5

Enlightened people do not overgeneralize. (This can be supported by both Pali Canon as well as Mahayana sources.) Concepts like "enlightened", "person", "I", and "thinking" are all overgeneralizations, which enlightened people do not dwell in. They may use generalizations as skilful means, to communicate the teaching, but they themselves are not bounded ...


4

In MN 56, we see disciples of the founder of Jainism, Mahavira (called Nigantha Nataputta in the suttas) debate with the Buddha. Apparently, Nigantha Nataputta taught that physical deeds weigh more heavily than mental deeds. “Reverend Gotama, Nigaṇṭha Nātaputta doesn’t usually speak in terms of ‘deeds’. He usually speaks in terms of ‘rods’.” “Then ...


3

These are not mutually exclusive. In fact, the latter method contains the 1st method you mentioned as the last resort. So do both in tandem as needed: OP: One would be to try to ignore the thoughts, not give them energy, not identify with them, be present and in time they would go into the background. Basically they are just thoughts, they are not you. You ...


2

The enlightened ones can think, and do have thoughts, as shown in the quote below. But their line of thinking is always without defilements (kilesas) - see this answer and this answer. Thoughts are not necessarily caused by desire, craving and clinging. Thoughts can arise due to sensory stimuli from the other senses (sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch), ...


2

There are three types of Sankhara. Mano,Vaci and Kaya. Avoiding Vaci Sankhara and Kaya Sankhara considered Sila. They are also called "Papa" Suppressing Mano Sankhara considered as Samadhi. These are also termed Kusala when practice in conjunction with Sila. http://buddhismpathtowellbeing.blogspot.com/2017/11/18-avoid-ten-immoral-actions-dasa.html There is ...


2

This is due to subtle Upadana. (clinging) There are three kinds of clinging. -Kama Upadana (it seems you have less of this) -Dithi upadana -Atta upadana. (perhaps this is your problem) -Silabbatha Upadana upādāna: Clinging; attachment; sustenance for becoming and birth — attachment to sensuality, to views, to precepts and practices, and to theories of the ...


2

From Dhammapada 184 "Nibbana is supreme," say the Buddhas. 43 Neither mother, father, nor any other relative can do one greater good than one's own well-directed mind.


1

Not valuable, but most important..it is the basis of his dhamma...also mind is hurdle in buddhist practice and mind itself is the cure...by crossing this mind -realm one attain goal of buddhism: nibbana..which cant be conceived by this mind..only one word to describe that state : unconditional happiness


1

Is mind the most valuable thing according to the buddha that we should protect by doing anything to everything? Are there any metaphors said by Lord Buddha on the value of protecting the mind vs doing other things ? While 'valuable' might not be the best term for it has to operate in conjunction with various components in the chain of dependent origination, ...


1

Two key questions for this are: what is the main deep underlying purpose behind your question? What do you expect to achieve after whatever "method" you start following? If what you want is "simply" relax your head for awhile, I think any approach that takes such negative thoughts away in that very moment may be useful. But I suspect that won't solve the ...


1

There are "Dhamma lists" listed here: Dhamma Lists -- many of these are lists of (harmful) mental states to avoid or escape, or of (beneficial or virtuous) mental states to cultivate.


1

The issue is attachment, not desire. Whenever one takes an action the world — be it as basic as deciding to eat food or go to sleep, or as refined as choosing to teach dharma for the benefit of others — that action arises from desire. Hunger, tiredness, compassion... all of these are organic experiences that well up in us and motivate us to take action in ...


1

The first step is to let go of the question. After all, when we hold on to questions such as these we are attached to them. The matter is illustrated aptly by a painting found on the road between Taiwan's old and new Foguangshan Temples: One day a man stepped out to run errands. On his way he passed a cliff. Not paying attention to the road, he ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible