5 votes

How do zen practitioners balance the mix between Buddhism detachment and Taoism attachment?

To say that Zen = Buddhism + Taoism is an utter simplification. To say that Buddhism seeks "detachment from all existence" is not at all accurate and to say that Taoism seeks "attachment to all ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58.3k
2 votes
Accepted

How is the pendulum understood in Buddhism?

The only thing I heard about pendulum in Buddhism was a metaphor used by my first teacher. He said, in the past people used to fluctuate, like a pendulum, between being extremely spiritual in one life ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58.3k
2 votes

Why is Zen/Chan thought to be more related to Buddhism than to Taoism?

This suggestion that Zen/Chan is Taoism tends to come from the Taoists/Chinese nationalists themselves rather than any real Chan teachings. I am from a Chinese Buddhist school of Chan lineage. Before ...
Yinxu's user avatar
  • 1,705
2 votes

How do zen practitioners balance the mix between Buddhism detachment and Taoism attachment?

I can't speak for Zen, only a little about Taoism. I'm surprised to read "a Taoist himself" describe Taoism as "seeking attachment". Instead I think that Taoism seeks some non-duality; and ...
ChrisW's user avatar
  • 46.5k
2 votes

When I empty out intentions and relax in meditation, what is this force that moves my body in complex patterns?

That's chi, not wu wei. Wu wei is more of an approach - one that can give rise to feelings of chi, aid in samatha meditation, etc. Using chi is outside the scope of Buddhist practice, although Jwing-...
user20010's user avatar
  • 309
1 vote

Similarities between Daoism and Buddhism

With my very little understanding of Daoism I think you can approach Tao through Buddhism but one can't achieve Theravada Nibbana via Daoism perhaps Mahayana Nibbana. I think the teaching of Daoism is ...
SarathW's user avatar
  • 5,607
1 vote

Comparison of Nirvana, Tao and Brahman/Atma

The essential difference between Atman of Vedanta (Hinduism) and Nibbana of Buddhism appears to be that the former is conditioned (sankatha) by PERCEPTION of worldly phenomena, whilst the latter is ...
Devinda Kalupahana's user avatar
1 vote

Is there common ground between the Tao Te Ching and Buddhism?

Wuwei, as how I understand it, has these understandings, depending on the context: You do something because you are born for it and do it without wondering why you need to do or learn how to do it (...
Ooker's user avatar
  • 635

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible