5

There is knowing of Anicca, knowing of Dukkha, and knowing of Anatta, separate from each other. And then there is knowing of all three together, or rather the knowing of vision behind these three designations, in all its implications. In my experience, it is seeing all implications, top to bottom, is what makes all the difference in the world. I had ...


5

Here is the simple answer to what you feel... We are in constant pain and suffering. As to lord Buddha Eyes,Ears,Tongue,Nose,Body & Mind are Burning from three things (Lust,Anger,Confusion -[Raga,Dwesha,Moha]). But the one who practice and realize escape the burning forever,he is free. So here's what is happening to you... Now that you have ...


5

The Buddha's Dharma is beautiful in the beginning, beautiful in the middle, and beautiful in the end. Absent need for addition or reduction. It would be overly simplistic to reduce the entire teaching to one doctrinal aspect - even if it were dependent origination. Having said that - one who sees dependent origination, sees the Dharma. One who sees the ...


4

The three characteristics are very deep and profound subjects, and often our understanding of them is very superficial. For example, people often think that they understand impermanence because they understand it to mean that all conditioned things will eventually end, when in fact impermanence means much more than that. In order to see the three ...


4

How can one see suffering in the breath? Is a personal opinion/answer OK? There are different types of dukkha and I think you can see aspects of any/all of these in breathing. Birth: baby's first breath, associated with life (and crying and a whole unsatisfactory life ahead) Sickness, old age, death: you're dying, and you die when you can't breathe ...


4

As I said here, each of the Three Marks (Transience, Dukkha, Corelessness) produces a surprising effect when it is fully accepted: Fully accepting Transience brings a surprising sense of timeless peace and even a sense of stability as you get fully established in the momentary "eternal now". Fully accepting Dukkha brings a surprising sense of contentment ...


4

No. The idea of anicca→anatta→dukkha is common on the internet, particularly on DW. The characteristic of 'unsatisfactoriness' ('dukkha') is directly related to impermanence (anicca) given the Buddha asked in SN 22.59: "Can that which is impermanent bring (lasting) happiness?" Yaṃ panāniccaṃ, dukkhaṃ vā taṃ sukhaṃ vā'ti? SN 22.59 Also, the realisations ...


3

"Dhamma" is a complicated word, or a simple word that's used in many different contexts. Here is a definition. I'd summarise it to myself as "described thing" or "anything you can identify". In the phrase "Sabbe Dhamma Anatta", I think it's used in contrast to the other two of the three characteristics, i.e.: The three marks are: sabbe saṅkhārā ...


3

Dukkha is a vast subject. After 50 years of practicing Buddhist mindfulness meditation based upon the Satipatthana Sutta as taught by the late Venerable Namgyal Rinpoche, I am able to talk about the kind of Dukkha that mindfulness meditation deals with, along with a little common-sense. For example, mindfulness helps a person stay objective. Hence, physical ...


3

'Unsatisfactoriness' is one of the Three Characteristics. 'Unsatisfactoriness' refers to an inherent quality of all (conditioned) material & mental things. The cause of unsatisfactoriness is impermanence. Due to impermanence, all (conditioned) mental & material cannot be relied upon for lasting true happiness. Therefore, all impermanent things have ...


3

Can the teaching be reduced to Paticca Samuppada? Has lord Buddha preached so in any Sutta? Sariputra said (MN 28): Now, the Blessed One has said, whoever sees paticcasamuppada sees the Dhamma; whoever sees the Dhamma sees paticcasamuppada. Unfortunately, Sariputra's quote is the only place this phrase occurs in the entire Canon, so we can't see its ...


2

I believe both @Bakmoon and @santa100 have touched on it in their answers; @santa100 gives some traditional writings on the subject. Very briefly, all three of these marks of existence are intertwined in their meaning, understanding, and relation (they're "three sides of the same coin" to completely mess up an idiom!)... Let's start with impermanence: The ...


2

Beside the regular suffering, there're 2 deeper levels of suffering as taught in SN 38.14: "Friend Sāriputta, it is said, ‘suffering, suffering.’ What now is suffering?” “There are, friend, these three kinds of suffering: the suffering due to pain, the suffering due to formations, the suffering due to change. These are the three kinds of suffering.” “...


2

Bit late, but I would like to contribute. According to the tiny fraction I know of Buddhism, any material phenomena of this world, shows the four fundamental characteristics (Maha Bhuta) of Patavi (Hardness, Solidity), Apo (Liquidity, Binding or flowing nature), Thejo (Heat) and Vayo (Movement, Air). These characteristics appear, live and disappear. ...


2

Theravada recognizes only nibbāna as unconditioned -- thus, not dukkha. Other schools have disagreed on what is unconditioned: In the Sarvāstivādin tradition since the compilation of the Dharmaskhanda, three unconditioned dharmas have been recognized: analytical cessation (pratisankhayā-nirodha), nonanalytical cessation (apratisankhayā-nirodha) and space ...


2

Firstly let me give a generic background. Before diving into answering your question. Dukkha appears in many contexts and granularity when discussing Buddhism. In the level you seem to be discussing this at the level of perception. The most relevant Suttas are the ones dealing with as a perception. There couple of such Suttas but a well translated one is: (...


2

In my opinion, the linchpin teaching of Buddhism is the teaching of no-self. It is the pillar that holds the entire foundation, and once it falls, enlightenment is inevitable. You have made a very common jump in logic that will hold you until you free yourself. You have two contradicting beliefs that will never allow you to progress in your path to freedom ...


1

It seems to me that I can't own fire, for example. I might think I own the fuel, which is consumed by fire! I think Buddhism suggest that thoughts are not entirely uncontrollable -- like you can't control fire -- but you might control how much fuel and air you feed it. So see for example: Food and other cravings, and guarding the senses Related suttas (...


1

Sweeping is a process made up of many experiences. An experience is made up of the five aggregates. Each of the five aggregates is Anicca, Dukkha, Anatta in nature. That makes each experience Anicca, Dukkha, Anatta. It's not about waiting for something to finish and calling it impermanent. That's obvious even without meditation. That is not strong enough to ...


1

As shown in visuddimagga there are 18 insights to develop. They are develop in The 7 Stages of Purification and The Insight Knowledge.


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Crab bucket, if only you have taken the "impermanence" and "anatta" aspects a bit further into your meditation, you would have arrived at the "Suffering" aspect of it. Let me explain this to you... Being fully concentrated on anapanasati, he now dwells ardent, with full awareness, and clear comprehension of impermanence. With the base of this awareness, ...


1

The way I understand observing dukkha in the breath: Dukkha-dukkha: eg. observing the pain in the body caused by in-out breaths. Vipariṇāma-dukkha: eg. a observing a pleasant breath becoming not-so-pleasant or painful, and vice-versa. Saṃkhāra-dukkha: eg. observing the breath as insufficient; something that does not carry what one looks for, the ultimate ...


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