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Tilakkhana is Pali for "three lakṣaṇa". "Lakshana" means indication, symptom, attribute, feature, omen, that by which a thing is recognized. Anicca, dukkha, anatta are the three aspects of all dharmas or all phenomena. Dharmas have many different attributes or qualities, but these three are the subset of qualities that helps us let go of our simplified ...


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The way my teacher explained a crucial point about this was summarized with a single but powerful word: Immediacy! At some point in our practice our familiarity with Dharma should go beyond it being something "over there" that we study and try to understand, and become something very personal that is happening "right here" in our own immediate experience, ...


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So if I am mindful of let's say a sensation or I am just mindful of a specific body part This statement is wrong understanding. Mindfulness does not mean to be aware, conscious or observant of a sense object. Instead, 'mindfulness' means 'to remember' to have right view towards a sense object. Please refer to MN 117. should I label that "event", e.g.: ...


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There is not even a single reference in the Tipitaka, where the Buddha has said that “samatha bhavana” alone can lead to Panna/wisdom. But when one comprehends Dhamma, one’s mind get calm and through that samatha state, and one can get to magga phala. After attaining the Sotapanna / Stream Entrant stage, one can get to Ariya jhanas by focusing on that “...


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Samatha just results in the suppression of 5 Hindrances using a conceptual object as the focus. Vipassana Bhavana is the focus on the ultimate realities free from concepts, which are rupa, citta, cetasika and nirvana and the universal characteristics of them to free your mind from the corruptions of insight so you can understand causality. E.g. contemplation ...


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Can one gain panna without seeing the three characteristics? No, as far as Buddhist teaching concern. Here Panna means the wisdom of complete liberation. The wisdom you get from Samath is only a partial liberation.


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Like they say on reddit, the 3 doors are not in the suttas. The 3 doors are some inventions from the commentators of some mix of commentaries, abidhammas, and suttas. Those are not the dhamma. Even the mix of commentaries, abidhammas, and suttas on which they comment is not the dhamma. Even the suttas alone can be blindly said to be the dhamma. So first, ...


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People argue whether "suffering" is the best translation. Perhaps it depends on context. I guess dukkha has range of meaning from (extreme) anguish to (chronic) unsatisfactoriness to (eventual) insufficiency. And whose goal? And is it possible that the goal varies -- at the beginning people are caught up in suffering and want to escape it. Perhaps ...


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To understand a world empty of suffering, the Shorter Discourse on Emptiness might help. MN121 describes a discussion the Buddha once had with Ananda: MN121:3.3: ‘Ānanda, these days I usually practice the meditation on emptiness.’ The sutta starts with noting the present and shared emptiness: MN121:4.1: Consider this stilt longhouse of Migāra’s mother....


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Good question. Suffering should be fully comprehended. What exactly is the definition of suffering? Is been poor suffering? Will your suffering be eliminated if you become rich? We all know about this kind of suffering. What Buddha taught was more profound than that. It is not easy to comprehend. Buddha taught three kinds of suffering. Dukkhadukkha ...


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I think you may be over-analyzing. Remember, the ten fetters (and the three doors, and the eight precepts, and the three jewels, and the four noble truths: Buddhists really love lists...) are pointers to a single common attitude. It isn't that we try to achieve emptiness and singleness and wishlessness; it's not a conjunction of different efforts. We try to ...


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