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Dharma provides the answer at the right time. Advice may come from many of the well educated and the well wishers; however your path is your own and when the inspirational spark of enlightenment strikes like a bell you will know your decision - as is the nature of Dharma. It could be symbolic or it could be something more mundane, however you will know when ...


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The Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa I have a copy and it is a pretty awesome collection of traditional poems ascribed to the historical Milarepa. Most are very insightful, if you know how to interpret them.


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In French: “Milarépa - Oeuvres complètes, La vie, Les cent mille chants” translated from Tibetan by Marie-José Lamothe, Fayard, ISBN 978-2-213-62897-4 As far as I know, it’s not available in English.


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No, it is not true that it is done by the prescription of the Kagyu. I asked one of the senior students at the Dagpo Kagyu Ling center near me, who is very close to the head of that center, so he is in a position to know the answer. He told me that people can choose who they visualize during their practice, either the 17th Karmapa, Thaye Dorje, or the 16th ...


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The Bardo Thodol is an extract from the Guhyagarbha tantra, which is the most important tantra in the Mahayoga class, and the most studied tantra within the Nyingma school. The Guhyagarbha is certainly in the Kangyur.


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I'm going to make the natural analogy here, and talk about actual vehicles: Theravada is like mounting a horse: progress is slow, steady, personal, and organic Mahayana is like running a railway: You don't want the train to leave until everyone gets onboard Vajrayana is like buying a sports-car or a jet: it's meant to be a fast-track process, to get one ...


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Theravada is the most orthodox and conservative tradition, as it tries to stick as closely as possible to the original teachings of the historical person of Gautama Buddha. Also the Theravada monastic order tries to maintain the original monastic rules from the time of the historical Buddha, although the Buddha allowed his followers to change the minor rules....


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In simple words, pure perception is when you see everything as manifestation of Buddha-nature. Even things we usually consider bad or imperfect you see as a part of Great Perfection at a deeper level. Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche explains: ...pure perception is the main view and practice on the Vajrayana path. There is no room whatsoever for even a glimmer of ...


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What are you hearing when you hear nothing but silence? “Pure perception” is what is left when you subtract out all the phenomenal manifestations, that, because they arise and pass away, are not real, are impermanent, and without a ‘self’. These apply to all that we cling to as our identity, and also all that which we call the external world. Do you hear ...


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I would encourage you to contact Dr. Phil Stanley of Naropa University. His doctoral thesis, if I recall (I was a student of his at Naropa) involved detailed analysis of various versions of the Kangyur and the Tengyur. "Canonicity in Buddhism and Christianity" describes a bit of his work; you can decide if he can be of help. Good luck!


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