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7

If matter is just illusion I don't think that is Buddhist doctrine. I think that Buddhist doctrine is that we tend to view matter inappropriately or with ignorance. what is the origin of it I'm not sure it has an origin. That might be considered an unanswered question. Several suttas (e.g. this one) mention "inconstruable beginning", saying "A beginning ...


6

According to the Abhidhamma, we don't "see a car". It is a bit more complicated :-) According to the Abhidhamma, sensing involves seeing a small patch of colour. The small patch of colour is rūpa, an ultimate reality. How small is this patch of colour? Extend your arm and hold out your thumb. Scientists say that the size of your thumbnail as compared to ...


5

Buddhism teaches the cessation of anger and hatred. Anger and hatred arise from a deep suffering inside of us, and we must learn to cool down this anger and erase the suffering. At this moment you suffer deeply because of what you heard, and this hurt has transformed into anger, and anger into hatred. It is not a pleasant feeling. But, it can be reversed. ...


5

In Buddhism we engage in 4 special prayer-like practices regarding other beings. They are called the Four Brahma Viharas or sometimes the Four Heavenly Abodes or Four Sublime States. They are: Love or Loving-kindness (metta) Compassion (karuna) Sympathetic Joy (mudita) Equanimity (upekkha) More information here: http://www.accesstoinsight....


5

There's no voodoo in Buddhism. Buddha preached his doctrine to help you get rid of hatred, greed and ignorance. Any curse or black magic is not a part of Buddhism, even if the lady ignorantly uses a Buddha statue for it. She only harms herself by being ignorant and disrespectful towards the Buddha.


5

When a meditator achieves e.g. the 5th jhana of infinite space, is he or she still in this world? Yes, he doesn't disappear. When you sleep, you are not aware of what's happening around you. But that doesn't mean the world is gone. Obviously the body is, but what about the mind? Yes, the mind is still associated with the body. Just that it's focusing ...


4

In traditional Hindu use of the words Rupa and Nama (in context of ontology), Rupa meant a configuration of matter and Nama meant a spirit or an identity embodied in that configuration. For example this particular combination of wooden planks is a Rupa, while the chair it embodies is a Nama. Even if some parts of the chair can get broken and replaced making ...


2

I think it is not correct to say "seeing of the car formation". When "you" see "a car" that is nama-rupa; it is just seeing - no doer nor object. The concept of "Car" is just mind-made. Yes rupa is the experience of hardness, softness etc. But when you see a car, can you "see" the hardness, softness etc? So rupa is not the ultimate reality.


2

The world itself was not an illusion to the Buddha. Rather, given the true nature of experience - Anatta and Anicca, the actions of 'I' making or 'Mine' making facilitate the illusion of a Self, hence the arising of Dukkha. The issue of origin for any thing that lacks a Self, like this existence, is that the beginning doesn't make sense. At best the ...


1

To explain it will take long long paragraph, but still not really explaining anything. To give some orientations relating to your question, first, you said "matter", what is matter? A duck, we say there is a duck (matter), it's shaped a duck-shape, yellow or green in colour, it quacks, it smells, it has soft downs, roasted duck tastes different from chicken. ...


1

If you look the chain of events that lead to one another in the Dependent Origination, you may conclude that just after 'contact' (the encounter between the senses, sense stimuli, and consciousness) we can experience by ourselves the mentioned processes in action. Feelings are the result of contact, and there are three general kinds (applied to each of the ...


1

Buddhism teaches about the five aggregates. One of the aggregates is feeling (vedana). Another aggregate is mental formations (sankhara). Due to a pleasant or unpleasant feeling sensations (vedana), the mental formations create the ideas or thoughts "I like it" & "I dislike it". Mental formations also brew up defilements (kilesa), such as love & ...


1

Certain subjects are declared to be imponderable by the Buddha: 1) range of powers of a Buddha 2) range of powers obtained while absorbed in jhana 3) precise working out of the results of karma 4) speculation about the origin (the first moment, purpose, etc.) of the cosmos The -origin of matter- question seems like it probably is the fourth ...


1

If matter is just an illusion what is the source of it The source cannot be found. One has to become a fully enlightened Buddha to be able to gain knowledge about its origin. Physical matter is not an illusion but rather like an illusion as it is empty of solidity, permanence. It exists in context of our experience. In reality what is percieved as matter ...


1

Buddhism does not state the external world of forms, such as the earth, is an illusion created by mind. For example: It would be better for the uninstructed run-of-the-mill person to hold to the body composed of the four great elements, rather than the mind, as the self. Why is that? Because this body composed of the four great elements is seen ...


1

This question makes no sense. The four elements are material & not related to pain. Pain is vedana kdhanda rather than rupa khandha. Venerable sir, might there be another way in which a bhikkhu can be called skilled in the elements?” There might be, Ānanda. There are, Ānanda, these six elements: the earth element, the water element, the fire ...


1

The 4 elements can only be sensed through the scene doors, hence in the stand point of a mediator the 4 elements are sensations too. Without a living observer there cannot be any scene of the elements, hence consciousness, faculty, contact, sensation are essential and any experience of the elements is always through sensations or the characteristics of the ...


1

No! Patavi, Apo, Tejo, Vayo are elements of Rupa. Pain is a sensation caused by those elements coming into contact with the sense doors while the the mind is present.


1

To continue this discussion further we must have an agreement of the (Dhamm) terms "Nama", "Rupa" and "Nama-Rupa" that we are using in this Question and answers. There are three things to consider. 1). The Basic materials (Rupa Dhatu)/(particles). 2). The material creation / Form/physical phenomena- (a car)(Nama-Rupa). 3). The Perception/ Mental Formations.-...


1

Here's my guess — however it's an unreferenced statement in Wikipedia. Reality in Buddhist sutras We can look at the concepts of impermanence and not-self in objective terms, for example by deconstructing the concept of an aggregated object such as a lotus and seeing that the flower is made up entirely of non-flower elements like soil, nutrients, ...


1

I'm sorry if this answer is ignorant but I think you're asking whether form has an existence independent of one's experience of it. Like asking, "If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?" My guess is that non-self (by which, I don't mean "they're not me", I mean "they are not themselves") implies that a form doesn'...


1

Well when you knock yourself against something hard? Do you feel the hardness? When you drop something from you hand because it is too hot or too cold to hold, do you feel the heat? Well rupa is made up of the 4 great elements (mahabhuta) of pathavi(earth element -hardness), apo (water element - cohesiveness), tejo(heat) and vayo (air element - motion). ...


1

Rupa is also known as the 1st aggregate - the aggregate of material form. Here are some notes on it by Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi: "...This includes all the material factors of existence, every type of material phenomena. The most important of these is the body, the physical organism through which one experiences the world. The Buddha analyses the aggregate of ...


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