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13

The first book I read about Buddhism described the Sermon at Benares, i.e. the Dhammacakkappavattana, as explaining that the cause of suffering (the second noble truth) is, ... the craving to have what you don't have; the craving to keep what you can't keep; the craving to live; even the craving to die. And here is the same quote from Access to Insight, &...


10

I am familiar with the story of Ñāṇavīra Thera, and while I deeply appreciate his work, esp. on 12 Nidanas, which for me is a good evidence that he indeed could have been a stream-enterer, I feel that his suicide was a very unfortunate outcome of the bad karma he created in the past. This karma, in its turn, came from a chain of negative mind states that ...


10

I used to think much the same thing. I thought that the main problem according to Buddhism is suffering. But the Buddhist resolution to suffering isn't extinction or happiness, but is more like an in between peace. The bit about nirvana, is the historical Buddha attempting to explain his program of ending suffering, by using a word that sounded a lot like ...


9

There is no simple answer, since it will always depend on the context. However, in most cases, it would go agains the first precept: to abstain from killing. However, there could be situations where the act is interpreted in different contexts. Thich Nhat Hanh once wrote (a few years after the incident in the picture): The Vietnamese monk, by burning ...


9

Look. You basically keep asking the same question. So my answer from last time still applies. But I suppose it's very hard to break through this mood, so let me re-emphasize a few things: You are not alone to feel this way. I feel this way. Buddha felt this way. There is nothing fundamentally "wrong" about your situation. Feeling that everything is empty, ...


8

What you're looking for is Vesali sutta. vesali sutta Then the monks — [thinking,] "The Blessed One, with many lines of reasoning, has given a talk on the unattractiveness [of the body], has spoken in praise of [the perception of] unattractiveness, has spoken in praise of the development of [the perception of] unattractiveness" — remained ...


8

Things can go wrong in meditation. Some of the are as follows: If you are not equanimous, i.e., you are reacting to different situation thus creating negativity. This can accumulate to an extent this might be very dangerous. The basis of your meditation is greed, hatred or delusion. There are some techniques where the basis is this hence can easily go wrong....


7

There might be something along those lines in SN 4.23 Godhika Sutta. Page 85 of The Patimokkha Rules Translated & Explained says, Case (b) is apparently derived from SN 4.23, where Ven. Godhika takes his life and gains arahantship just moments before death


6

If the goal is to end suffering, why don't Buddhists simply kill themselves? Buddhism is a "Middle way" between extremes. The doctrine of the Middle way is (after telling the bikkhus that he was the Buddha) the very first thing that the Buddha taught: "There are two extremes, O bhikkhus, which the man who has given up the world ought not to follow-the ...


6

All misbeliefs are basically said to be variations of 2 types of misbeliefs. Uchcheda Vada - Nihilism Sasvatha Vada - Eternalism Buddha has repeatedly rejected both of them. Believing that it all ends after death falls under "Uchcheda Vada". So if you believe in that, you can't be considered as a Buddhist. Any conclusion you come to or any action caused ...


6

Is it wrong to wish you could die? I think it's an example of craving (i.e. a craving for something to not be, or to be other than it is), as described in the first noble truth. I'm so over life. I'm nearly 50 and I feel worn down by everything I'm so over 50 ... sometimes "worn down" can be good. The expression reminds me of this phrase: Early this ...


5

You shouldn't even think about things like suicide. Thoughts will be full of negative emotions and states that it will drag you to lower planes. When you are doing the act you will have negative thoughts which would mean that your next life is bad. You are also breaking the precept of not killing which is very grave. Also it is best you see a doctor but ...


5

Have you been to see a doctor about this? Depression can cause life to lack appeal. Why is life worth living is one of those questions that cannot be answered in words, it's an inner feeling that doesn't need an explanation that most have felt at some point. It's a sign of good health to have a passion for life. If whatever is causing you to feel that life ...


5

The Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta states the following: "And this, monks, is the noble truth of the origination of stress (suffering): the craving that makes for further becoming — accompanied by passion & delight, relishing now here & now there — i.e., craving for sensual pleasure, craving for becoming, craving for non-becoming. The idea is ...


5

History of martyrdom in Buddhism The Burning monk of Saigon, Thích Quảng Đức is perhaps the most famous of monks in recent times who self immolated for a cause, however he is hardly the first, in fact he follows a very ancient precedent set since before the beginning of history in Buddhism. The Buddha in his life just preceding his Buddhahood offered ...


4

I do not find any merit in discussing suicide because in my mind it is not on the path. It is a dead end street. It is like jumping off the train - you don't get to your destination. If someone is a stream enterer, they might still get stuck in the folly of the human mind. Taking one's physical life is a sign that you take the personal self too seriously and ...


4

The sutta doesn't say that the Buddha allowed him to commit suicide. When Mara reported this to the Buddha, venerable Godhika committed suicide. Then the Buddha saw what has happened and said that he has attained Nibbana. According to Bhikkhu Vinaya, the only allowable act that comes close to committing suicide is rejecting medication, if you are suffering ...


4

Your calling it "suicide" (i.e. intentionally killing yourself) and "committing" (a crime) suggest that the action/intention/view you have in mind are not appropriate. The following paragraphs from pages 82 and 83 of this Vinaya commentary, The Buddhist Monastic Code I: The Patimokkha Training Rules Translated and Explained, by Thanissaro Bhikkhu suggest ...


4

As this is a science driven question I will try to give a science driven answer first and then an additional comment. People can have a nervous breakdown anywhere, watching TV, in a elevator, working out... I can find no scientific evidence that meditation can create such thing, I can say that for 2 reasons: 1- As far as I'm aware there is no group ...


4

This Scientific American article describes some of the benefits of mindfulness: As a remedy for depression and anxiety, mindfulness meditation may help patients let go of negative thoughts instead of obsessing over them. Training people to experience the present, rather than reviewing the past or contemplating the future, may help keep the mind out ...


4

What are the reasons why people equate suicide with Nibba> Because they do not understand what Nibbana means. Why is Nibbana totally different to suicide?> In Nibbana there is no re birth.


3

The following only is relevant if you follow Buddhism\ the following are all from Shantideva's text: "Upon finding the boat of human birth now, cross the great river of suffering. O fool, there is no time to sleep, for this boat is hard to catch again." When shall I encounter the extremely rare appearance of the Tathagata, faith, human existence and the ...


3

I think the question should be reworded to, if someone has a psychological breakdown, permanent or temporary, is this caused by the meditation retreat or is this a consequence of this person being vulnerable or unready to dive into the depths of meditation. Because I know people that have bawled their eyes out for a two day retreat, I did not see them ...


3

I would be extremely suspicious of claims that. As a general rule of thumb, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Saying that meditation can cause psychosis sounds like a pretty big claim to me, so I'm inclined to set that aside until there is some solid evidence to back it up. A lot of so called 'unusual' things can happen during meditation, ...


3

The Buddha characterized our human lives as "dukkha". Often translated as "suffering", but that is really a bit dramatic. A more accurate definition is "unsatisfactoriness." This "Unsatisfactoriness" doesn't arise from life itself, but rather from our response to it. As was said in Hamlet, "there's nothing good or bad but thinking makes it so." The ...


3

There are excellent answers here, full of details, so I will just add a short one: Killing yourself is a selfish thing, the opposite of Buddha's teachings! You have a precious human life, you can use it to make merits, you can help others to break free from the sea of samsara, you can increase the loving kindness in this world. When you are free then you ...


3

Beware that even describing the advantages of dying is an offence. I quote from this commentary on the Vinaya. Page 74: Should any bhikkhu intentionally deprive a human being of life, or search for an assassin for him, or praise the advantages of death, or incite him to die (saying): “My good man, what use is this evil, miserable life to you? Death ...


3

Possible list of reasons for not condoning suicide: You are intentionally taking a life which is breaking Sila and Vinaya It bring social problems like misery to loved ones and oftens dependents The act is done with negative mental state hence does not lead to beneficial rebirth in the next life. Based on the view of extinction or nihilism which is ...


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