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9

Craving (lit. "thirst", tanha) is a technical term that means that very phenomenological moment when you (here!) daydream about something (over there!). Buddha says "unsatisfied craving IS dukkha" (suffering) - note how he does not say "craving is the cause of suffering", he says "unsatisfied craving IS". That's because dukkha isn't exactly "suffering", it ...


8

If you want an abhidhamma answer, you have to speak in abhidhamma terms. "Wishing for pain to go away" is a sutta statement. It involves a wisher, and describes a sutta action. lobha and dosa cannot arise in the same citta, certainly. They are mutually exclusive cetasika that arise in the javana cittas of the process of a single experience, and all ...


6

As dean mentioned, there is a sutta which seems to match your question. In the Brahmana Sutta: To Unnabha the Brahman, Venerable Ananda says, "Brahman, there is the case where a monk develops the base of power endowed with concentration founded on desire & the fabrications of exertion. He develops the base of power endowed with concentration ...


5

Generally speaking, I think you're right. Ānanda, when one dwells contemplating gratification in things that can be clung to, craving increases. With craving as condition, [the rest of D.O. chain] comes to be…. Such is the origin of this whole mass of suffering. (SN 12.52-57, 12.60) In addition to that standard explanation that goes from enjoying to ...


4

Here is an answer that is based on my study and meditation. It is not citing any official sources and trying to stay away from technical explanation in favor of real-life examples. -- What is the difference between Tanha and Upadana? To use a traditional example. Say you met a very nice person. Let's say that person had a beautiful smile and sweet soft ...


4

There is more subtlety to the mind's relationship to feelings than only craving or aversion. The Vedanās and the underlying tendencies that arise are described in the Pahana Sutta (SN 36.3) like this: In the case of pleasant feelings, O monks, the underlying tendency to lust should be given up; in the case of painful feelings, the underlying tendency to ...


4

Taṇhā doesn't automatically have to relate to neutral feelings. Remember, the twelve links of dependent origination are talking about nessisary causation, not sufficient causation, so when the Buddha says [W]ith feeling as condition, craving [comes to be] the meaning is that feeling is necessary for craving to arise, and without feeling, craving can ...


4

It is very difficult to deal with attachment (clinging; egoism) if one has not dealt with craving. If (the urge; drive; energy of) craving is not extinguished then attachment will keep raising its ugly head. It is like having craving symptoms towards a drug. To resolve this, the craving symptoms must be destroyed via cold turkey, otherwise the mind will ...


4

Let me introduce you to the old South Indian Monkey Trap (from this article): In Zen And The Art Of Motorcycle Maintenance, Robert Pirsig’s bonkers-but-brilliant philosophical novel that turns 40 this year, he describes “the old South Indian Monkey Trap”. ... The trap “consists of a hollowed-out coconut, chained to a stake. The coconut has some ...


4

It's kind of complex and would take a long time to explain in full details, but here's a simplified version: There's a chain of reifications leading from craving to selfish action to self. This is what was supposed to be explained in Dependent Origination but unfortunately most of the detailed descriptions seem to be lost. From bits and pieces available in ...


3

Reification is simpistic naive superficial perception. It's a generalization of the same problem that children have with toys. A child sees a new shiny toy and because he does not think deeply, because his perception is superficial - in his mind the toy is attractive and desirable. Reification is seeing the outer image and buying into its glow, its fake ...


3

Ignorance is a word for the universe before it developed Mind with its ability to discriminate, recognize, judge, separate, and set goals. Most of the Twelve Nidanas describe development and taking shape of the above qualities and corresponding representational experiences. The naive mind, as it develops, delineates entities, calls some of them desirable, ...


3

In Pali Canon, Buddha gives the following image of Will Power: Gladly would I let the flesh & blood in my body dry up, leaving just the skin, tendons, & bones, but if I have not attained what can be reached through human firmness, human persistence, human striving, there will be no relaxing my persistence. According to my teacher, if you look at ...


3

I agree with enenalan. i dont remember from what sutta. it was something like, when one wants to be somewhere, The desire to get there is ceased once you have reached your destination. Interestingly, in Buddha's first sermon, one of the causes of suffering (or stress -dhukka) is "craving for non-becoming or vibhava-tanha" . in all pali cannons, ...


3

The "craving-crushing voice" sounds like Nibbida, if that's what you're asking. There's a lot written about it, including this introduction by Piya Tan.


3

To me, these are three entirely different things. Eight Worldly Winds are an allegory for a list of egoistic concerns, like being obsessed with fame, blame, etc. Tanha (thirst) is a metaphor for craving something unattainable, in other words an inner conflict between "is" and "should". Upadana (fuel) is a metaphor for "feeding" an unhealthy state of mind ...


2

From the Pali dictionary from the Ven. Nyanatiloka (p. 327) Taṇhā: (lit. ‘thirst’): ‘craving’, is the chief root of suffering, and of the evercontinuing cycle of rebirths. “What, O monks, is the origin of suffering? It is that craving which gives rise to ever-fresh rebirth and, bound up with pleasure and lust, now here, now there, finds ever fresh delight....


2

Anatta doctrine held by some Buddhist, that there ultimately is no-soul or self Correct. and nothing really "exists" Incorrect. Mind & body exist. Five aggregates exist. Nibbana exists. but is empty of inherent existence Empty of 'self' existence. Empty of permanent existence. But exist temporarily. and therefore insubstantial The five ...


2

It is bhava-tanha. If you read the same Bhikkhuni Sutta you quoted in the question, it says: This body comes into being through craving. And yet it is by relying on craving that craving is to be abandoned.' Thus was it said. And in reference to what was it said? There is the case, sister, where a monk hears, 'The monk named such-and-such, they say, ...


2

Brahmana Sutta: To Unnabha the Brahman I have heard that on one occasion Ven. Ananda was staying in Kosambi, at Ghosita's Park. Then the Brahman Unnabha went to where Ven. Ananda was staying and on arrival greeted him courteously. After an exchange of friendly greetings & courtesies, he sat to one side. As he was sitting there, he said to Ven. Ananda: ...


2

After understanding this answer, you will realize there are a lot of sutta, which explaining 3 Taṇhā with 4 Upādāna. You can use this explanation in everywhere of Tipiṭaka, i.e. brahmajālasutta because the sutta I linked below is just the example. What is the difference between Tanha and Upadana? Taṇhā is beginning-lobha, Upādāna is often-arising-lobha ...


2

If we say pleasure is bad, that would lead to the conclusion that one must practise extreme asceticism. The Buddha found that both extreme asceticism and extreme indulgence are both bad and prescribed the Middle Way through the Noble Eightfold Path. If pleasure is not bad, then what is bad? From SN 22.79: "And why do you call it 'feeling'? Because it ...


2

Yes, there are kammic consequences to any volitional act because as the name implies, it entails volition, or more precisely, it has an intention. In simple terms: If you give into a craving, it's temporarily stilled, but comes back afterwards due to it being reinforcing. Buddhist principles are not commandments. Lay people in this regard are adviced to ...


2

Are there any karmic consequences from the harmless consumption of a slice of cheesecake? And why? Cheesecake is just food. All sentient beings are sustained by food. Sentient beings are not sustained by wishes. Suffering is sustained by wishes. So don't wish for the cheesecake, just eat it if it's there, sharing it kindly with others. Should ... forcibly ...


2

Khanti/patience is indeed a very important virtue to cultivate. It's listed in Sn 2.4 as among one of the greatest protection for a practitioner. Also refer to many other related suttas. Patience, compliance, seeing contemplatives, discussing the Dhamma on timely occasions: This is the highest protection. ~~ Snp 2.4 ~~


1

Similarly, if we do virtuous acts and reflect on those acts regularly, the perception of a 'virtuous person' increases as well, doesn't it? This too, then, is Bhava Tanha? Dana is the perfect case to illustrate that merit depends on ''good deeds'' and the intention behind them, as usually claimed by the buddha. Never forget that deeds (thought, speeches,...


1

There are pleasures which cause no harm for others, do not require suffering of others to gain them, yet not in the sphere of the five senses. Thinking that pleasure is bad, is foolish: no progress (going forth) without pleasure. Short and hurtful for many or leaving the low realms of fight after not lasting.


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