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15

Your confusion is clear as day to me. :) As is the true meaning of "emptiness". The challenge is how to explain it to you in a way you can understand. :) You are stuck on this idea of "object" being something that exists ontologically. Whether it's made of parts, whether it's a transient aggregate that will eventually fall apart, right ...


12

It means that so-called reality is actually our interpretation. When our perspective changes our experienced reality changes. This is why the boy says, don't try to change reality (bend the spoon). Change your mind, and your reality will change automatically. There is no enemy to fight, no prize to attain. It is your mind that creates these interpretations &...


9

In Tibetan Buddhism, emptiness is analyzed in many different ways. Madhyamakavatara by Candrakirti lists 16 types of emptiness. These include emptiness of emptiness, emptiness of the unobservable etc. I will not list them all here, but if you are interested you can find detailed explanations in Chandrakirti's Madhyamakavatara with Commentary by Ju Mipham. ...


9

Not all forms of Buddhism define emptiness in the way you describe; in Theravada Buddhism, for example, emptiness mainly means "empty of self": “katamā cāvuso, suññatā cetovimutti”? “idhāvuso, bhikkhu araññagato vā rukkhamūlagato vā suññāgāragato vā iti paṭisañcikkhati — ‘suññamidaṃ attena vā attaniyena vā’ti. ayaṃ vuccatāvuso, suññatā cetovimutti”. ...


9

In my understanding, this basically speaks to the following Buddha's expression (SN 22.90): By & large, Kaccayana, this world is supported by a polarity, that of existence & non-existence. But when one sees the origination ... as it actually is with right discernment, "non-existence" ... does not occur to one. When one sees the cessation ... as it ...


8

As I understand, Mahayana's shunyata (noun, because shunya is adjective) includes all Three Characteristics of Existence, as well as Nirvana (sometimes counted as the fourth!) In this sense, Shunyata is the all-encompassing view, and as close as it gets to Ultimate Truth, while Anatta is but one aspect of this truth.


7

Since this answer is based on research and my other answer was based on my experience alone, I am starting another answer in the hope of avoiding confusion with all the previous comments. The following posits that the original approach to sunyata is positive. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahayana According to some scholars, the Buddha nature discussed in ...


7

Well in Mahayana, just like in Theravada, we strive for the end of striving. As @ChrisW said, Heart Sutra is written from the perspective of completion, the end of striving. This is called "taking the result as the path". Meaning, instead of discovering the result step by step, you try the result on, like a hat, until you internalize it through getting used ...


6

Emptiness in eastern philosophies usually have a more subtle meaning than we use in the west. Check this wikipedia article on Emptiness. And there are many answers regarding emptiness (sunyata) like this one. There is also an article in wikipedia on Śūnyatā. The most common understanding on emptiness (on Buddhism) is that it is dependently originated. It ...


6

I'll preface my answer by suggesting that you find a qualified teacher. That is to say, someone with years of formal study in a monastic setting leading to a qualification such as Geshe or Ajahn or equivalent. Comparing Theravada and Mahayana is going to get you a lot of biased answers. The two traditions organize ideas in different ways and use terms ...


5

I would add to this, that in the reception of these two terms, there is a difference. While the two terms are possibly used synonymously in the second sermon of the Buddha (compare the answers already given for this), the terminus technicus in early buddhism is anattā/anātman, being as one of the three marks of existence a claim of the Buddha which marks the ...


5

I would say yes, it is a [seemingly] valid understanding. Usually, from a Madhyamika-Prasangika point of view, it is stated that: The meaning of emptiness is dependent-arising; and the meaning of dependent-arising is emptiness. See Tsongkhapa's Ocean of Reasoning, page 501... Geshe Lhundrup Sopa's Steps on the Path to Enlightenment, page 138, and so ...


5

The biggest issue with music is: you can get attached to it can created mental recitation of the lyrics which in turn creates verbal fabrications Hence best is to resort to more conservative meditation pratice. Having said this Richard Shankman of Metta Dharma Foundation teachers mindfulness of sound as an alternative meditation technique. Excerpted from “...


5

The original Buddhist teachings do not include a doctrine of non-duality. The Buddha's enlightenment came from ending craving & attachment rather than from ending dualistic perceptions & thoughts. Understanding good & bad for moral/social purposes is one kind of knowledge. Seeing & understanding the true nature of reality for liberation is ...


5

The word 'Buddha' means 'Enlightened'. It is the Buddha that is the light of the world. Buddhism states there can be only one Original Buddha in a world-system (MN 115). Jesus was a new light for Judah but not for the world. Jesus brought light to the violent tribal hypocritical religion of Judaism but Buddha (obviously; probably) brought light to Jesus. ...


5

There are two sets of Mahayana sutras: The seventeen Perfection of Wisdom sutras (Prajnaparamita Sutras), and The other sutras, of the Wheel of Perfect Differentiation. The first set does not present Indra’s net while the second does. Tibetan traditions posit the first set as being “of definite meaning” and therefore study it and overlook the second. They ...


5

1. Do other Mahayana Buddhists apart from the commentator above, also call the intrinsic essence (svabhava) of a chair, as the "self of chairs"? Yes, this is a common expression in Mahayana texts on the topic. 2. If Theravada states "sabbe dhamma anatta" and Mahayana states "sabbe dhamma asvabhava", does it mean that anatta = asvabhava, and therefore, atta ...


5

Short answer: because understanding that phenomena are not "solid", but are in fact an interpretation/imputation, removes craving and passions in regards to them, which prevents dukkha that arises from that. Long answer: Normally we think that world is like a fish tank - a 3D environment full of objects, some of which are food, some friends, some dangerous ...


5

UPDATE based on the edited question with a suggested definition of karma. While it is true that the Buddha taught that each and every volitional action has specific consequences this is most definitely not in opposition to the fact that repeated actions based on volitional thoughts can be habit forming. Indeed, consequences of a karmic action can be that it ...


5

"I'm just trying to figure out how extinction can avoid the extremes of eternalism and annihilation." And therein lies your problem. If you are trying to figure it out, you are dealing in concepts, not nirvana. Every word you speak answers itself. It is a closed loop. A closed system. Step outside. How would you define a word without using ...


5

I'll try to explain this from the Theravada perspective, which I think is more or less the same as Madhyamaka emptiness, once you analyze it deeply. In addition to this answer, please also see "Linking Madhyamaka emptiness to Theravada emptiness through papanca". From Sutta Nipata 4.14, we read: "I ask the kinsman of the Sun, the great seer, ...


4

Here are some URLs for some good info on Nagarjuna and his teachings. Some great sites below, too. Dr. Berzin (Fulbright Scholar, etc.) was a translator for HH the Dalai Lama for a while and the late Ven. Tsenshab Serkong Rinpoche, a teacher of HH the Dalai Lama. I. "Biography of Nagarjuna", [http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/archives/...


4

In 'pure' mathematics, the truth of an expression like 2+3=5 depends on the definition of the addition operator and the definitions of the numbers such as 1 and 2 and 3 and so on. I think these definitions are 'axiomatic'. In 'applied' mathematics e.g.when you're adding physical objects (such as apples), then the truth depends on your ability to identity "...


4

The teaching that all things composed of parts are without self, but are mere names and labels designated in dependence on their parts is something that most definately is taught in the Pali canon, quite explicitly in the Vajira Sutta with the analogy of the analysis of the Chariot. The reason why this doesn't contradict rebirth is that when a person dies, ...


4

Maybe the term is "Tathata" that means "suchness" or "thusness". It is a Mahayana term. It means "Things as they are" or "reality". It's ultimate reality as opposed to conceptual reality. It comes from the word the Buddha used to describe himself," Tathagata" that means "one thus gone". In Chan stories, tathātā is often best revealed in the seemingly ...


4

More or less, in first approximation. Kinda. Well, not really. There are multiple levels of realization of Emptiness: Understanding things as inherently impermanent. Understanding things as made from infinitely nested parts and not having an internal "core" that makes them what they are, or internal "soul" or "engine" or "control center" that makes them ...


4

No, this is not an OK-ish understanding, since it does not approach traditional interpretations (whether that of Tsongkhapa or his opponents belonging to the Jonang school or the Nyingma tradition). First, from the Madhyamika-Prasangika viewpoint (Buddhapalita, Candrakirti, Shantideva, Tsongkhapa, etc) there are thee types of dependent-arising: Dependent ...


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