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Detailed description of the rebirth process appeared in the Garbhāvakrānti Sutra and the Abhidharmakośa, with the former being written first. AFAIK, both of these texts are significant in Tibetan traditions. "Lustfully drawn" is sexual attraction, judging from the relevant passage in the Abhidharmakośa provided by José Cabezón: The eyes [of the ...


3

In Tibetan Buddhism, there is no single fixed form of The Four Immeasurables Aspirational Prayer. There are countless variations that interpret and expand the basic list of four items. They are not even always listed in the same order. In your passage above the order is: Loving-Kindness, Compassion, Joy, Equanimity. So the phrase you're asking about ...


2

In simple words, pure perception is when you see everything as manifestation of Buddha-nature. Even things we usually consider bad or imperfect you see as a part of Great Perfection at a deeper level. Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche explains: ...pure perception is the main view and practice on the Vajrayana path. There is no room whatsoever for even a glimmer of ...


2

What are you hearing when you hear nothing but silence? “Pure perception” is what is left when you subtract out all the phenomenal manifestations, that, because they arise and pass away, are not real, are impermanent, and without a ‘self’. These apply to all that we cling to as our identity, and also all that which we call the external world. Do you hear ...


2

I would encourage you to contact Dr. Phil Stanley of Naropa University. His doctoral thesis, if I recall (I was a student of his at Naropa) involved detailed analysis of various versions of the Kangyur and the Tengyur. "Canonicity in Buddhism and Christianity" describes a bit of his work; you can decide if he can be of help. Good luck!


2

Please check out the second link (Tibetan Medicine Education Center) for more details. From Nalanda Translation's "Lha or is it La?" page: Lha La (lha bla) Some confusion exists between two Tibetan words, sometimes used interchangeably:lha and la. The first, lha, is the Tibetan word used to translate the Sanskrit deva, meaning “deity,” “god,” or “...


2

Perhaps you misunderstood the comment in question, The mental idea of the self is a type of papanca and non-self objects are also papanca. I don't read it as saying that, "papanca is selflessness of phenomena". I read it as saying that, "papanca is (somehow selfish) mental ideas" -- about (any and all) objects, including both the so-...


2

That's easy. I take "self of phenomena" as being the same as "intrinsic essence" (svabhava) of Madhyamaka, confirmed by this answer. In this answer (written 15 Aug 2018), I thought that the Madhyamaka "everything is empty of intrinsic essence" meant that everything does not truly exist on its own. A chair is a convention, yes, ...


2

The Bardo Thodol is an extract from the Guhyagarbha tantra, which is the most important tantra in the Mahayoga class, and the most studied tantra within the Nyingma school. The Guhyagarbha is certainly in the Kangyur.


1

It appears that this phrasing in particular is specific to Geshe Langri Tangpa. A google search yields some interesting results, but maybe you have read them. "Giving the Victory to Others" - on Study Buddhism by Berzin Archives "Accepting defeat and offering the victory" by Ven. Thubten Chonyi I think that here, as is often the case, ...


1

The Four Immeasurables (Sanskrit: apramāṇa, Pāli: appamaññā) or four infinite minds (Chinese: 四無量), also called Brahmavihara Loving-kindness (Pāli: mettā, Sanskrit: maitrī) is active good will towards all -> have and be the cause of happiness; Compassion (Pāli and Sanskrit: karuṇā) results from metta, it is identifying the suffering of others as one's ...


1

No, it is not true that it is done by the prescription of the Kagyu. I asked one of the senior students at the Dagpo Kagyu Ling center near me, who is very close to the head of that center, so he is in a position to know the answer. He told me that people can choose who they visualize during their practice, either the 17th Karmapa, Thaye Dorje, or the 16th ...


1

In the essay "To Suffer Is an Active Verb", Thanissaro Bhikkhu wrote: This is one of the reasons why the Buddha doesn’t have us try to go back into the past and ask, “What did I do to deserve an illness, a mental state, a situation in life?” He said that if you tried to trace all those things back, you’d go crazy. In fact, he said, you can’t trace ...


1

The foundational tantra (book) of Tibetan Dzogchen , the Dra Thalgyur, (“The Reverberation of Sound”) is only available in Tibetan. If you are interested in the highest practice in Tibetan Buddhism, that would be one you would need to read.


1

nothingness is nonexistent so there is the absurdity of referring to it as a functioning thing and an existing thing. also from the pov of substantial causes, mental factors such as intention are not main minds ie. consciousness/mind itself, meaning they cannot function as substantial cause for the production of a mind.


1

The origin of this whole line of reasoning in Tibetan Buddhism comes from Dharmakirti's Pramanavarttika. There have been extensive commentaries and teachings on this from numerous great masters of Tibetan Buddhism. You can find commentaries on it from all the extant schools of Tibetan Buddhism. For an extensive set of discussions on this line of reasoning ...


1

When you say "Vajrasatva purification practice" do you mean an appropriate visualization plus the hundred-syllable mantra followed by a dissolution? If so then the answer is: no, this is not training in the Ultimate Bodhicitta, this is a preliminary practice. If by "Vajrasatva purification practice" you don't mean the above mentioned ...


1

The point is that when we look out into the world and we see (say) a tree, a dog, a car, a white cloud, or whatever you like, what we're actually perceiving is color, shading, texture, apparent movement... We receive this great wash of ambiguous sensation, and in our heads we establish boundaries, conjure up structures and patterns, intuit relationships, and ...


1

It might be possible for you to gain the understanding you need from these two powerful excerpts. The first is from the Phena Sutta; the second is from chapter 32 of the Diamond Sutra. The Phena Sutta Form is like a glob of foam; feeling, a bubble; perception, a mirage; fabrications, a banana tree; consciousness, a magic trick — this has been taught by the ...


1

Quoting from the Pali texts (not Tibetan literature)... The first thing I notice is in the Mahāparinibbānasutta (DN 16): Then Anuruddha said to Ānanda, “Go, Ānanda, into Kusinārā and inform the Mallas: ‘Vāseṭṭhas, the Buddha has become fully extinguished. Please come at your convenience.’” Or I've seen this translation: At that time the Mallas of Kusinara ...


1

Not renouncing the three poisons is considered a foundational prelude to the journey, that the practitioner develops a recognition and respect of the function of the three poisons - which comes about as one reads and gives further practice - and that, in this graduated development, grows the clear seeing of liberation. By this very seeing, the three poisons ...


1

The Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa I have a copy and it is a pretty awesome collection of traditional poems ascribed to the historical Milarepa. Most are very insightful, if you know how to interpret them.


1

In French: “Milarépa - Oeuvres complètes, La vie, Les cent mille chants” translated from Tibetan by Marie-José Lamothe, Fayard, ISBN 978-2-213-62897-4 As far as I know, it’s not available in English.


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