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6 votes

Cyclical time in Buddhism

Cyclicality and Linearity are both alluded to in Buddhism. Essentially many beings are trapped in Samsara living their lives and doing similar things over and over through the aeons because they are ...
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5 votes
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Does the Buddha speak of the nature of time, vis-à-vis "past," "future," and "present?"

Lord Buddha definitely does talk about Past, Present and Future; but I guess your questions is mainly about, "Do we have something called time?" or "What is time?" With regards to Abidhamma, there is ...
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5 votes

Time vs Impermanence

What is the connection between time and impermanence ? Are they different terms for the same thing ? The two are very different concepts. Time can be thought of as the conceptualization of ...
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4 votes
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Is time empty of inherent existence?

Understanding time is an important part of insight into the nature of things. How can you understand the empty nature of entities if you don't understand their relationship with time? How can you be ...
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4 votes
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What is the Buddhist term for each moment being subtlety unique?

Maybe the term is "Tathata" that means "suchness" or "thusness". It is a Mahayana term. It means "Things as they are" or "reality". It's ultimate reality as opposed to conceptual reality. It comes ...
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3 votes
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Is a Ghatika an ideal minimum meditation duration?

You find references in: Tsongkhapa's Middle-Length Lam Rim Kamalshila's Stages of Meditation The Abhidharma. Je Tsongkhapa. Middle-Length Lam Rim: Indicating the length of sessions Is there ...
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  • 5,158
3 votes

Buddhist philosophy and "events"

Buddhist philosophy of anatta challenges the notion of "entities" - objects with identity, independent of the rest of the world and observer. Instead, here is an alternative: try and see the world as ...
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3 votes

Should you meditate with a timer?

Meditate with timer is very rare in Theravada Buddhism. During meditation period, you might only need to focus on breath in and breath out. This time you do not need to hear, you do not feel pain, you ...
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3 votes

Should you meditate with a timer?

Use a timer for the following reasons. Worrying about whether your session is done is a distraction. A timer will free you from this. A resolution to sit for X minutes may not work. Even if the ...
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3 votes
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Time in Buddhism

There are two Pali words that seem relevant to this question: Kalika meaning "related to time" Akalika meaning "not related to time" There's a definition of the words here in this 'glossology': ...
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3 votes

Will I keep my memories and experience with each passing incarnation?

We do not even keep our memories from moment to moment and day to day. Memories are relative. They have no intrinsic self and are impermanent. Certain memories change over time, or are covered with a ...
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3 votes

Does Dogen's wholehearted way say anything about the status of memory?

If you are referring to the intellectual capability of memory (隨念智), then this is not mentioned in Bendowa. The whole-hearted way is, as you say, awareness from moment to moment. According to Zen, it ...
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3 votes
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What leisure activities did the Buddha partake in?

I recommend a few words: divāvihāra -- for example the page-long description of that here which starts ... an expression which ... I consider to correspond to the “day’s abiding”, divāvihāra, ...
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3 votes

What leisure activities did the Buddha partake in?

Meditation. Sometimes Buddha meditated just for the sake of it even after enlightenment.
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3 votes

What leisure activities did the Buddha partake in?

This answer might overlap with ChrisW's, but I just want to quote some examples from the suttas. The first activity is "day's abiding", which seems to be sitting down and resting or relaxing. From ...
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3 votes
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Buddhists advise against "me and mine" does that include times?

These are covered in the: 15 Wrong / Right Views 16 Doubts 108 thought-courses motivated by craving mentioned in this answer 15 Wrong / Right Views Let go of the past “How, bhikshus, does ...
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2 votes

Should Buddhists give their time to helping others?

To evaluate this question correctly, it is essential to look at the difference of Theravada and Mahayana, since answers given by people from these differing traditions are bound to be slightly ...
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  • 1,524
2 votes

How do we sense the flow of time?

Past is a conceptual construct that only seems solid in the absence of careful examination. But if you look closely you will see that Past is assembled by the mind from multiple cues (as is Present by ...
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2 votes

Should you meditate with a timer?

I have been using a meditation timer with great success (There are a number of meditation APPs you can leverage). I actually started with a 5 minute timer (every morning) and since have added a ...
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2 votes

Time in Buddhism

The reason that you don't see a lot of dialogue about time is that it is a difficult subject to get right at the best of times, and not really necessary to liberation. It might be considered nothing ...
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  • 378
2 votes

Buddhist philosophy and "events"

Am I right that for Buddhists, intervals don't exist (everything lasts only for an instant): so neither do events? Ultimate reality exists only as momentary experiences of the six senses, experienced ...
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2 votes

Does the Buddha speak of the nature of time, vis-à-vis "past," "future," and "present?"

Not the Buddha, but these dictionary entries define akalika and kalika, and include these notes: Ñánavíra on Citta, see footnote: "The notion of two successive 'moments', A and B, as akálika or non-...
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  • 43.2k
2 votes

Is time empty of inherent existence?

Time is merely the concept humans use when trying to apprehend impermanence. Time is the measurement of the rate of change of things around us that are appreciable to the scale of which we experience ...
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2 votes

Is time empty of inherent existence?

I think this answer implies that (passage of) time depends on (two, separated in time) events. For example 'the time elapsed between today and tomorrow' depends on 'today' and on 'tomorrow'. ...
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2 votes
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Do we have conventional knowledge of the present?

The quote you give: The cognition of the ultimate nature of things—their all being empty of intrinsic nature—is nonconceptual because, there being nothing to cognize, no cognition arises. ...
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  • 5,158
2 votes

Do we have conventional knowledge of the present?

Finally... let me try。。。 What is the use of discussing no-cognition as it defined as "the non-existence of a thing cannot be perceived by the senses for there is nothing with which the senses could ...
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