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The word "soul" translated here (DN 23) by Bhikkhu Sujato is "jīva". In the context of this sutta, this word means "life force", and not "self". The sutta is trying to say that although you cannot see the soul leaving, still there is rebirth. That means that according to Kassapa, there is rebirth without the movement of a life force or soul. So, it is this ...


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"Soul" for most Westerners is a Christian loaded term, implying that something of the self survives after physical death in immortal (unchangeable) form. Since Buddhism does not subscribe to this perished self being real, by consequence what most people mean by "soul" is also an illusion. In Buddhism, the term anattā (Pali) or anātman (Sanskrit) refers to ...


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You wrote ... (Payasi argues there is no soul so no afterlife.) However, Kassapa, one of the principal disciples of Gautama Buddha, argues there is a soul. ... but I don't think so. Instead I think the dialog or argument in the sutta is: Payasi: there is no afterlife because we don't see a visible soul leaving the body at death Kassapa: the ...


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I apologize if this is a bad example but I hope I made myself somewhat clear. Interesting analogy but it does raise some valid point. If you look at some simple single-cell organism under the microscope, the material inside its cell wall versus what's outside are pretty similar, which's composed mostly of water. But since that "stuff" is inside the cell ...


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What you have described with your water analogy is Hinduism, and not Buddhism. Buddhism does not teach that there is no self, or that there is non-self, but rather, that all phenomena is not-self (sabbe dhammā anattā). A very apt analogy for this can be found in the Vina Sutta: "Suppose there were a king or king's minister who had never heard the ...


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The self concerns itself with small issues. Suppose the rain does not fall. Suppose that big lake shrinks. Suppose that big lake shrinks to just a cup of water between two thirsty people. At such times we often hear "MINE!" And in such harsh times, where did that "big lake of non-self" go? Why does "MINE!" keep getting reborn in life after life? So even ...


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This is one of the most difficult concepts if not the most difficult concept to understand. I am absolutely sure that %99.99 Buddhists don’t understand this. If you completely toppled the question without any doubt, you will have become Sothapanna ( stream entered). I will try to explain it. Basically, we all have a thought that we are eternal beings ( or ...


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Great example! The example gives you cover only the Rupa aggregate. Buddha said we take five aggregate as self. (five clinging-aggregate) If you substitute the word self with the word ignorance it is easy to understand this. Ignorance is the on create rebirth. Even Buddha had the body created by his past ignorance which will end only at Parinibbana. We can't ...


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