Hot answers tagged

3

You are beginning to notice the natural behaviors that we all carry out. This is a great thing as most people don't even take a moment to understand their behavior or how/why it functions that way. As you are noticing like this, all kinds of weird side effects may start arising, as you are really shaking the foundation of the way you perceive the world. Fear ...


2

This is pretty normal, I'm guessing most practitioners go through this phase. You have a certain - valid but incomplete - understanding of Dharma, and so you interpret your observations from this perspective, creating subjective reality that looks somewhat negative. What you see is not wrong, these negative observations are not wrong, but they are a small ...


2

Do you see an old woman or a young one? Or can you see both? Once you've seen, can you forget how to see it? Until we see the world as it is we don't see it, but once we've seen it we cannot 'unsee'. We may fall back on old habits and patterns (old ways of seeing the world), but enlightenment (honestly) is just seeing the world as it is. It's our natural ...


1

Both is the top of 31 planes of existence. People there have longest life, however they are arising and vanishing more than trillion times per second as well, and they are going to die as well. They are not going to reborn in hell immediately, however they can reborn in hell the death after that reborn. No where one can be hidden from death. Sutta Pitaka ...


1

Well, Fourier Transform makes an assumption that the function of life is a smooth enough object. It must be at least continuous, and is a lot better if it is differentiable a couple of times or more. In case of none smooth points (like transitions taking place in case of death or birth for example), it makes a lot more sense to use some other bases, like ...


1

To our knowledge, Nāgārjuna never shared a precise formula for calculating the Fourier transform precisely, so we have no way of gauging his understanding of that particular equation. The remarkable thing about Fourier transforms is that a "local" phenomenon such as a singleton wave can be equivalently represented by the sum of infinite waves of ...


1

Nāgārjuna was not a mathematician; he was an eminent buddhist philosopher. That is certainly enough, don't you think? There is an interesting parallel here, perhaps — maybe even a useful analogy, though one that would only be meaningful to people who understand Fourier transforms — but that's all. The claim inside the question asked is mere puffery (great ...


1

This answer is from the Theravada perspective. When you feel like you fear or dislike people because of their mental traps and neurotic dramas, you can use this opportunity to cultivate the brahmavihara of compassion (karuna). The primary purpose of cultivating compassion is to cure this strong aversion that you have of other people. Aversion or hatred (dosa ...


1

I have been recently experiencing tremendous fear, but as I look through my eyes at the world and the objects it contains, the fear does not accord with what I see. The scriptures say there can be valid fear and invalid fear. The scriptures say: 317. Those who see something to fear where there is nothing to fear, and see nothing to fear where there is ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible