Hot answers tagged

15

There is no sense of accumulating sins, per se; your karma (actions) change who you are; there is also no sense that it can ever be too much to recover from (eventually). Eventually, your karma will catch up with you, sending you to heaven or hell, and making it more difficult to accumulate further good or bad karma, until you usually wind up right back ...


12

I am a Rinzai Zen Monk with a decade-long monastic background so my answer will be relevant within our school's framework. From a Zen POV being 'reborn' exists only within Reality. Reality is purely this one moment here and now. With each breath, with each action we are reborn. The choices we make are fresh and new. The Enlightened being will make those ...


10

You are mixing up the monk's life with lay life. Lay people are only expected to follow the five precepts on regular days and the eight precepts on Poya days. So they can still get married and have children. You can still attain enlightenment while being a lay person. Visaka was a Sothapanna. But she married and had many children. A monk's life is more ...


10

Sounds like your realization of Emptiness is not complete. Evidently, there are still some leftover attachments in you, specifically attachment to Dharma. Have you read Choguyam Trungpa's work? "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism" comes to mind. Have you worked with live Zen teachers or with higher levels of Tantra? Integrating Samsara and Nirvana is not ...


8

I've been told by someone close to me that my meditation and desire to let go are very threatening to her. She sees sense desires, ego and attachments as very natural and wholesome, and my way of life as a threat or a questionable choice at the very least. If you mind your own business, and you don't preach/push other people into your way of thinking, it's ...


8

Let's consider Andrei's definition of Buddhism, for example (because it's a short and easy definition). Buddhists believe that human experiences originate in the mind, training which through cultivation of ethics, meditation, and wisdom leads to nirvana (the release from suffering) or enlightenment -- the insight into the true nature of things. ...


6

It's said that enlightened person feels single pain (only physical), while not enlightened feels two pains (physical with mental pain). SN 36.6, Sallatha Sutta: The discerning person, learned, doesn't sense a (mental) feeling of pleasure or pain: This is the difference in skillfulness between the sage & the person run-of-the-mill.


6

I’m not sure what you mean by six stages here. Actually, it seems that the rebirth/samsara concept was not that old when Buddhism came on the scene. Gananath Obeyesekere is an anthropologist who wrote a book about rebirth across a range of cultures. He begins by trying to situate the Buddhist idea of ethical rebirth in the history of Indian religion: I ...


6

First of all, saṃsāra is the cycle of birth and rebirth. Within this cycle there is an unceasing flow of consciousness - not to be identified with a person, though - that passes from existence to existence. The only way out of saṃsāra is nirvāṇa - this is your "dead end". To reach this state all accumulation of new karman has to stop and all accumulated ...


6

The Buddha explicitly declined to answer: Whether or not the cosmos is eternal Whether or not the cosmos is infinite Whether or not the Tathagata exists after death Cula-Malunkyovada Sutta And why are they undeclared by me? Because they are not connected with the goal, are not fundamental to the holy life. They do not lead to disenchantment, dispassion, ...


6

Samsara is a continuum of our individual mind moments. Dukkha is the deep down feeling that something is missing or wrong that occurs throughout Samsara.


6

The traditional Mahayana formula is that "Samsara is Nirvana". This is explained in depth in Madhyamaka literature. Here is one quote from Jay Garfield commentary on his translation of Nagarjuna's Mulamadhyamakakarika: It is [possible] to grasp after nirvana – to reify it as a state and to crave it as a phenomenon inherently different from samsara and as ...


6

Theravada Buddhist Perspective: After Nibana, can one be reborn again in Samsara? No, that is not possible. When reaching Nibbana one has destroyed all fetters. One has uprooted all defilements. There exists no longer Ignorance (Avijja) which binds beings to Samsara. One has freed oneself from the cycle of rebirth. If you attain Nibanna, can you be ...


5

Yes, there are approximate equivalent realms: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhist_cosmology Although, one thing to keep in mind is that the Buddha taught his followers not to speculate on cosmology, soul, or eternalism, since such speculation increases our suffering: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_unanswered_questions http://www.accesstoinsight.org/...


5

One main distinction is that Buddha pointed out that the Devas and Brahma has a finite life where at that time some were aiming to be born in these relms believing that these planes are eternal. Also another main distinction is that many believed in a eternal soul which is transmitted on death. Buddha rejected the existence of an everlasting soul ...


5

An enlightened person feels the sensation corresponding to pain, but it does not feel as pain, rather as pure (informational) sensation. My teacher taught me an exercise thanks to which I had this experience first-hand. It is called kuem chok in Korean (I'm probably misspelling it badly). kuem chok is performed by taking one of especially designed ...


5

According to Ven. Ajaan Tong, there are four things without limit: The knowledge of a Buddha, the world of beings, the universe, and space. The idea of a limited reality is more of a western concept, tied in with the Abrahamic religions which purport a creation and end. If anyone has any reference to the "four things without limit" that the Venerable sir is ...


5

I think that dukkha is the reason why the reader is looking for a way to stop the cycle. I think that, because the "four noble truths" were the first thing that the Buddha explained, during his first sermon after enlightenment (with dukkha being the subject of the first of these four noble truths). The fact that dukkha is the cause of the search (i.e. that ...


5

Samsara is just a word. There is seeing, hearing, tasting, feeling, smelling, and thinking. And there is the UN enlightened mind that misapprehends the true nature of these phenomenon. edit for your edit : does not exist but it exists for other beings in samsara? There are four things without bounds; the knowledge of a buddha, space, the universe, and ...


5

Being depressed and delusional are also normal. Being enlightened is what is not normal in the world. Becoming disappointed of sensual pleasures and wanting to figure out what is really going on around you is a good thing. It's a mild version of what prince Siddhartha felt before he left the lay life. It's called Nekkhamma Sankappa(a part of the right ...


4

The answer boils down to difference between Hinayana (~beginner's) and Mahayana (~advanced practitioner's) attitude. In beginner's mind, there is a strong conflict between Samsara of day-to-day life, and the peace of Nirvana. Buddhist practice is seen as a mean of cutting the fetters that keep reengaging one in the endless cycle of Samsara with its ...


4

According to the Buddhist cosmology, a human being has the best advantages to become enlighten. It is not intrinsically marked by extremes of happiness or suffering, but all the states of consciousness in the universe, from hellish suffering to divine joy to serene tranquility can be experienced within the human world. For being in the lower realms: ...


4

Even though it's a later answer I can't resist putting in something. I think it's fair to say that if you have children then you won't be able to meditate as much as you once did. Maybe not at all. Also you know that big shelf of Dharma books that you have, well you might not be reading many of those. That 10 day vipassana retreat you wanted to go on, well ...


4

The best option would be to keep following the noble eightfold path and observe the different path factors and the 5 precepts. This way you have your side of the coin clean and you are not pushing or preaching to her in any way. If she get's angry when seeing you meditate then that is her own doing. The untrained mind does not see reality for what it is. ...


4

What then are other reasons for seeking enlightenment apart from the emancipation from Samsara? In Samsara, the conditioned reality, everything exists due to causes and conditions. Mental and physical phenomena are constantly arising and ceasing. They are ever-changing, uncontrollable and oppressive. All conditioned phenomena follows a certain "order or ...


4

Samsara exists based on mind-matter phenomena. Any phenomena which is part of mind, mind content, matter comes under ultimate truths (truths that not fall apart under divisibility into its constituent components or indivisible). So it is an ultimate truth that samsara does exit when you are part of it if you are worldling. When you attain Nirvana which is ...


4

If you use "exists" in the Buddhist context, you might be understood as "has own, unconditioned essence" which is the traditional use -- here, the object in question cannot suddenly become or unbecome according to circumstances, because it always "is". Or as "is real / refers to an actual experience" which is the more popular understanding. Not being ...


4

Habits practiced over many lifetimes persist. Say there is monkey born as a monkey over 500 lifetimes and subsequently born human. The tendency to be a bit jumpy will persist. The other knowledge you cannot access unless you develop the ability to recall past life. This is not easy and developing these kind of abilities are not connected to the Buddhist ...


4

If you observe what is around you the right way you can make progress. Whatever you observe will be perceived as: desirable undesirable neither which results in: pleasure pain neutral. This is discussed in Sal-āyatana Vibhanga Sutta, Indriya Bhāvanā Sutta. When you experience any of these sensations you should remain equanimous and aware of the arising ...


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