframe with which to contemplate life/death?

I found the sutta I was looking for: https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an06/an06.019.than.html It's AN 6.19.
Peter Charland's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

What is before spring?

Dogen is said to have said: Time itself is being, and all being is time. But what does “is” mean, and how does it help form the answer being searched for by the OP? In the question, the OP ...
StillJustJames's user avatar
1 vote

Momentariness, but birth and death?

I would say there were two ways of looking at this. You can't exist "for" an instant but you can exist "at" this instant. You are not living five minutes ago, or two hours in the ...
ThirdPrize's user avatar
1 vote

Proper meditation at hard times ( to be kind, open mind and enjoy hard times )

In Buddhism, a type of meditation to be used is called EQUANIMITY MEDITATION. Equanimity meditation is: "OTHERS ARE PERSONALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR THEIR ACTIONS". Often we want to help another person ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.7k
1 vote

In the doctrine of no arising does the past and future still exist?

The knowledge of non-arising is referenced in the following two Early Buddhist Texts: dn34: knowledge of ending, and knowledge of non-arising. dn33: Knowledge of ending and knowledge of non-...
OyaMist's user avatar
  • 9,423
1 vote
Accepted

What did Buddha taught about space time?

In terms of meditation experiences involving space and time, it may be useful to read up on suttas that describe such experiences. For example in AN8.66 Liberations, we have: Going totally beyond ...
OyaMist's user avatar
  • 9,423
1 vote

Does Dogen's wholehearted way say anything about the status of memory?

Memory does not appear in the translated Bendowa However, if we consider that memory might be defined as "held thought", then this passage from the Bendowa may be relevant: All Buddhas continually ...
OyaMist's user avatar
  • 9,423
1 vote

Supposing mahayana nirvana is permanent does it have substance?

There is nothing that is called as Mahayana Nirvana. Nirvana, as conceptualised by Mahayana is certainly different from Nirvana as conceptualized by Theravadins. Even within Mahayana, as Konchog ...
HomagetoManjushri's user avatar
1 vote

Why do Buddhists argue that nirvana is nothing in addition to the skandhas?

I think that the topic of the sutta you referenced is anatta. For example the discussion with Sariputta starts with, "What do you think, my friend Yamaka: Is form constant or inconstant?" &...
ChrisW's user avatar
  • 46.5k
1 vote
Accepted

Can effective altruism (specifically Earning to Give) and Buddhism co-exist if Earning to Give was done to the extreme?

The question is asking about Bodhicitta (Mahāyāna Buddhism), Confirmed Candidate of Future Buddha (Theravada). I would like to explain Striving to attain the Nirvana with an example flying with ...
Francesco's user avatar
  • 1,119

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