Hot answers tagged

7

If society is collectively wrong about me then ,myself is an error , illusion or dream, not just for me but for the entire society... Yes. Correct. The Buddha said: 174. Blind is the world; here only a few possess insight. Only a few, like birds escaping from the net, go to realms of bliss. Lokavagga From Buddha's point of view if Self is Mara then ...


7

Horescopes did exist at the time when the Buddha was born but they aren't mentioned often in the Buddha's teachings. One mention of horosopes is in the Samaññaphala Sutta, this sutta lists many types of fortune telling as wrong-livelihood for monks. "Whereas some contemplatives & brahmans, living off food given in faith, maintain themselves by wrong ...


6

As a white male I am well aware that I am privileged That's as may be. Nevertheless I think that "cultural appropriation" is a relatively modern obsession: that it has become fashionable for "holier-than-thou" people in college to fuss about it; but sfaik other people are less likely to think that way (to see or preconceive it as a concern). I suppose if ...


4

You are not causing suffering to others. They cause their own suffering if they want you to get drunk with them & you refuse. You should always have metta (friendship) towards old friends but this does not mean you engage in unwholesome actions with them. Also get rid of this condescending attitude you have compassion for your friends and wish to help ...


4

In the Ayacana Sutta (SN 6.1), the Buddha explained that for the masses who are strongly clinging to sensual pleasures and other things like name, fame, wealth, health, relationships etc., it is hard to understand the full depth and breadth of the Dhamma. Then, while he was alone and in seclusion, this line of thinking arose in his awareness: "This ...


3

Actually, Gautama Buddha was not against the caste system in mainstream non-Buddhist Indian society however he did emphasize social status ('caste'/'jati') was dependent upon here-&-now kamma rather than on physical & social birth (refer to MN 93, MN 98 and other suttas in the Brāhmaṇa Vagga). For example, he often emphasized a Brahman priest or ...


3

It is a good question that you asked & not at all stupid @ Iresha Rubasinghe, but I was too busy last week to get to answer it. Today India has lost the Order of the Gautama Buddha. In the present-day Sri Lanka a great many who identify themselves as ‘Buddhist’ are really Hindus. It is because they have made the Triple Gem impure by worshiping Hindu “...


3

I suggest that you do not overthink matters in relation to Buddhism. Remember that the Buddha was not a Buddhist. He practiced The Way and then showed others how to overcome suffering in their lives. This is basically it. Do Good-Avoid Evil and Purify your Mind. The value in The Buddha Way is not in intellectualism but rather within the intuitive practices. ...


3

From this perspective, society reinforces the view of selfhood and calls it individuality, although it is a mere repetition of the movements of the social conditioning; It also reinforces self-grasping creating an illusory cocoon and reifying it as something real. Modern societies follow Mara, from the perspective of the golden ages, principle, insights ...


2

There is nothing wrong in using personal pronouns like I, you, me, he, she etc. or addressing oneself or others. After all, the Buddha used personal pronouns and addressed others too. For example, from the Akkosa Sutta, the Buddha said: "In the same way, brahman, that with which you have insulted me, who is not insulting; that with which you have ...


2

Straight forward answer is Buddhism never accept caste system or the color. In "Wasala suthra" (as I remember the name) Lord Buddha has clearly mentioned that, a person doesn't become noble by his birth, caste etc but by his act (behavior). Vasala Sutta: Discourse on Outcasts (SN 1.7) Now at that time a fire was burning, and an offering was being ...


2

Regardless of the type of caste one is in, all have an equal opportunity to become enlightened. From the Gihi Sutta: In the same way, wherever one is born among human beings — noble warriors, brahmans, merchants, workers, outcastes, or scavengers — if one is tame, with good practices, righteous, consummate in virtue, a speaker of ...


2

well like you said, the fantasy of '' a man, as an individual, does not owe society, he is free to live for himself and pursue his/her own goals. '' is what humanists who invented the the classical or new liberalism obsessed over. Those people where fed up with the theist christians, ''not spiritually'' (those people love the word spiritual) but as the day ...


2

Speaking here as a Westerner. OyaMist suggests that this is a question that should be put aside. That person's (thatza haha) question should be put aside would require that the motive be known, for as a neutral question, it is a reasonable one and should be given a qualified answer. The situation is this: The Dhamma is, in its initial steps (generosity, ...


2

If you're asking how to integrate Buddhist values with work, having a career, I might recommend this book: The Buddha's Teachings on Prosperity: At Home, At Work, In the World, by Bhikkhu Basnagoda Rahula. It's an anthology of the advice which the suttas give to lay people -- organised into different topics and with commentary for a modern (American) ...


2

Situations triggering resentment present challenges. To abandon such resentment and act freely requires mindfulness of body, speech and mind. For example, the conceit you describe is heard and resisted as coercive, impure speech. In this particular case, Venerable Sāriputta details the following advice: AN5.162:2.5: In the case of a person whose behavior ...


2

This isn't easy to answer because I'm not sure what the question is. It seems to be: How can I explain Buddhism to Christians? How can I reconcile Buddhism with Christianity? How can I answer Christian's attacks on Buddhism? You found already, and posted in your question, some topics like "Top 10 MISCONCEPTIONS about BUDDHISM." They don't make ...


2

I can see your dilemma. If you read the original teachings of the Buddha (in the Early Buddhist Texts) and compare it with what is practised today, you will find a lot of differences. For e.g. in the original teachings, there's no statue-worship, deities-worship, chanting for blessing, trances, rituals, offering of food or flowers or incense to statues etc. ...


2

I was taught by my Buddhist teacher, that sexual conduct falls under the law of cause and effect, aka karma. And that every action we do creates a future result. If we would like to have a pleasant future in samsara then we undertake activities that will provide a pleasant result. The laws of the land and accepted social norms often times "accept&...


2

Both social norms and laws are the result of a balance between personal freedom and the necessary restrictions imposed on those freedoms to ensure that the social order is maintained. Or in other words, norms and laws represent some kind of balance within a social group between the desires of each individual, against their most obvious problematic outcomes ...


1

Ānanda brought a similar question to the Buddha, attempting to hedge and bridge the issue of solitude and social interaction: SN3.18:3.3: ‘Sir, good friends, companions, and associates are half the spiritual life.’ But the Buddha would have none of that and corrected Ānanda immediately: SN3.18:4.2: ‘Not so, Ānanda! Not so, Ānanda! Good friends, ...


1

I imagine Buddhism is about following the path and then, if you can, influencing others to follow the path. I imagine Buddhists such as the Buddha or Thailand's Bhikkhu Buddhadasa had the ability to influence political activists & leaders. When I lived in Bhikkhu Buddhadasa's monastery, I met the Thai Prime Minister more than once. However, I think ...


1

Firstly, if you have romantic interest in a person, then most likely sexual lust is in it too. So, the contemplation on unattractiveness could work here. Too much of it may result in depression. The antidote for this kind of depression is given in Vesali Sutta. Secondly, you have to remember that nothing is permanent. The same person who was a baby, and ...


1

From AN4.163 we have: It’s when a mendicant meditates observing the ugliness of the body, perceives the repulsiveness of food, perceives dissatisfaction with the whole world, observes the impermanence of all conditions Paradoxically, observing ugliness is a great antidote for the seduction of attractive. The perception of ugliness develops equanimity. To ...


1

Unfortunately, it is not possible for a layman with a relationship to fully practice as a monk. Lay Buddhist is only required to observe five precepts within the Noble Eightfold Path. Lay Buddhist observe eight precepts only once a month. If you can do this in a regular or daily basis is a bonus.


1

Dhamma could lead to the end of suffering, which is something most people would be interested in right? For people who grasp to Self, Dhamma and emptiness is a step down, it's just a bad trade. For people who discover Dhamma, who accept emptiness but still remember the ideal of Self, it's a small step up, it's a good trade. For those who follow Dhamma, ...


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