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1

A little personal background: my mom is Filipino, and my dad is Sinhalese (he professes to be Buddhist but is verbally, physically, and psychologically abusive). My mom is not a Buddhist but her life insights have enriched my Dhamma practice. I see toxic people as bottles of poison or pesticide: you know they’re harmful if in contact with but you don’t have ...


1

A little personal background: my mom is Filipino, and my dad is Sinhalese (he professes to be Buddhist but is verbally, physically, and psychologically abusive). My mom is not a Buddhist but her life insights have enriched my Dhamma practice. I see toxic people as bottles of poison or pesticide: you know they’re harmful if in contact with but you don’t have ...


2

In some ways this is a trick question, because the meaning of suffering in the Buddhist sense is different from the meaning of suffering in the colloquial English sense. In the Buddhist sense, suffering is a mental phenomenon: an attachment that drives us and constantly reproduces the conditions we live in. When that kind of suffering is eliminated, it doesn'...


2

One who has attained the fruition of stream-entry or has arrived at such right views & convictions which generate the path for the attainment of fruition of stream entry is a great person who dwells in relative comfort. One who goes beyond doubt lives with verified confidence and is considered a rich person even if wothout money.


4

You quoted the Nakhasikha Sutta which states that suffering that remains for a person who has attained stream entry is like dirt under the fingernail, compared to suffering remaining for an ordinary worldling which is equivalent to the great earth. For e.g. a person's immediate family members all die due to an unfortunate accident. This person may become ...


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