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5

There are a few others that I know of too ... http://www.themindingcentre.org/dharmafarer/ http://www.buddha-vacana.org/ https://obo.genaud.net/ https://84000.co/ ... see also English (or other European) translations of Pali Canon (plus various books). IMO the (translated) English words change (from one translation to the next), because a word of Pali ...


4

The "killing" reference would be this one probably -- Kesi Sutta (AN 4.111) Perhaps that's analogous to a doctor's not giving medicine to a patient who won't benefit from it. And perhaps the Buddha had the welfare of others -- the whole Sangha -- to consider too. Another instance is Channa in DN 16. And there are a few other examples on pages 89-90 of ...


4

That translation you quote is not very clear. What it actually says is, animals are classified by their inborn characteristics, what modern science calls "phenotype". While humans are not classified like this - their iherited qualities such as hair color, eye color etc. are not useful for separating humans into classes. Instead, humans are classified by ...


4

There's a really long footnote here, which starts with a paraphrase of the commentary ... This is a riddle verse the clue to which lies in the identification of the metaphors used. According to the comm., the root is craving; the two whirlpools (ie. 'dviraava.t.tam': rendered above as 'turning-twice') are the eternalist and annihilationist views; the three ...


4

I think most of the people contributing on Buddhism.SE do not qualify to call themselves Dhamma teachers. Their answers also cannot be considered a Dhamma teaching. The following is a better approximation, from Mahāgosiṅga Sutta (MN 32): “Reverend Sāriputta, it’s when two mendicants engage in discussion about the teaching. They question each other and ...


4

This translation (of DN 16) includes this footnote: In the earlier edition of this work, mahapadesa was rendered as "great authorities." It is now known that the proper meaning of apadesa is not "authority," but "reference" or "source." Besides, from the passage it is clear that there are only two real "...


3

It's a Mahayana sutra. Info. about the Samadhiraja sutra from the wiki page here. Full infos. and whole sutra is available here.


3

The Pitāpūtrasamāgama-sūtra is most likely based on some earlier Abhidharmic writings from one or two centuries after the Buddha’s death. Multiple versions of this sutra have been recovered, perhaps the most famous one from the Ratnakuta collection. The dating of this collection is uncertain, but the collection is mentioned in the Nikāyasaṅgraha, a ...


3

Check out Pali Dictionary of Proper Names: Okkāka A king, ancestor of the Sākyas and the Kolians. In the Ambattha Sutta (D.i.92) it is stated that Okkāka, being fond of his queen and wishing to transfer the kingdom to her son, banished from the kingdom the elder princes by another wife. These princes were named Okkāmukha, Karakanda, Hatthinika, and ...


3

In Ubon Ratchatani Luang Por Char talked about (translating from Isaan language) how "everything is teaching us." Also, working with people was developing strength in him, he said.


3

The sutta should not be read literally. Buddha describes what he believes makes actual significant difference between people, by starting off exemplifying things that are not significant differences. Among these nonsignificant properties are the physical properties we today understand thanks to genetics. In the sutta he also goes into detail what he ...


3

Absolutely. Sn 4.15 Attadanda Sutta: "When embraced, the rod of violence breeds danger & fear: Look at people quarreling. I will tell of how I experienced dismay. Seeing people floundering like fish in small puddles, competing with one another — as I saw this, fear came into me. The world was entirely without substance. All the directions ...


3

I believe you're looking for Velāma Sutta (AN 9:20). Here's Ṭhānissaro Bhikkhu's translation: https://www.dhammatalks.org/suttas/AN/AN9_20.html


3

You wrote ... (Payasi argues there is no soul so no afterlife.) However, Kassapa, one of the principal disciples of Gautama Buddha, argues there is a soul. ... but I don't think so. Instead I think the dialog or argument in the sutta is: Payasi: there is no afterlife because we don't see a visible soul leaving the body at death Kassapa: the ...


3

The word "soul" translated here (DN 23) by Bhikkhu Sujato is "jīva". In the context of this sutta, this word means "life force", and not "self". The sutta is trying to say that although you cannot see the soul leaving, still there is rebirth. That means that according to Kassapa, there is rebirth without the movement of a life force or soul. So, it is this ...


3

From Udayi Sutta (AN5.159): "It's not easy to teach the Dhamma to others, Ananda. The Dhamma should be taught to others only when five qualities are established within the person teaching. Which five? "[1] The Dhamma should be taught with the thought, 'I will speak step-by-step.' "[2] The Dhamma should be taught with the thought, 'I will ...


2

OP: Could someone help clarifying the sixth channel of the eighteen dhatus - that is - the mental objects (dharma-dhatu), the mental faculty (mano-dhatu) and the mental consciousness (mano-vijñāna-dhatu)? Here is a good explanation: The element which is mano-dhatu or mind-element is nama. Mano-dhatu comprises the panca-dvaravajjana-citta (five-sense-door-...


2

Firstly, there are the five aggregates and the five clinging aggregates. From SN 22.48 and from this question: “And what, bhikkhus, are the five aggregates? Whatever kind of form there is, whether past, future, or present, internal or external, gross or subtle, inferior or superior, far or near: this is called the form aggregate. Whatever kind of ...


2

Do we have any knowledge about the teaching that he has not revealed to us? There are three factors to determine what the Buddha has taught: One is, the teaching is not limited by what the teacher can teach, but by what the student is capable of receiving. An Einstein, when being the teacher for a kindergarten, he can only teach ABC. Two, the Buddha only ...


2

A simple example illustrates the Buddhas vast knowledge. The Buddha was Sakka thirty-six times, which presumably gave him skills and knowledge beyond our ken. Yet I also very much doubt that teaching us how to be Sakka would be of any use to us here and now in our journey along the Noble Eightfold Path: AN7.62:2.2: I was Sakka, lord of gods, thirty-six ...


2

How to understand the lankavatara sutra and 'mind only' will depend on what practice or practices you are engaged with. At least some Buddhists thought that the "one mind" - Buddhahood -- includes all other minds. From scholarship by Charles Jones, p113 of Chinese Pure Land Buddhism: Incidentally, people complain about academic analysis, but I think that'...


2

Thrangu Rinpoche once said that everything we see (all phenomena we experience) is our own projection - except other people's minds. Only other people's subjective experience is not our projection and therefore exists independently of us.


2

Samdhavata-Samsarata (translated above as "wander and transmigrate") literally means "continuously run or flow". It evokes an image of water in a river, carrying itself forward but never running out. This is a reference to the stream of life in nature. In context of this sutta I would translate it as "reproduction". Generations of sentient beings derive ...


2

It is ‘breaking up,’ bhikshu, therefore it is called ‘world’.” (Lujjati) Loka Sutta


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