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8

You'd be shocked at how much different each ceremony is — even inside the same temple/centre — because there are a multitude of completely different ones, most of which would be completely incomprehensible for someone who came to them for the first time. One thing is for certain: no matter how outrageously strange the 'ceremony' looks like, it's almost ...


6

These are Tibetan Buddhist prayer wheels and they often have 'Om mani padme hum' engraved on them: According to Tibetan Buddhist belief, spinning a prayer wheel is just as effective as reciting the sacred texts aloud. This belief derives from the Buddhist belief in the power of sound and the formulas to which deities are subject. For many Buddhists, the ...


6

Sorry not Thai. I'm a westerner (black American) who attends a Thai Forest temple, and they were welcoming to me since the beginning. Honestly as someone who has been attending for a while, the "Sunday service" question would have been strange to me too. We have chanting and meditation open to laypeople once in the morning and evening. Of course, visitors ...


5

There is nothing specific to Theravada nearby (other than what you found in Redwood Valley, which I'm guessing is Abhayagiri), but just in case it is helpful, here are some other monasteries and temples that are somewhat close: Berkeley Buddhist Monastery Buddha Gate Monastery Wat Mongkolratanaram, a Thai Buddhist temple Berkeley Buddhist Temple Also less ...


4

I have been to only one temple in the West and it wasn't Thai. A very traditional one. They had no website, not spacious, the interior "design" - there's none - just traditional set up, no music, occasionally filled with smoke from burning incense. This is only generally spoken; it is not a rule, but: An irrelevant, however, funny example, would be ...


4

Previous lifestyle & herpes should not prevent a person from becoming a monk. If your friend wants to become a monk, he should talk to a monk at the temple.


3

It depends on the temple and what part of it you're entering. For instance, I used to be involved with my local Mahayana Temple. Whenever we entered the meditation hall, we did the following.. Took off our shoes Bowed to the altar, with our hands together in front of our chest. After meditation, bowed each time the meditation leader rang a bell (some ...


3

It's called Prayer wheel. These round cylinders are mantras, with thousands of prayers handwritten outside each in Sanskrit and Tibetan letters. Each full clockwise turn of the mantra is said to work the good merit of the prayers. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prayer_wheel


3

Do you like the Temple? Is it beautiful in your eyes? Judging by your response, it sounds as if it is very meaningful to you. I know that when I visit my local Zen center, entering the meditation hall causes such a reaction (along with a deep feeling of peace). Crying is a natural human response to many situations and stimuli. This article offers a socio-...


3

It varies hugely across different types of Buddhism. For example, I visited a Tibetan temple (in Europe) and entered the main room near the back during the "service". It was just as if I'd walked into a Catholic church, although far more ornate than even the funkiest western church I'd ever seen. Monks at the front facing the people, one important-looking ...


2

Bytebuster, as a fellow Bangkokian I’m happy to try to answer this question! This arrangement of images in various postures according to the days of the week is a Thai Buddhist practice, and it doesn’t seem to be very old, dating from the early Bangkok Period (post 1780s). Let’s consider them from an artistic perspective first. According to Jean Boisselier: ...


2

Chanting and good thoughts of the monks (even any other being) generate positive vibes. The string is used as a better means of conducting the vibration than may be air. (If you attach a tin to the end of two string and you speak into one you can hear the voice in the other.) Generally the string is wrapped around a vessel of water which cases the water to ...


2

I can relate to your question. I'm from Brazil and it is very hard to find Buddhists here and when I did I found only New Kadampa Tradition and FPMT (both Tibetan Mahayana). I do like FPMT very much and went to a great retreat in Nepal with them, but I'm currently more interested in the Theravada tradition. This is what I do: When I have the chance to go ...


2

When you posted this question a few weeks back, I was in a very similar situation. I had recently found out there is a Laotian temple not too far from me. The temple did not have a website and my phone call to them turned out pretty much exactly like yours! But secular Buddhist activities don't have great appeal for me and I really wanted to visit a ...


2

I remember going to my first Theravada Vihara years back and thanking them for coming to teach westerners. The monk there made a great point in response, they came because the area had a population of Sri Lankan people who requested them to come, not for some grand vision to bring dhamma to the west. Very few monastics, at least in the Theravada, ...


2

Did you try the World Buddhist Directory?


2

I've attended Vipassana intensive retreats at Tathagata Meditation Center in San Jose, a Mahasi style center. I found the atmosphere conducive to advanced meditation practice and the other yogis who practice there were equally intense/not many beginners.


2

In early times, (and still today in some Buddhist countries), laypeople would intensity their practice on certain days according to the lunar calendar. The special weekly Buddhist holy day is called Uposatha and it is observed on the new moon, the full moon, and the quarter moons. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uposatha Today, particularly in the West where ...


2

There's a book by K. Jamanadas "Tirupati Balaji was a Buddhist Shrine", whose preface starts with, [This book] has potential credibility to create controversies unknown to historical writing and the Hindu common folks who flock to worship Tirupati Balaji as one of the supreme deities. It is also a new challenge to indologist at a time when politically ...


2

The urns are numbered. The Many Faces of Fukuoka’s Nanzoin Temple says, There are 365 urns in front of the Buddha. Visitors travel long distances to place messages to their dearly departed loved ones in the urn marked with the day they died.


1

Assuming Manhattan College is in Manhattan, here is a website for an SGI-USA center which is in the Lotus Sutra/Nichiren tradition, The New York Culture Center. It is in the old Cooper Union building at 7 E. 15th Street, New York, NY 10003 (bet. 5th Avenue & Union Square West). The website's calendar shows a variety of meetings throughout the month, ...


1

If it is a Thai temple (eg. 76-16 46 Ave Elmhurst), the service is where the devotees chant to (take refuge in) the Buddha, Dhamma & Sangha, request the five precepts, generally offer the monks food, and receive a blessing in return, including sprinkling of water, as described here: https://www.yelp.com.au/biz/wat-buddha-thai-thavorn-varanam-elmhurst &...


1

I am glad you managed to save your friend's life. I suggest that both of you google "Thai monk with neurofibromatosis" and become aware that his 'problem' isn't a real problem.


1

The commentary on page 195 of this document, The Buddhist Monastic Code II, implies that it depends on the type of skin condition, where it is, how severe it is, and whether it's likely to spread. I don't know to what extent it applies to herpes. This answer to a related question starts with, The degree of strict interpretation of such rules largely ...


1

According to Worldwide Mahamevnawa Branches there's a "Mahamevnawa Meditation Monastery of California" in Torrance (in the region of Los Angeles).


1

I don't know anything about the chanting services in Laos unfortunately. I do know about the general chanting services done in Thailand though, which might be similar although the Thai chanting I'm familiar with doesn't have the refuge and precepts as part of the chanting service itself. If you want to check out a general Thai service book here's a good one....


1

Secular Buddhism is expressing itself in ways beyond the imagination. There are people in the virtual world Second Life that are practicing Buddhism virtually. Secular Buddhist Association -- Supportive Virtual Buddhist Communities There is talk of secular Buddhism all over the world. (search for communities of secular Buddhists) What seems significant is ...


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