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It really depends which definition of religion you go for. For instance Human recognition of superhuman controlling power and particularly of a personal God [..] Oxford English Dictionary. Buddhism is not a religion based on this definition Any specific system belief or worship, often involving a code of ethics and a philosophy Websters New World ...


9

According to Theravada Buddhism, fear is based on anger. As per the Visuddhimagga-Tika: na bhāyati ñāṇassa bhāyanākārena appavattanato. paṭighacittuppādavasena hi bhāyanaṃ, ñāṇaṃ pana bhāyitabbavatthuṃ bhāyitabbanti yāthāvato jānāti. It doesn't fear - because of the non-occurrence of the condition of fearing in this knowledge [knowledge of ...


9

Moksha and Nirvana are the same in that: The cycle of live, death and rebirth is broken once attained, one is free from Samsara It's attainable through practise Meditation techniques are employed in attaining both They differ in that: Moksha tends to explained as a merger with Atman, or Brahma which Buddhist don't believe. Their main philosophical ...


6

Buddhism is a framework implemented by religions. From my Mac's dictionary: framework |ˈfreɪmwəːk| noun • a basic structure underlying a system, concept, or text : the theoretical framework of political sociology. I'd add to that, that the main difference between a philosophy and a framework is that a framework provides or suggests tools/methods ...


6

In terms of general knowledge, it can be helpful to be familiar with the religions of the world on a basic level and there are many books which compare the world's religions in an easy format such as The Handy Religion Answer Book. Reading a book such as this gives an interesting glimpse into the vastness of the the world's religious traditions. Studying ...


5

My answer is simple but I know many here won't like it. Supply follows demand, active or passive. If you take frozen meat imagining that you did not kill the animal so it is okay, as suggested by some here, you are simply justifying your craving with left-handed logic. The animal was killed not only because someone openly demanded to eat flesh but also ...


4

You will be surprised, but Buddhism is that very same "philosophy that distinguishes between harmful and beneficial". The notions of kusala (good, skilfull, healthy, conducive to comfort) and akusala (bad, incompetent, unwholesome, conducive to trouble) are central to Buddhism: "Abandon what is unskillful (akusala), monks. It is possible to abandon what ...


4

(Disclaimer: Bear in mind this is just a way of seeing things, I have no interest in discussion since it belongs in the chat & this question is very much opinion based. Anyone can argue in which ever way they want and still be supported by references and\or experience.) Does it have to be one or another? Can't it be both? To me it seems a bit of both ...


4

I've struggled with this question myself. My opinion is that the problem stems from the fact that the notions of religion and philosophy are purely Western concepts. Religion, for instance, is term which originated in the Roman Empire, and was used by state powers to legitimize practices such as Judaism and later Christianity (Islam had not developed at the ...


4

Enlightenment like ice cream comes in different flavors, but in the end they are all ice cream, made from milk, cream and sugar. Examined with the intellect there are a lot of seeming differences, even within a single religion's idea of enlightenment - Bodhisattva or Arhat? Japanese Zen or Thai Theravada? Realizing the Atman or becoming a deva? Examined ...


4

The original answer saying that attaining personal wealth and mastery of sex is important for moksha is completely, 100% wrong and as a hindu I am extremely offended. Moksha and Nirvana are connected and the buddhist concept basically branches from the hindu concept of Moksha. Please please do not spread wrong knowledge about our religion. Moksha is a way to ...


4

I have been to Nepal on a retreat, it is a Hindu country, but there are many Buddhists. The main Buddhism there is Mahayana by far, with a large influence from Tibet (monks who escaped after the situation with China). Most of them do not eat meat (I spent days without eating meat there), but they used to eat eggs. You should ask, they will not be offended. ...


4

Buddhism has the idea of the three jewels: Buddha, Dharma, Sangha. You said "I believe in Buddha and his philosophy" so that's two of them, i.e. Buddha, and Dharma. There are parts e.g. in the Dhammapada which suggest it's better to be alone than with a fool: If for company you cannot find a wise and prudent friend who leads a good life, then, ...


4

When it is said that one's refuge "is broken whenever a person goes for refuge to a teacher outside the Buddha's Dispensation[...]" the meaning is that one should not go for ultimate refuge in anything but the three Jewels. It is Lama Je Tsongkhapa's interpretation. When one is sick, (1) fearing the suffering of illness and (2) trusting that the doctor can ...


3

I am convinced that any answer has to give a definition first of “scientific” and of “religion”. I consider “religion” a social phenomenon based on three pillars: doctrine, community and cult (see “Joachim Wach: Sociology of Religion”). Moreover, the doctrine should include the belief in one or more beings with superhuman power who affect the life of their ...


3

All religions have their philosophies (as metaphysics), so Buddhism is not an exception. Views are sometimes divided into naive, religious, and philosophy. Where philosophy is scientific, as opposed to the other two. In that sense, Buddhism is not strictly philosophy because it is not opposed to religion. On the other hand, for ancient people religion was ...


3

I hope I understand your question properly, as I try to answer it. Buddhism is about the cause of suffering, the cessation of suffering and the path of that cessation. So it's useful to those that do not want to suffer in the Buddhist sense of the word, and believe that the path of Buddhism can relieve them of that. Fear is not a requirement, one does not ...


3

I am very new to Buddhism, but the way I understand it thus far is as follows. I dont think there is a fear within Buddhism of hell or being sad, rather its recognizing the reality of this sadness and misery forming part of our daily lives. What Buddhism provides are various methods to cope with this fear and to rather see the truth behind the sadness, fear ...


3

Something that doesn't seem to have been covered so far. There is a perfectly legitimate fear or terror that comes right out of a practice that has made some progress in the development of mindfulness. It is the result of developing clarity into the transient nature of phenomena and thus an encouraging result. The deluded mind is a mind that ...


3

It depends on the individual. I've heard several people say it would be too confusing or wasteful. The analogy offered in Advaita Hinduism is that it is far better to dig one deep well than several shallow wells. In my personal experience the opposite is true, much to the chagrin of some spiritual friends and family. We must each obey whatever is our ...


3

Determine what you will say based on what you can learn from the other person with whom you are talking. Listen carefully to what they say and presume nothing about what they mean. Ask careful questions about what a religion is and see whether what you are part of is a religion by this meaning. You may discover that while Buddhism is a religion the Dharma is ...


3

I have to warn you that if you take refuge in the Three Jewels, and then go to other religions for guidance, there will be suffering (first noble truth). Well, even if you stick faithfully to Buddhism, there would still be suffering, but then you will learn how suffering is optional, depending on how you approach it. Why would there be suffering for ...


3

I read the book "The Power of Now" by Eckhart Tolle years ago and was impressed by it. After studying Buddhism, I came to discover that what Eckhart Tolle achieved was probably (I speculate) only the first or second level of jhana - the experience of bliss, rapture and the impermanent silencing of mind-noise. Many self-proclaimed saints probably claim to ...


3

Since the Kalamas were confused in what they should or not believe, The Buddha instructed that they should be pragmatic and adopt only views and conduct which would lead to their well-being and peace of mind insted of keep bothering themselves with unverifiable competing doctrines which would lead to nowhere but to stressful mind states. This is unrelated ...


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It is in ... AN 3.80. The Path of Purification, Six Recollection, Recollection into Buddha's Value.(Visuddhimagga ChaAnussatiNiddesa BuddhanussatiKatha). AbhidhammatthaVibhavini 5th Chapter. etc. Abhidhanappadipika is a Glossary explanation.


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