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Practically, religious images are made using precious medals to prevent decay, so that the image can be available to venerate for many generations to come. From a more devotional aspect, choosing materials that we think of as beautiful shows a great reverence for the person that image represents. Religious images often "open and lift our minds" to higher ...


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Swastica is an ancient symbol of sun, rotation, wheel, cyclic activity esp. in nature, and by extension -- eternity. When German Nazis adopted a then-emerging theory of racial superiority of Germans, finding it well suiting their political goals, they took swastika as a symbol of their supposed identity with the Aryan race, and, more generally, inherent ...


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"Buddha statues generally show a particular Mudra (a Sanskrit word) or hand gesture." ~ Cited from: Buddha Statue Mudras Bhumi Sparsha Mudra Samadhi / Dhyana Mudra Abhaya Mudra Dharma Chakra Mudra Vitarka Mudra Vajira Mudra Uttara Bodhi Mudra Apart from the above listed Mudras there can be a combination of two Mudras or a variation of a Mudra depicted in ...


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Just to add to the above, it is unknown what the historical Buddha looked like, and it is a matter of debate if he was, indeed, one particular person. There are conjectures based on the Suttas and so on, but none of those are essentially good enough to make a strong conclusion on the subject. So the ordinary response has been to make him look like whatever ...


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That fits the description of the "the Medicine Buddha", Bhaiṣajyaguru is typically depicted seated, wearing the three robes of a Buddhist monk, holding a lapis-colored jar of medicine nectar in his left hand and the right hand resting on his right knee, holding the stem of the Aruna fruit or Myrobalan between thumb and forefinger. ... but I have no ...


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My answer refers to Tibetan Buddhism, I am not sure whether the same applies to other traditions. Eye opening ritual is the final stage of a statue filling ritual. A newly bought statue is hollow inside and its base can be opened with a tool. If one sells an already filled statue, it is a good practice to ask in what circumstances it has been filled. ...


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Buddha is said to have had 32 major physical characteristics, and the second feature among them is named, heṭ­ṭhāpāda­ta­lesu cakkāni jātāni honti DN30 This means, on the soles of Buddha's feet there's a wheel sign with thousand spokes. According to commentaries, this wheel sign is said to have accompanied by 108 sub features, and Swastika is the first of ...


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It is more of a cultural thing and corruption in teachings of Buddha, Buddha himself had strictly prohibited symbolism which causes attachment to it. eg: Taliban demolished a similar structure then it caused resentment and grief even to the Buddhist community which shows their attachment to the symbol\Idol completely defeating the core teaching of ...


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In Thailand you can take to the Abbot in a temple. They will do a blessing and open the eye. I have one Buddha I took to the temple In Koh Phangan and the Abbot actually drew on the Buddhas eyes and also applied powder to the base. Other temples have simply blessed and made chants. Most importantly is they way you feel about your Buddha and how you respect ...


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I think this is because many foreigners buy them to decorate their bathrooms. That has made life difficult for even the genuine foreign Buddhists. But they probably wouldn't stop a monk from taking a statue abroad unless it has antique significance.


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Actually I think this symbol is associated with Jainism and not Buddhism. At least that is what one sees in India. The enlightened beings in Jainism are often depicted in similar postures as the Buddha and it is easy to mix them up. In India usually the Jain images are depicted naked. In the case of the picture above it could be a case of just mixing things ...


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Even though the Uddesika Chetiya is not perfect to represent the Buddha, it doesn't mean that paying respect to it is not meritorious. Read the story of Pulinathupiya thero. There was a monastery on a rock called 'Samanga' near the Himalaya forest. There lived a hermit named Narada. He had fourteen thousand students. One day he thought, "I'm living here ...


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My impression is the original Buddha statues were of Greek origin. Try google 'Greco-Buddhist art'. The original Indian Buddhist art (below) did not depict a 'personal form' but usually showed a wheel, tree, footprint or empty space as a symbol of the Buddha. This is probably because the Buddha famously said: "Enough, Vakkali! What is there to see in ...


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Looking at the way the robe is set, It does not look like a Mahayana Buddha's statue. It seems it is Theravada Buddha. It is possible from Sri Lanka or Myanmar. I may be wrong. By the way, it is a good choice.


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This is a great source for identifying Buddhist statues by what they are holding. The Buddha on the right is a representation of the historical Buddha (Shakyamuni). You can tell by the head-pattern, which represent 108 snails that crawled on the Buddha's head. In Japanese Buddhism, a red lotus held in the left hand is called Benikairen (紅開蓮) and symbolizes ...


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First, you should keep in mind that rules are different for those on the monastic path than those who are lay practitioners. Monastics are not supposed to engage in any sexual activity (in most orders), but it is presumed that lay practitioners can engage in sexual activity without it being considered misconduct (so long as they adopt the right attitude). ...


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Put the shrine above your meditation cushion so that you sit below the Buddha. The Buddha isn't really a sleeping companion. The emphasis should be on practice, even if you practice in the bedroom. The shrine should be in a place dedicated to the practice of the Noble Eightfold Path. Be mindful of the place, not the room. Indeed, if it is in your bedroom, ...


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Spend time shopping for a Buddha image. Find one that inspires you, not others. For this writer the face is the most important feature, next to size. He always has a good meditation kneeling in front of the twenty foot image at the local temple, even on Poya day. Besides size this image also has a wonderful face.


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Im not sure that is made in Siam, it may be Lao, Lanna (shan), Khmer or some Burmese counries. But, it is statue of image of imagination of autor's sight on the mind about Shakyamuni )


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This is a depiction of the Buddha in his last moments of life, just before he achieved parinibbana (nirvana-after-death). There are 32 signs of a great man and 80 secondary signs (all of which the Buddha possessed) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_characteristics_of_the_Buddha#The_32_Signs_of_a_Great_Man and long slender fingers, long earlobes as ...


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You're welcome. He also said his skin was like gold. This too is up for interpretation. But with support from other sutta, i believe the idea of beatiful skin tone at the time was not too white nor too dark. My take is that Buddha had tan skin. But for sure he shaved his head. In many sutta, it was one of the insults to Buddha by those of others ...


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Thich Nhat Hanh said that, when he was seven years old, he saw a picture of the Buddha on the cover of a Buddhist magazine. He was sitting on the grass ... very peaceful ... smiling. And I was impressed. Around me people were not like that, so I had the desire to be someone like him.


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Even though the image will never be same as The Buddha himself, I believe there is nothing wrong with having the image for veneration. Personally, I feel so much peaceful and secure. One of advantages for me is that I usually discourage myself to think any unnecessary thought others than related to Dhamma while I am at a temple where you can usually see big ...


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