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From within the practice of meditation, it can be hard to tell whether "it's working" or not. I've been a meditator for more than 30 years and my experience is that it is mostly a very slow process, and only by looking back on it from a long way away do I begin to clearly see the benefits. Life itself has plenty of ups and downs. Meditation may ...


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If you mean by this definition: Astral projection (or astral travel), is a term used in esotericism to describe an intentional out-of-body experience (OBE) that assumes the existence of a soul called an "astral body" that is separate from the physical body and capable of travelling outside it throughout the universe Then there are only a few ...


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Often around 2:00 p.m. after eating, my body falls tired. Might be a good idea to investigate and tackle the root cause to your tiredness first. Is it because you don't get enough sleep at night? or you usually eat a big lunch? or the workload is too stressful?...etc. It's actually not a bad idea to take a brief afternoon nap for 20-30 minutes to recharge ...


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Welcome to the site. These anxieties are your own psychological issues. They bubble up to the surface as a result of meditation. Meditation initially sounds all nice and pleasant with frilly bits and squishy things - although that is how it is generally delivered in the many brochures - but many don't realize what meditation can actually do. It is about the ...


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Venerable Mahāmoggallāna struggled with drowsiness and the Buddha provided a list of suggestions laid out in AN7.61: AN7.61:1.3: Now at that time, in the land of the Magadhans near Kallavāḷamutta Village, Venerable Mahāmoggallāna was nodding off while meditating. ... AN7.61:2.3: “So, Moggallāna, don’t focus on or cultivate the perception that you were ...


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Meditation may result in you needing to sleep less, but it's not going to replace sleep. To give you an example, at sesshin, we'll meditate for 10-15 hours a day. By about the third day, not only am I well rested after about four hours of sleep, but I actually have trouble sleeping due to an increase in energy. In fact, one guy in our sangha spends his ...


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I'm no expert, but I've been meditating consistently for several years & have been on retreat etc. so I have some experience of what you have gone through. I strongly recommend finding a meditation teacher. Its hard to tell what's going on based on an internet post because there are so many factors; when you 'meditate', what are you actually doing, what ...


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In general you can stop what you are doing if you think it's causing you anxiety. Although im not familiar with headspace, meditation usually fails as being ineffective rather than harmful. There are however ways in which one's training would cause anxiety & restlessness but i think it's unlikely here because i think it would be more obvious. Imho, more ...


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You're assuming they are meditating and not actually sleeping for some of those 23 hours. ;-) When we do a sesshin, we'll sit somewhere in the area of 16 hours a day. Let me tell you, even with 5 hours of scheduled sleep, as a novice you'll end up dozing off on the cushion for at least an hour if not more. Another four hours or so will be spent in a half ...


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One can get by on little to no sleep when one mediates a lot but it requires a lot of learning and jhana. If one had a good novice and a good teacher, under perfect conditions, then i think it is maybe possible to train some person in this way. However in practise when one gets to little to no sleep stages then one will often skip a night altogether or find ...


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Ah, the bliss plateau. Good that you caught this now. Some practicioners never get past it, the quietitude is too enticing for them to push past. In Zen, we call this "dead sitting" and it can completely ruin the practice of even experienced monks. What you're experiencing now is step two on your way to absorption. Step one was the monkey mind ...


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In my opinion and personal experience is what the body need is relaxation. So keep the body still and meditating is as good as sleeping.


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According to the sutta below, it is one's state of mind which determines one's quality of sleep and not the comfort of the bed and bedroom. Hence, if vipassana meditation improves the quality of your mind, then it should improve the quality of your sleep. From AN 3.35: “Well then, prince, I’ll ask you about this in return, and you can answer as you like. ...


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