Hot answers tagged

15

How is it possible that he had past lives? Because until he became the Buddha he hadn't eliminated craving. Craving leads to clinging, clinging leads to becoming, becoming leads to birth. how did he know they were his? What defines them as his? Do you remember your childhood? If so, why do you call it your childhood? Because your current existence(...


9

Buddhism teaches that everything is 'conditioned', and so there is no independent/eternal self: The concept of no-self or anatman or emptiness of self is that it is not possible to identify an independent, inherently existing self; that the self only exists in dependence upon causes and conditions. You mention "the practitioner himself who is scanning", ...


8

Can a non-Buddhist get Nirvana? Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam etc. are just words, conventional language. What is important is the teaching and practice of the teaching. In the famous Maha-parinibbana Sutta, there is a passage where the Buddha explains to the wandering ascetic Subhadda, that "in any doctrine & discipline", that does not contain the Noble ...


5

In Buddhism a human being is composed of matter, feelings, perceptions & memories, mental fabrications (thinking) and consciousness. A soul is a conceptual belief which does not exist. It is concept which is deeply ingrained in the mind. Just like a car is just a concept which is an accumulation of parts a steering wheel, chassis, wing mrrors etc.. ...


5

"Especially, the vipassana practitioners say that scanning the body and finding no atman or self in it is proof that self doesn't exist." The reasoning of said practitioners is flawed -- otherwise, I could claim absurdities like "there is no sun" after scanning my body and not finding a burning star in it. "But what about the practitioner himself who is ...


5

The Buddha did explicitly refute the notion of a permanent self in the Ananda Sutta. He says that if he had said that there is a permanent self then that would conflict with the statement that "all phenomena is not self". "Ananda, if I — being asked by Vacchagotta the wanderer if there is a self — were to answer that there is a self, that would be ...


5

Acts of cognition do not require a "cogniser, a subject" that knows (apart from the mind itself), because consciousness belongs to the body & mind. The original question contains an implicit assumption that is invalid. Cognition results from consciousness; just as a mirror reflects without a self. Buddhism explains there are five aggregates (khandha) ...


5

Buddha did not teach that things exist (that's one extreme) or that things do not exist (that's another extreme). Buddha teaches that things exist to some extent, in some context, relative to some frame of reference – and do not exist in other contexts. It's the same with the "self".


4

Asking if "is there a soul in me?" or "is there not a soul?" are questions coming from a wrong framework to begin with. It's like asking "Does batman have a wife or does he not?". This question is invalid in the real world, because Batman only exists in the DC universe. Also, when you ask "is there a soul?", you have to first clarify 'is'. Are you referring ...


4

You have to look at which reality you are dealing with. If you are dealing with sammuti-sacca which is the conventional reality then one can say that a soul, self, spirit, being etc. exists. Why? Because conventional reality is dealing with concepts. A soul is a concept. A self is a concept. If you try to search for them through the method of insight ...


4

In the Pali canon, it seems there is no categorical denial of a permanent self by the Buddha. The most common texts about the not-self (anatta) doctrine are taught in the form " [something] is not self", where [something] is a phenomenon that is cognized: forms, feelings, thoughts, perceptions, etc. For example: “Feeling is impermanent…. Perception is ...


4

Attaining Nirvana is not about labeling one self as Buddhist. To attain Nirvana you should follow the path to Nirvana. Any body following this path will reach the destination regardless of what they call themselfs. So you can call yourself a Buddhist, Hindu, Christian, Muslim, Jain, Jew, etc. to start with but what matters to realise Nirvana is the threefold ...


4

A literal reading of this translation brings the conclusion there is the same person transmigrating or reincarnating from life to life. Therefore, there will obviously be the impression of a permanent substance, such as a "soul", reincarnating from life to life. The Neo-Buddhists can argue until they are blue in the face that what transmigrates is a "re-...


3

So how does one identify the events in the present life caused by karma of previous lives? The Buddha was able to do so (able to see in detail the consequences of karma); but it's an unusual ability. See Wikipedia's Enumerations of special knowledges, which includes, "Remember one's former abodes" (pubbe-nivāsanussati), that is, recalling ones own ...


3

The Gotama Buddha taught us that this is not an essential. Our mission in life is to comprehend and experience the Four Noble Truths. Our Teacher, the Buddha, was a pragmatic man. What do we need to know to understand "becoming"? We need to know and experience dukkah. We need to comprehend and experience the causes of dukkah. We need to comprehend and ...


3

Mr. Jonas Bystöm might read Alagaddupama Sutta: The Water-Snake Simile especially the introduction, which gives a good overview and the "Six View-Positions" section. The seven parts soul thing is a common folk believe even is SEAsia and has Tantric roots, one could say Hindu, and has influence especially many Mahayana approaches. To be or not to be is no ...


3

Remember the Buddha refuses to answer "Is there a self?" and "Is there no self?". He frequently points out things which are not self which is in line with his teaching "sabbe sankhara annata" (All compounded things are not-self). What you experience as consciousness is not-self because you cannot control it which is explained in the annata-lankana sutta ...


3

SN 35.85 states the world is completely void/empty (sunnata) of self or anything belonging to self. SN 5.10 and SN 12.15 state there is no temporary conditioned 'self' because, in reality, what is regarded as a temporary delusion or view of 'self' is really only 'suffering'. Why now do you assume 'a being'? Mara, have you grasped a view? This is a heap ...


3

The Pali suttas unambiguously state the entire universe is void of self (SN 35.85). When the deluded idea of 'self' is born (SN 22.81) in the human mind, according to the Pali suttas, it is not a real 'self' but merely a 'view' (SN 5.10), merely a verbal convention (SN 1.25; MN 98), merely the arising of suffering (SN 5.10; SN 12.15), merely a disease (Ud ...


3

I agree with you. The Pali suttas do not refer to a continuous consciousness at the termination of life. Instead, the suttas explain 'birth' ('jati') & 'death' ('marana') refer to the birth & death of 'self-views'. Therefore, 're-birth' refers to the re-arisings of 'self-view'. For example, you make $100,000. Re-birth is the happy view: "I made ...


3

why doesn't everyone become a Buddhist to attain supreme bliss? I think that a "true" Christian may have beliefs which (may) help them to find some peace or solace, and which have some similarities at least in their effect (if not in their form) to Buddhist beliefs. I guess for example, faith that "It's God's will" or "This is part of God's plan", and the "...


2

A concrete, substantial self implies inherent existence. Inherent existence is the lens of delusion through which we naturally view the world. Buddhism teaches dependent origination, which helps free you from this root delusion. To believe in the Hindu scriptures, you have to rely on faith. Buddhism's principles become self-evident through honest ...


2

This is an ancient debate that will not get settled today. The problem is that any self we can identify automatically takes on - in our mind's eye - qualities like permanence and continuity. These qualities are false. On the other hand - saying there is no self at all is also clearly false. It was a rare kind of nihilism to fall into in Buddha's day, but ...


2

The Buddha did not remain silent on this matter. He only remained silent to those who would misunderstand. As stated in the Ananda Sutta, the questioner of the Buddha was "befuddled" & "confused". To quote: "the bewildered Vacchagotta would become even more bewildered". As for 'nihilism', it is a 'self-view', which believes "I" will die or "others make ...


2

Once you get into the concept of the soul in Buddhism, you have essentially entered into Advaita Vedanta of Hinduism. India largely was converted to Buddhism at one point, which meant they were rejecting the Vedas, the holy scriptures of Hinduism. From a Hindu perspective, the Buddha incarnated for the specific purpose of rejecting the Vedas, because they ...


2

Yes. In Buddhism, especially in the Theravada tradition, a transmigrating soul doesn't exist (see Milindapanha 3.5.5). However, the self exists though it is not permanent and is dependent on the inter-working of the senses, sensation, perception, mental formations and consciousness.


2

There is no independent soul, there is no independent self. Everything depends on something. Buddha's past life depends on his past deeds. Thus there are souls and self but they are dependent on past causes


2

In Maha-sihanada Sutta: The Great Discourse on the Lion's Roar section of Ten Powers of a Tathagata. "Sariputta, the Tathagata has these ten Tathagata's powers, possessing which he claims the herd-leader's place, roars his lion's roar in the assemblies, and sets rolling the Wheel of Brahma.[5] What are the ten? .... (8) "Again, the ...


2

From what I understand, the concept of soul does not exist in Buddhist teachings. It helps to define it properly in English: Self (there is a self) No self (there is no self) Non-self / Not-self Excerpt below quoted from Strategies of Self & Not-self: Tonight I'd like to talk more about why the Buddha refused to get involved in the issue of ...


2

As we Buddhists believe there is no Soul. Karma is a universal force that is not yielded or governed by anyone but acts alone in its own right. There is no personal Karma,Karma is an Universal entity that effects every living thing with the exception of an "Arahant(A one who has reached nirvana)" So when you do things that generate karma your future ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible