13

One could "say" anything but that would only be a relative truth. Ultimately one person doesn't cause another persons anger. One causes their own anger. It is hard to understand ultimate reality unless one reflects within by atempting to experience things that arise in one's experience moment by moment in the present moment. Remembering to see things ...


9

Part 1 The nature of the mind is to produce thoughts. Your question about controlling thoughts seems to imply an act of force. Very well then, my friend, I will give you an analogy; for there are cases where it is through the use of an analogy that intelligent people can understand the meaning of what is being said. — MN 24 It is similar to ...


7

We don't control the thoughts that arise in our minds. But we can look mindfully at everything. Look at that which you crave but without any fantasy, romance, or delusion involved. Look at the physical process exactly as it realistically is, step by step and moment by moment. If you can truly strip away the fantasy (delusion), reality is simply not as ...


6

In any dialog you play two roles: the one who speaks and the one who listens. Buddha gave one common advice that applies to both roles, and two specific ones that apply for each of the two roles. The common advice (to listeners and to speakers) is: One does not keep quarreling with anyone in the cosmos with its devas, Maras, & Brahmas, with its ...


6

Patikulamanasikara, and the nine types of cemetery contemplations, are the meditations practiced to subdue lust. Being a medical student, they should be easier for you to learn. You can train the mind to break through the Sanna 'woman' and see it instead as a collection of unattractive things. Try to mentally analyze the body parts, or consider the body as ...


5

Enlightened people do not overgeneralize. (This can be supported by both Pali Canon as well as Mahayana sources.) Concepts like "enlightened", "person", "I", and "thinking" are all overgeneralizations, which enlightened people do not dwell in. They may use generalizations as skilful means, to communicate the teaching, but they themselves are not bounded ...


4

Your student's criticism is nothing to get upset about; on the contrary, criticism is a great treasure! It is very fortuitous that you post this now, as Ven. Yuttadhammo just posted a video about this very issue a few days ago. Of course, being a teacher of (presumably) people younger than yourself, you must take the things they say, especially in a forum of ...


4

Most people have some story about who they are. They call this their identity, their role in life. Think of this identity as a table with many legs. Each leg is one facet of their identity - for example, it maybe husband to the best wife, teacher to a loving children, son to wonderful parents, patriot of the greatest country, football fan of the greatest ...


4

I am an Abhidhamma teacher and used to be a software programmer. Your suggestion is very noble and innovative. I am not sure that the sensing process / thinking process found in the commentaries is the right starting point for such a software program. My impression is that the sensing process / thinking process were developed to show how sensing and ...


4

In MN 56, we see disciples of the founder of Jainism, Mahavira (called Nigantha Nataputta in the suttas) debate with the Buddha. Apparently, Nigantha Nataputta taught that physical deeds weigh more heavily than mental deeds. “Reverend Gotama, Nigaṇṭha Nātaputta doesn’t usually speak in terms of ‘deeds’. He usually speaks in terms of ‘rods’.” “Then ...


3

In Buddhism we learn that all conditioned things are anicca (impermanent), dukkha (unsatisfactory), and anatta (uncontrollable). So we try not to cling to conditioned things; because there is nothing permanent, satisfactory, or controllable about them to cling to. This is at the core of the Buddha's truth of suffering. Conditioned things (in this case ...


3

According to Buddhism thought to arise from the consciousness. Which are called Vitakka and Vicara. There are many types of wholesome and unwholesome thoughts. A person should have a good grasp of Abhidhamma to understand the differences completely. Abhidhamma in practice: http://103.242.110.22/theravadins/English-articles/abhidhamma-in-practice.pdf


3

There are several Sutta that deal with this namely; Dvedhavitakka Sutta: Two Sorts of Thinking Vitakkasanthana Sutta: The Relaxation of Thoughts They are very self explanatory There is another Sutta that will be helpful -- this one in particular will help understanding the cause of the particular thoughts you are having: Tanha Sutta: Craving If you want ...


3

Not "discarded" no. Just not touched. That's why they said leave front and back doors open. So they can enter and exit. You don't have to chase them away. But yeah, some thoughts can be very cool and interesting. And the more you meditate, more interesting they get :) It is very tempting to think about some of them... It doesn't mean you should stop them ...


3

Think of not-thinking. How do you think of not-thinking? Be before thinking. These are the basics of zazen. When one's perceptional faculties are acutely developed and on the cusp of awakening, logical perception will begin to occur before emotional perception. For example, if there is a loud bang, the first perception in the mind will be, just a loud bang,...


3

These are not mutually exclusive. In fact, the latter method contains the 1st method you mentioned as the last resort. So do both in tandem as needed: OP: One would be to try to ignore the thoughts, not give them energy, not identify with them, be present and in time they would go into the background. Basically they are just thoughts, they are not you. You ...


2

Sex is something that is deeply progrmamed inside of you and if it wasn't, our biologies wouldn't be called biology and we may have never made it past the Stone Age. Our sexuality is something that is deeply ingrained and takes lifetimes to master, incarnating with certain proclivities, a monk in one life, a sex-fiend in another, learning new things, etc. ...


2

I work as a software developer and think this is a fascinating project -- not because it will necessarily succeed, but because it will require us to think much more on Abhidhamma and abnormal mental conditions. This in turn can teach us a lot. I often found the best way to learn something is to try to write a program to do it. This project would face many ...


2

I had a look at translations of Dogen's essay "Universally Recommended Instructions for Zazen": Think of not thinking. Not thinking-what kind of thinking is that? Nonthinking. This is the essential art of zazen. https://web.stanford.edu/group/scbs/sztp3/translations/gongyo_seiten/translations/part_3/fukan_zazengi.html I did further research on the ...


2

To me the English phrase, "think of thinking which is no longer thought" implies that it used to be thought, that it was previously thought, but is no longer thought i.e. it is not thought any more. In other words it's something to do with after thought, not before thought. The way I understand "before thought" is, for example, if I see a tree then what I'm ...


2

According to the Dvedhavitakka Sutta, whatever one keeps pursuing with his thoughts, that becomes the inclination of his awareness. And from my understanding, the last thoughts of this life is based on the "inclination of awareness". The solution according to the sutta, is the consistency in practice towards reshaping the inclination of awareness towards ...


2

Autopositivity is indeed a great skill, virtue, accomplishment, and in its own way a paradise. With constant watchfulness and training in the Four Immeasurables (the four Divine Abodes) ones natural and spontaneously occurring thoughts can be patterned and trained to be of a purely helpful and nonharmful nature. Essentially we are developing the skill of ...


2

What I believe is what I look up to, everyday. What you believe in may just be your perception and not reality. Whatever you should be able to verify at the experiential level then you should look up to it. Since you know it from experience no external person needs to convince you of it. Every belief originates me. Many thoughts gives arise to self ...


2

Can a Buddhist truthfully say, “You insulted / offended / angered / hurt me?” A person can say that. The Dhammapada warns, however, that saying such a thing is not a cure for anger and aversion: "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me." Those who harbor such thoughts do not still their hatred. "He abused me, he struck me,...


2

The enlightened ones can think, and do have thoughts, as shown in the quote below. But their line of thinking is always without defilements (kilesas) - see this answer and this answer. Thoughts are not necessarily caused by desire, craving and clinging. Thoughts can arise due to sensory stimuli from the other senses (sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch), ...


2

Shantideva’s work is among the most beautiful and profound pieces of writing ever composed on earth in any language. It is jaw dropping in its profound beauty and the author must have been an extraordinary Bodhisattva if not a fully accomplished enlightened being. Personally, I prefer to see it as the work of a fully and completely enlightened being. To me ...


2

There are three types of Sankhara. Mano,Vaci and Kaya. Avoiding Vaci Sankhara and Kaya Sankhara considered Sila. They are also called "Papa" Suppressing Mano Sankhara considered as Samadhi. These are also termed Kusala when practice in conjunction with Sila. http://buddhismpathtowellbeing.blogspot.com/2017/11/18-avoid-ten-immoral-actions-dasa.html There is ...


2

This is due to subtle Upadana. (clinging) There are three kinds of clinging. -Kama Upadana (it seems you have less of this) -Dithi upadana -Atta upadana. (perhaps this is your problem) -Silabbatha Upadana upādāna: Clinging; attachment; sustenance for becoming and birth — attachment to sensuality, to views, to precepts and practices, and to theories of the ...


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