8

That kettle example tells me you admire a certain attitude to life, an attitude of doing things right, properly, with attention to fulfilling the essential function and not having undesired side-effects. Extrapolating that a bit further, you probably have a tendency to seek the main point of ideas, you're not satisfied with the superficial - you want to get ...


7

According to Theravada Buddhism anyway, mind is different; it acts as both the receiver of the other five senses, as well as being a sense in and of itself. Meaning the mind can receive objects from any of the physical senses, but it can also receive mental objects. The reception of mental objects is different from receiving physical objects: The six ...


6

OP: "This might sound ridiculous as a jumping off point but it made me consider my attraction to certain products rather than others." Actually, it is a remarkably astute jumping off point. OP: "I really want a kettle that is well designed aesthetically and that has more advanced functions like temperature control, but it feels like this is ...


4

If there were such a sutta then maybe AN 8.54 would have been a good place to put it. It begins, As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One, "We are lay people enjoying sensuality; living crowded with spouses & children; using Kasi fabrics & sandalwood; wearing garlands, scents, & creams; handling gold & silver. May the Blessed ...


4

Sounds like you are looking for positive emotions from entertainment (e.g. music). That is one way to get positive emotions... not necessarily invalid but rather superficial and not lasting. Another way to get joy is through setting challenging goals and achieving them. When you can overcome your weakness / limits, you will feel rewarded, and worthy of self-...


4

The way my teacher explained a crucial point about this was summarized with a single but powerful word: Immediacy! At some point in our practice our familiarity with Dharma should go beyond it being something "over there" that we study and try to understand, and become something very personal that is happening "right here" in our own immediate experience, ...


4

The world is whatever a sentient being perceives as "the external world" or "the real world". If the being is sleeping it may be a world of its dream, if the being is a child it may be a child's world, if the being is having a drug trip it may be a nightmare world or a fantasy world, if the being is a business person it may be the world ...


3

Why are these called "The All": the eye & forms, ear & sounds, nose & aromas, tongue & flavors, body & tactile sensations, intellect & ideas? What else is there? Note: Here the word 'ideas' is a loose translation. The pali word is 'Dhamma'. Why someone trying to explain "The All" as being something else would fail? Because ...


3

Buddha's time in India there were many views about the world. This is similar to saying nowadays "The all mighty God" etc. These views are discussed in the Brahmajala Sutta. These wrong views lead you to a wrong destination. However, according to Buddhism the right view lead to Nibbana. What Buddha saying is nobody can comprehend anything beyond six senses. ...


3

My teacher always said, reality is your interpretation, you are in control of your perspective. Buddha said, you should be in control of your perception enough to be able to see repulsive in the attractive, and attractive in the repulsive. Buddha said, this is done by 1) "fabricating a fabrication" and by 2) "looking with equanimity". Buddha spoke about "...


3

Nice tea kettles are indeed beautiful. Yet beauty and love alone do not quite span the scope of the heart. SN46.54:12.9: The apex of the heart’s release by love is the beautiful, I say, for a mendicant who has not penetrated to a higher freedom. Focusing only on the beautiful bypasses the ugly. There will always be ugly tea kettles. And what shall we do ...


2

Above does not say moderation of sensual pleasures though it is implied since you should not see it. What it explicitly says is The pursuit of ... which is you should not seek either extremes. The Middle Way, in this case, is to accept both, whatever that comes, without seeking.


2

The five kāmaguṇa are: color sound smell flavor phoṭṭhabba (=temperature, matter, and vayo). They tie the kāma-person to live in kāma-bhava. kāma means "living in kāma loka"; and guṇa means "a binder". So, the five kāmaguṇa are things that kāma-taṇha (addicting to drug), and bhava-taṇha (addicting to becoming, born to be, future birth). See the first ...


2

The joy and happiness of spiritual development is considered to be far more superior than sensual pleasure, which is fleeting and bound up with suffering, as explained in MN 14. Also see SN 36.31 for further info. Even though a disciple of the noble ones has clearly seen as it actually is with right discernment that sensuality is of much stress, much ...


2

I feel like concentrating on impermanence and on the disadvantages, in the midst of an emotion, works not as effective. Yes, that's because what impermanence is not the one and only thing which need to be considered to uproot the cravings. No matter how hard you try can you get satisfied with any kind of cravings? It can be food. If you are fully ...


2

From what we can guess from the clues in the suttas, when Buddha started his quest for Enlightenment, there were many competing spiritual teachings in existence (such as e.g. the Jain's) claiming to be The Truth, which were postulating theories about things that were however impossible to see for oneself and verify by the direct testing in the here and now. ...


2

Short Answer: When you think "it would be nice to have more(/less) future contact with object X" - then you have craving; when you think "this feeling is (un)pleasant and it came from object X" - then you are creating/sustaining potential for future craving; and when you think "this feeling came from the mind, it is empty, dependently originated, transient, ...


2

0. History base knowledge about wrong and right view: See SarathW's Answer. Then: Why are these called "The All": the eye & forms, ear & sounds, nose & aromas, tongue & flavors, body & tactile sensations, intellect & ideas? Why someone trying to explain "The All" as being something else would fail? What does "it lies ...


2

One cannot avoid contact (described below) hence one cannot ignore the sense doors totally: Cha Chakka Sutta (Samuday’atthaṅgama) Loka Sutta What one can do it to ensure any contact (described above) does not result in craving and break the above progression of events at feeling. This can be achieved through meditation. See Food and other cravings, and ...


2

From MN 137 below, we read about the six sense media, one of which is the intellect or mind medium which senses ideas and thoughts. From MN 137 (translated by Ven. Thanissaro): "'The six internal sense-media should be known': thus was it said. And in reference to what was it said? The eye-medium, the ear-medium, the nose-medium, the tongue-medium, the ...


1

Not sure there's any conflict between Ven. T and Ven. B. Notice that Ven. B's SN 35.23 footnote on defining the scope of the All, his first footnote citing the Comy. says this: Spk: The all (sabba) is fourfold: (i) the all-inclusive all (sabbasabba ), i.e., everything knowable, all of which comes into range of the Buddhas knowledge of omniscience; (...


1

Suppose I am eating something or taking a massage to get rid of pains, is this pleasant vedana immediately connected with craving? Yes. Similarly with unpleasant feelings; Suppose I have a bike accident and I fall down the ground and my immediate reaction is: "Arghhh", and no other cursing; Is this considered aversion to unpleasant feelings? Yes. ...


1

Why are these called "The All": the eye & forms, ear & sounds, nose & aromas, tongue & flavors, body & tactile sensations, intellect & ideas? Ven. Bodhi's note citing the Commentary to SN 35.23: Spk: The all (sabba) is fourfold: (i) the all-inclusive all (sabbasabba ), i.e., everything knowable, all of which comes into range ...


1

Seeing the danger of sensual pleasure is actually one of the five strategies in the next sutta - MN 20. Obviously sensual pleasure is very difficult to abandon and one'd need to take a comprehensive approach that involves all 3 gateways of Sila, Samadhi, and Panna to have a chance of success.


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