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from an EBT (early buddhist text) perspective: http://lucid24.org/tped/d/dhamma/index.html#dhammamsutva ☸Dhamma, dhamma ☸Dhamma = The Buddha's Teaching. Dhamma = Natural laws of the universe, like impermanence, death, illness, etc. dhamma = idea/thought cognizable by the mind (6aya): 💭 manasā dhammaṃ viññāya. dhamma = thing. A broad term that can mean ...


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A literal reading of this translation brings the conclusion there is the same person transmigrating or reincarnating from life to life. Therefore, there will obviously be the impression of a permanent substance, such as a "soul", reincarnating from life to life. The Neo-Buddhists can argue until they are blue in the face that what transmigrates is a "re-...


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I think that "atta" and "atman" are the same words, two different languages (Pali and Sanskrit). That in a Buddhist context, "atta" (and its converse, "anatta") are related to ideas like upādānakkhandha (from SN 56.11) and sakkāyadiṭṭhi ... and furthermore that (according to doctrine) any/all theories about self (or "self-existence"?) are unsatisfactory or ...


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The word dhamma in these passages has multiple meanings and can only be understood in the context of the passage they come from as you seem to understand. This is difficult for most Buddhist students and anyone who does not speak the original language of these ancient texts. That is why it is important to rely upon good translations and on good spiritual ...


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Samdhavata-Samsarata (translated above as "wander and transmigrate") literally means "continuously run or flow". It evokes an image of water in a river, carrying itself forward but never running out. This is a reference to the stream of life in nature. In context of this sutta I would translate it as "reproduction". Generations of sentient beings derive ...


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There are two languages, Pali and Sanskrit. Pali sounds like a mumbled version of Sanskrit, basically. Many of the consonants found in Sanskrit words are skipped in corresponding Pali words. So Dharma is Sanskrit and Dhamma is Pali. Atma is Sanskrit and Atta is Pali. Anatma is Sanskrit and Anatta is Pali. Sarva is Sanskrit and Sabba is Pali. Nirvana is ...


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According to Theravada Buddhism a person (satva) is explained in terms of six major elements. Patavi,Apo,Tejo,vayo,Akasa (space) and vinnana (consciousness) The way I understand these elements are smaller than atoms. They are even not physical. The Buddhist term for them is Dathu. https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.140.than.html


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One of the lessons Buddhism teaches is that everything is impermanent. Our thoughts, our feelings, our emotions, our bodies, our life. Everything. We are surrounded by death. We are mortals. There is an end to this. However, Buddhism also has the concept of rebirth. Actually think about it, rebirth is there due to impermanence. For if one dies and there's ...


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"Rebirth" is a moral teaching in Buddhism; about destiny due to action (karma). "Impermanence" is a transcendent teaching in Buddhism. "Rebirth" and "impermanence" are not intended to "fit" together.


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There is no difference in manner or extent between how rebirth happens in this very life from moment to moment and what happens from life to life. So ask yourself, how does rebirth in this very life that happens from moment to moment fit with the fact that everything is impermanent? It is precisely because we are impermanent beings that we are reborn from ...


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I think the confusion is the meaning of the word "element". Modern school children are taught that the word "element" has a physical/chemical meaning -- see (periodic table). The English word "element" can be used in other ways though -- I could say, "the head, tail, and claws are 'elements' of a cat". Elements means that they are part of, which combine to ...


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