Hot answers tagged

18

Your confusion is clear as day to me. :) As is the true meaning of "emptiness". The challenge is how to explain it to you in a way you can understand. :) You are stuck on this idea of "object" being something that exists ontologically. Whether it's made of parts, whether it's a transient aggregate that will eventually fall apart, right ...


8

This topic is famously developed in Vajrayana's highest tantras such as Mahamudra and Dzogchen. The point is to shift the focus of experience from the samsaric mind with its constant judgement of things in relation to ego and the values ego identifies with, e.g. "is this useful to me or worthless", "is this cool enough for me or too basic"...


7

I've got a simple answer for you: Sleep is not a jhāna. The Buddha never says, not in Pāli not in Chinese not in Sanskrit, that sleep is a jhāna. Sleep is also not nibbāna. Sleep is also not nirodha. You just forget your dreams when you wake up and it seems like you were up to "nothing," but your mind was quite active despite you not remembering it....


7

The key phrase, I think, is: "those things that I have known with direct knowledge..." (emphasis mine). Some things must be experienced as direct knowledge. Teaching or discussing them with those who have not yet had some measure of direct knowledge will merely lead them into circular reasoning and philosophical maundering. The Buddha taught the ...


6

From SN 7.16 - Paccanīka Sutta: At S›vatthı. Now on that occasion a brahmin named Paccanıkas›ta, Relisher of Contradiction, was residing at S›vatthı. Then it occurred to the brahmin Paccanıkas›ta: “Let me approach the ascetic Gotama and contradict whatever he says.” Now on that occasion the Blessed One was walking back and forth in the open. Then the ...


5

I'll try to explain this from the Theravada perspective, which I think is more or less the same as Madhyamaka emptiness, once you analyze it deeply. In addition to this answer, please also see "Linking Madhyamaka emptiness to Theravada emptiness through papanca". From Sutta Nipata 4.14, we read: "I ask the kinsman of the Sun, the great seer, ...


5

Time in DN 16, MahaParinibbanaSutta, is already clear for the Sutta Pali memorizer, but it's hard for the reader because it's too long for skipping reading. Memorizing with the memorized & enlightened monk is the way to study tipitaka faster&easier really really. In DN 16... Ven.Sariputta's Lion's Roar (no. 16) comes first story, then the Buddha ...


5

A teacher with a closed fist is one that holds back relevant information. In this regard the Buddha is saying he does not obscure dhamma, aka anything relevant to the goal of liberation. As for the first quotation, this is akin to a math teacher saying “in my time I’ve learned a lot of stuff that isn’t related to math” but as a math teacher, talking about ...


5

The Buddha is basically saying: I told you everything you needed to know, without holding anything back I know more than what I have told you, but what I did not tell you, is not important for you


4

In MN116, Once upon a time, five hundred Buddhas awakened for themselves dwelt for a long time on this Isigili. They were seen entering the mountain, but after entering were seen no more. When people noticed this they said: ‘That mountain swallows these hermits!’ That’s how it came to be known as Isigili. desessāmi, bhikkhave, paccekabuddhānaṁ nāmāni. I ...


4

You can find the Pali words on Sutta Central: ... saddho kāyassa bhedā paraṁ maraṇā sugatiṁ saggaṁ lokaṁ upapajjati ... To answer your question, I think the text has been correctly translated. The translated word “breaks” corresponds to "bhedā". For this context see notes from the PTS: "Abl. bhedā after the destruction or dissolution in ...


4

We can find mentions of morning, midday or noon and afternoon in AN 3.19. In the same way, a mendicant who has three factors is unable to acquire more skillful qualities or to increase the skillful qualities they’ve already acquired. What three? It’s when a mendicant doesn’t carefully apply themselves to a meditation subject as a foundation of immersion in ...


3

The Buddha smiles many times in the suttas, in fond remembrance of experiences that brought great wisdom. MN83:2.1: Then the Buddha smiled at a certain spot. The Buddha does not smile at the suffering of others. His smiles are never cruel. His smiles are for the remembrance of great wisdom and insight that can be shared. The Buddha smiles for us all, never ...


3

That's one of several translations of this Karaṇīyamatthakusalena, Yanta santaṃ padaṃ abhisamecca; Sakko ujū ca suhujū ca, Sūvaco cassa mudu anatimānī. They all translate it with the same word, "upright". The Pali word are ujū (straight), sakko (able/capable), and su- (good). Here is a dictionary definition: https://suttacentral.net/define/uju ...


3

AN 4.39, AN 4.40, DN 5 and also see MN 55 Then Ujjaya the brahmin went up to the Buddha, and exchanged greetings with him. When the greetings and polite conversation were over, he sat down to one side and said to the Buddha: “Does Master Gotama praise sacrifice?” “Brahmin, I don’t praise all sacrifices. Nor do I criticize all sacrifices. Take the kind of ...


3

The Pali Sutta Pitaka has multiple editions including the Sri Lankan (PTS), Thai and Burmese (Sixth Council) editions. Here, I list links to footnotes by the translator (Ven. Thanissaro) commenting on the differences between the three editions for various suttas - SN 42.10, Ud 5.9, Ud 8.6, Ud 3.2, Ud 2.7, Ud 4.8, Ud 1.5, Ud 8.7, Ud 6.10. These footnotes will ...


3

Part of the "philosophy of science" (as it was taught me in Physics class in school) is that there are different ways of looking at things, different levels of details -- e.g. sub-atomic physics, then chemistry, biology, maybe ecology after that, astro-physics -- not to even mention sociology, psychology, maths, and so on. So these are different &...


3

That sounds like the simile in AN 3.130 below. This describes three types of individuals and their anger. Anger is a sankhara (volition, mental formation). "Monks, there are these three types of individuals to be found existing in the world. Which three? An individual like an inscription in rock, an individual like an inscription in soil, and an ...


3

From AN 9.34: Ven: Sariputta: “Reverends, extinguishment (Nibbana) is bliss! Ven. Udayi: “But Reverend Sāriputta, what’s blissful about it, since nothing is felt?” Ven. Sariputta: “The fact that nothing is felt is precisely what’s blissful about it. Sukha or happiness for an unenlightened person is experienced when encountering pleasant feelings (from the ...


3

The Buddha advocates active investigation and practice (vs. blind faith): MN80:16.5: Let a sensible person come—neither devious nor deceitful, a person of integrity. I teach and instruct them. MN80:16.6: Practicing as instructed they will soon know and see for themselves, The Buddha focuses on the Four Noble Truths regarding suffering (v.s. the nature of ...


3

In theistic religions, scriptures are either a form of primary revelation - an incorruptible verbatim record of the words of god(s) conveyed by prophets, or a form of secondary revelation - a divinely revealed vision seen by prophetic seers that is conveyed in their own words. In Buddhism, the scripture mainly contains the discourses and teachings of the ...


3

The story of the Buddha stopping his relatives, the Sakyans and Koliyans, from getting into a war over water rights of the Rohini river, comes from the traditional commentary to Dhammapada 197 - 199. The Buddha uttered Verse (197) to (199) of this book, in the Sakyan country, with reference to his relatives who were quarrelling over the use of the water ...


3

It's not investigation of energy, it's animitta samadhi that can relieve severe physical pain. SN 47.9: Etarahi kho panāhaṃ, ānanda, jiṇṇo vuddho mahallako addhagato vayoanuppatto. I’m now old, elderly and senior. I’m advanced in years and have reached the final stage of life. Āsītiko me vayo vattati. I’m currently eighty years old. Seyyathāpi, ānanda, ...


2

Then connection between sleeping and meditation is well explored in AN7.61. In this sutta, the Buddha advises Venerable Moggallāna on ways to avoid drowsiness, since drowsiness is hard to give up. AN7.61:2.1: “Are you nodding off, Moggallāna? Are you nodding off?” AN7.61:2.2: “Yes, sir.” AN7.61:2.3: “So, Moggallāna, don’t focus on or cultivate the ...


2

Possibly MN 35, however the protagonist is not a bhikkhu but is a Jain: All the plants and seeds that achieve growth, increase and maturity do so depending on the earth and grounded on the earth. All the hard work that gets done depends on the earth and is grounded on the earth. In the same way, an individual’s self (attāyaṃ purisapuggalo) is form. Grounded ...


2

Possibly MN 38, where the monk held: At one time the Lord was staying near Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika's monastery. Now at that time a pernicious view like this had accrued to the monk called Sāti, a fisherman's son: “In so far as I understand Dhamma taught by the Lord it is that this [same; identical; anañña] consciousness itself runs on, ...


2

The disciples of the Buddha spread the teachings far and wide, touching many different languages and cultures. For example, we have the Pali canon as well as the Chinese canon and many others. Although the correspondence between the different root languages is absolutely amazing, differences do exist. Exploring these differences is an ongoing effort of many ...


2

The reason is that it explains emptiness, and the reason for the explanation, which is as important. It explains that even although things exist, they exist based on our conditional factors. For example tables do not exist in nature, we create them and agree to call it the way we call, and give it the desire shape, so we can put our coffees and other things ...


2

The general techniques are now known as the method of loci, or memory palaces. These were widely used in the medieval world even after the advent of books (hand copied books on vellum would have been a much bigger investment of time than memorising), and were essential to civilisation and religious practice in the pre-literate era. The Rig Veda, Torah, & ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible