Hot answers tagged

9

A.K. It's not a foolish question at all, I think it's something everyone spends sometime trying to understand when they first start learning meditation and mindfulness. Mindfulness is being present. If you're sitting you know you're sitting, if you're standing you know you're standing. If you are washing dishes you are only washing dishes, you are not ...


8

I recommend the book In The Buddha's Words by Bhikkhu Bodhi. It is an anthology or selection of translated suttas from the Pali canon. It is also thematically and systematically arranged. You can look at the Table of Contents on the Amazon page I linked. It is 512 pages long, which is quite alright. PDF version here. I quote from the Preface: In an ...


7

This leads to great breadth, but little depth. If you want to get to the depth of a practice, where the true wisdom is, you need to stick to a practice and see it through. As Goenka said, if you are looking for water, you dig a well. But you don't start digging a well, stop digging down after 2 feet, then start a new well. Over and over again like this, you ...


6

In terms of general knowledge, it can be helpful to be familiar with the religions of the world on a basic level and there are many books which compare the world's religions in an easy format such as The Handy Religion Answer Book. Reading a book such as this gives an interesting glimpse into the vastness of the the world's religious traditions. Studying ...


5

For those (relatively) new to Buddhism here is what I'd (generally) advise in order: Read Bikkhu Bodhi's In the Buddha's Words: An Anthology of Discourses from the Pali Canon as this will ground you in the Buddha's own words. Read HHDL and Thubten Chodron's Buddhism: One Teacher, Many Traditions which will give you a respectful overview of the different ...


5

'Mindfulness' ('sati') is not 'observing' ('anupassi'). This common idea is a misunderstanding. 'Mindfulness' ('sati') is 'remembering' or 'keeping in mind'. For example, in formal meditation/concentration development, at the most crude level of practise, 'mindfulness' does not mean 'observation' but 'remembering' to be observant (rather than being ...


3

Maths is a big subject too. And so is German Literature, or Engineering, or Roman History. Perhaps people aim to become competent rather than all-knowing. I noticed this about the Gelug curriculum (a school of Tibetan Buddhism) -- Geshe: The Gelug curriculum, which lasts between 12 and 40 years, centers around textual memorization and ritualized debate, ...


3

It depends on the individual. I've heard several people say it would be too confusing or wasteful. The analogy offered in Advaita Hinduism is that it is far better to dig one deep well than several shallow wells. In my personal experience the opposite is true, much to the chagrin of some spiritual friends and family. We must each obey whatever is our ...


3

The Buddha taught a handful of leaves but the amount of things he could have taught was like the amount of leaves in an entire forest . He didn't teach all these things he could have taught because none but the handful of leaves he picked could lead one to the transcendence of suffering. It's not about grabbing hold of a whole lotta teachings, It's about ...


3

I agree totally with what Ryan posted and would like to add that even though you have the energy and time to practice, you still have to have the wisdom to penetrate all the different teachings. It is possible and I know of a few people who are really gifted with insight and wisdom who could do one practice, move over to another to continue and moved to the ...


3

I think it's a good question, since I have asked me the same some time ago. Wouldn't being mindful about these activities interrupt the reading/study? Yes, it does. It 's practically speaking impossible to do both things at the same time. What you can do is intentionally interrupt your activity. Like when you're reading a book, you can stop reading for a ...


3

A very interesting question that you asked. When you are fully engrossed in something, the time stops, as you are in oneness with it. The following describes such a moment: “We cannot be aware of these most precious moments when they are actually happening - such as when trying to finish something late at night over a table with a group of friends, ...


2

I am not Buddhist, but from what I have heard from them, my experiences are sufficiently applicable to be worth voicing here. I have found great value in studying religions that I do not necessarily believe in. I find it to be a very powerful way to learn from a culture that is very different from my own. In particular, I have found it very effective at ...


2

Welcome Bruno. In the original Buddhist scriptures, it is reported the Buddha gave many teachings about livelihood, including Right Livelihood in the Noble Eightfold Path. The Buddha encouraged lay or secular people to study & be proficient in earning a living. One meaning of the Indian word 'dharma' is 'duty'. From a Buddhist perspective, education is ...


2

Piya Tan at http://dharmafarer.org has translations and commentary of many of the suttas. Using the "sitemap" on the right or bottom of the page, you can find specific suttas (sorted by number), or, his "sutta discovery (SD) series" which is sorted thematically. Some people disagree with [some of] his commentary (see e.g. this topic).


1

If you do not wish to become a Buddhist scholar, I would suggest to stay away from too much literature. You do not need retreat centers and gurus either. If you are interested in practical Buddhism, i.e., personality change, I suggest you focus on meditation. Talking about meditation, again, it is easy to get caught up on technique and irrelevant details. ...


1

Thanissaro Bhikkhu's "Wings to Awakening" (https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/thanissaro/wings/index.html) is a good interpretive guide to the suttas for practitioners. Also see the "Beginnings" material at this same site (https://www.accesstoinsight.org/).


1

This website is the best study tool because if you ask about a certain sutta I can explain it for you.


1

http://www.acidharma.org/aci/index.html The website link above has breakdowns of works by Je Tsongkhapa, -- (Specifically his work on Lam Rim) -- Nāgārjuna, Shantideva, and various lojung texts with their respective analysis. The audio classes are MP3 streams, and the teachers tend to do a sentence by sentence breakdown of the works being discussed. They ...


1

I think it can definitely provide a better understanding of ones own field by studying other fields. Let me give you an example from my own life. I work as a physiotherapist. Physiotherapists on e.g. clinics and hospitals work closely together with nurses, ergotherapists, doctors and other healthcare professionals. Working with other professions has taught ...


1

I think Dharmafarer's sutra discovery series is the best starting point. (http://www.themindingcentre.org/dharmafarer/sutta-discovery/sutta-discovery-volume-1-9) Maybe you can start your study with the trilinear Suttas (http://www.themindingcentre.org/dharmafarer/sutta-discovery/trilinear-suttas)


1

I also suggest starting with an anthology if one is not much familiar with suttas or the dhamma. Then, I suggest read the Majjhima. I think it is the best option for the first nikaya. The suttas are not as long as digha (that contains much more context narrative), but long enough to not be raw and provide a nice reading. Also they are so mixed that it is ...


1

As Reuben2020 says, In the Buddha's Words is a really great place to start. Could I also recommend Rupert Gethin's book Sayings of the Buddha. It's a collection of sutra's from the Sutta Pitaka of the Pali Canon. There is a couple of page introduction before each sutta which puts the text into context which I found extremely useful. Good luck with your ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible