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17

Buddha gave his disciple Moggallana a sequence of advice on how to overcome drowsiness during meditation. Moggallana was however continuously meditating for 7 days without sleep when he received this advice. Well then, Moggallana, whatever perception you have in mind when drowsiness descends on you, don't attend to that perception, don't pursue it. It'...


9

What are the proper relax / Sleep practices for a practitioner of meditation methods? If you do Metta meditation before sleeping you are better off, as one benefit of Metta is you sleep well. ((Aṭṭha) Mettânisansa Sutta, (Ekā,dasa) Mettânisansa Sutta) As to Buddhist point of view what is sleep and how to cope with it? This is when your Bhavanga is ...


8

Once the practitioner attains certain level of mastery in meditation and mindfulness, their sleep acquires a character of meditation. It's not like they don't sleep at all, but they do retain certain level of deep awareness during their sleep. Specifically, when they see a dream, they know it's a dream. They remain aware of their body lying down on the bed. ...


7

Actually Buddha called that the Lazyness. It is a one major factor that prevent us from getting in to the path of Nirvana. Don't eat too much, if you eat until you get the feeling it is full that's wrong. In order to stay alert drink more water, actually a major factor of being APHOO Keep a good hi-gene that will make you good Also maintain a posture, so ...


7

I am also a second year medical student, and I also used to face the same problems that you do. The meditation practice of 'Anapanasati' will allow you to sleep less and focus more. For instructions on how to practise it, follow this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=206&v=YKFl4E3YhlI Practising this meditation makes your mind calm, concentrated ...


6

One simple way to setup your mind in the morning is to re-take the refuge vow and/or the five precepts. Or, if you are a Mahayana practitioner, recite the Bodhisattva vow. Here is another consideration though: as one of my teachers said, "the morning begins in the evening". Your morning mind is continuation of the tendencies you have setup in the evening. ...


5

According to the teachings I received, once the practitioner attains certain level of mastery in meditation, their sleep acquires a character of meditation. It's not like they don't sleep at all, but they do retain certain level of deep awareness during their sleep. Specifically, when they see a dream, they know it's a dream. They remain aware of their body ...


5

The reason why the mind is like this is because, in order to sleep, we must give ourselves into drowsiness. Those with untrained minds (if not everyone) thus plunge themselves into delusion. That's why in dreams, everything's all loopy and oftentimes you don't realize that you're dreaming. When you wake up, your mind is just emerging from that state. I ...


5

If you are using meditation to go to sleep: You are inducing a hindrance. If this becomes habitual it will block your progress. Also when meditating you should be alert and hence reduce the hindrances and sleepiness. If you are not falling asleep it not an issue if you are meditating. It is said a Yogi never sleeps.


5

Meditation on Metta (loving kindness, or good will) has a traditional list of 11 benefits, three of which are about good sleep: "Monks, for one whose awareness-release through good will is cultivated, developed, pursued, handed the reins and taken as a basis, given a grounding, steadied, consolidated, and well-undertaken, eleven benefits can be ...


5

Lucid dream is a place where you can do more work, more Buddhist practice. For example, if you are afraid of fights you can pick a fight with anyone, man or monster. It's a safe place to try things you can't try in regular life. Reference: Tibetan Buddhist teacher Tarab Tulku. For more information read Chapter 19 of The Psychology of Awakening anthology by ...


3

I have heard on various occasions that the Buddha slept very little. I was also looking for some specific reference in the literature that can attest to this. One of the most common references in the early texts is the wakefulness (jāgariya) pericope: "And how is the disciple of the noble ones devoted to wakefulness? There is the case where a disciple ...


3

Dreaming is one of the 6 bardos or liminal states in Tibetan Buddhism. There complete list is the Bardo of This Life the Bardo of Meditation the Bardo of Dream the Bardo of Dying the Bardo of Dharmatan (luminosity of the true nature) the Bardo of Existence In the Tibetan tradition it is possible to work with the dream bardo by practicing dream yoga. ...


3

I heard about monks that are mindful when they are sleeping but those monks are higly trained.to reduce the number of you sleep,you could increase the length of time you do sitting meditation.people sleep because they want rest and re_energise.in meditation body can rest and re_energise.so longer you do sitting meditation,less sleep you need.


3

The Buddha is reported not to have slept, but teaching ceaselessly and just entering a state of meditation for two hours per day/night. I don't have any scriptural evidence for this and am rather sure, that none such evidence exists.


3

I have. The hypnagogic/hypnaponic state is known for the interesting and even intense phenomena that can arise. Here's my most vivid experience: I woke up one morning, paralyzed. This happened before (sleep paralysis), and I knew it was a symptom of the hypnagogic/hypnaponic state. Well, I had recently read a book on out-of-body experiences (OBE), and ...


3

If one is truly mindful during the process of death, then one of two possibilities exist; either one will pass away into complete liberation as an enlightened being or, if there is still some substratum of clinging, one will be reborn as a deva or brahma and be fully conscious of one's previous life.


3

Before I became Buddhist I did a lot of random "spiritual" practices, including "astral travel". The later is when you try to retain "waking" consciousness as you fall asleep. I only had mixed success with the various techniques for achieving that, but the one that worked more or less well was to relax the body and completely refrain from any movement until ...


3

As Suminda wrote in his answer, eleven benefits of freedom of mind through metta are listed by the Buddha, among them: "One sleeps easily, wakes easily, dreams no evil dreams." --AN 11.16 More generally, the Buddha has said he sleeps at ease even in unpleasant circumstances because he abandoned craving, aversion and delusion (AN 3.34). He also said ...


3

Monks, eleven advantages are to be expected from the release (deliverance) of heart by familiarizing oneself with thoughts of loving-kindness (metta), by the cultivation of loving-kindness, by constantly increasing these thoughts, by regarding loving-kindness as a vehicle (of expression), and also as something to be treasured, by living in conformity with ...


3

Yes Meditation can help you sleep... There is a meditation called "Meththa" also known as the "Loving kindness Meditation". This Meditation is very helpful to the daily life as well as the path. It can help you sleep better, But Let me provide the details.... The profits of doing "Meththa" (Loving kindness Meditation) as to Lord Buddha Not seeing bad ...


3

The practice of sleeping in a sitting posture can be explained as one of the 13 Dhutanga. Sitter's Practice (nesajjik'anga) — living in the three postures of walking, standing and sitting and never lying down. The advantages of sleeping less as described by the Buddha can be found in Jāgariyasutta Vigilance This was said by the Lord… "...


3

Yes, such a person can appropriately hold monastic vows in the Geluk tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. There are sleeping restrictions in the Vinaya, but not regarding the time or length of sleep. Although Vinaya states that sleep is an impediment to the three trainings, in any case over-sleeping (are 8 hours of sleep over-sleeping? this is open to ...


2

This depends somewhat on how you define "scripture." It's important to emphasize that "scripture" to a Buddhist doesn't necessarily mean the same thing as "scripture" to a Protestant Christian, despite the similar language. As Rabbit references there is a document titled the Six Yogas of Nāropa (ན་རོ་ཆོས་དྲུག་, Narö chö druk). Naropa himself was no small ...


2

I once read that meditation, yoga etc. can help to get a deeper breath and to switch more to belly breathing instead of breast breathing. Thus, those practices may potentially support your condition. Nevertheless, I think you won't find the reason or cure for it in Buddhism.


2

Meditation can definitely cause you to sleep less. When meditating one is naturally entering a calmer state of mind. When doing Samatha meditation one is temporarily suspending the hindrances thereby limiting the effect of worries, excessive thinking, restlessness, cravings, aversions, anger etc. This naturally leads to a more simple and unified mind. Such ...


2

In Tibetan buddhism there are a set of practices calles the six yogas of Naropa. They are specially important in the Karma Kagyu School of Tibetan Buddhism. One of these yogas is called the Dream Yoga and its purpose is to develop awareness during your dreaming time. The masters of this meditation never lose counciousness. When they go to sleep the know ...


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