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Art can be a continuation of samsaric inertia, or it can be an expression of the enlightened mind. What message are you sending with your art? What impulse does it carry forward into the future?


6

From SN 7.16 - Paccanīka Sutta: At S›vatthı. Now on that occasion a brahmin named Paccanıkas›ta, Relisher of Contradiction, was residing at S›vatthı. Then it occurred to the brahmin Paccanıkas›ta: “Let me approach the ascetic Gotama and contradict whatever he says.” Now on that occasion the Blessed One was walking back and forth in the open. Then the ...


5

As mentioned in another answer the story as written is published in at least one book by Thich Nhat Hanh. The following is copied from Being Peace, it's slightly more elaborate than the version you posted (e.g. "velvet bag" instead of "little bag") but with many of the same phrases: Thay doesn't attribute a source for this story. The ...


5

"There are these eight grounds for the arousal of energy. Which eight? "There is the case where a monk has some work to do. The thought occurs to him: 'I will have to do this work. But when I am doing this work, it will not be easy to attend to the Buddha's message. Why don't I make an effort beforehand for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, ...


5

No. Fortune telling, astrology, palmistry, divination etc. are considered to be "animal" arts by the Buddha, which is forbidden to monks in DN 2 (quoted below). From DN 2: "Whereas some contemplatives & brahmans, living off food given in faith, maintain themselves by wrong livelihood, by such "animal" arts as: reading marks on ...


5

I would recommend Insight into Emptiness by by Khensur Jampa Tegchok and Thubten Chodron. This book discusses the tenets of all four of these schools and compares and contrasts them. Further, the authors are of the same branch of Tibetan Buddhism as His Holiness the Dalai Lama and the latter author also works very closely with the Dalai Lama and is a co-...


4

With many traditions and teachers to choose from, how should one figure out what is the true Dhamma? From AN 8.53 "Gotami, the qualities of which you may know, 'These qualities lead to passion, not to dispassion; to being fettered, not to being unfettered; to accumulating, not to shedding; to self-aggrandizement, not to modesty; to discontent, not to ...


4

In DN1, the Buddha explains in detail what he refrains from. Since you're an artist, you'll understand that art can be used to highlight beauty. Such art would foster clinging and prolong suffering by that attachment: DN1:1.16.1: ‘There are some ascetics and brahmins who, while enjoying food given in faith, still engage in beautifying and adorning ...


4

There is one reference for this in Dhammapada 155 - 156: Verse 155: They, who in youth have neither led the life of Purity nor have acquired wealth, waste away in dejection like decrepit herons on a drying pond deplete of fish. Verse 156: They, who in youth have neither led the Life of Purity nor have acquired wealth, lie helplessly like arrows that have ...


4

In MN116, Once upon a time, five hundred Buddhas awakened for themselves dwelt for a long time on this Isigili. They were seen entering the mountain, but after entering were seen no more. When people noticed this they said: ‘That mountain swallows these hermits!’ That’s how it came to be known as Isigili. desessāmi, bhikkhave, paccekabuddhānaṁ nāmāni. I ...


3

Śvetaketu and Bodhisattva in Sanskrit are Setaketu and Bodhisatta in Pali. There was one person called Setaketu in the Setaketu Jataka, but this is the story of a human on Earth, but I'm not sure if this is the same as Śvetaketu of the Chandogya Upanishad. In any case, this Setaketu is not a Bodhisatta. From this page, we find this story: And, having ended ...


3

How do you know that you have arrived at the true Dhamma? From MN 9: Ven. Sariputta said, "When a disciple of the noble ones discerns what is unskillful, discerns the root of what is unskillful, discerns what is skillful, and discerns the root of what is skillful, it is to that extent that he is a person of right view, one whose view is made straight, ...


3

“If you want to understand the causes that existed in the past, look at the results as they are manifested in the present. And if you want to understand what results will be manifested in the future, look at the causes that exist in the present” (“The Opening of the Eyes,” The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, vol. 1, p. 279).


3

In Smiling at Fear, in the chapter titled "Facing Yourself", Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche says: The only way to relax with yourself is to open your heart. Then you have a chance to see who you are. This experience is like opening a parachute. When you jump out of an airplane and open the chute, you are there in the sky by yourself. Sometimes it is ...


3

Nobody is going to punish you for your art. Art is not a crime. But in Buddha’s world the priorities are different. The number one priority is to end suffering. And for that purpose art is a distraction for those follow the Noble Eightfold Path. Most people do not understand the urgency of the matter. If you follow Buddha’s Dhamma then avoid painting and ...


3

The following is somewhat like the posted question, but not exactly: SN35.241:7.4: Sir, may I receive the going forth, the ordination in the Buddha’s presence?” SN35.241:7.5: “Well then, Nanda, return the cows to their owners.” SN35.241:7.6: “Sir, the cows will go back by themselves, since they love their calves.” SN35.241:7.7: “Still, Nanda, you should ...


3

From SN 15.14: At Sāvatthī. “Mendicants, transmigration has no known beginning. … It’s not easy to find a sentient being who in all this long time has not previously been your mother. Why is that? Transmigration has no known beginning. … This is quite enough for you to become disillusioned, dispassionate, and freed regarding all conditions.”


3

...They enjoy it and like it and find it satisfying. If they’re set on that, committed to it, and meditate on it often without losing it, when they die they’re reborn in the company of the gods of the dimension of infinite space. The lifespan of the gods of infinite space is twenty thousand eons. ...If they’re set on that, committed to it, and meditate on ...


3

AN 4.39, AN 4.40, DN 5 and also see MN 55 Then Ujjaya the brahmin went up to the Buddha, and exchanged greetings with him. When the greetings and polite conversation were over, he sat down to one side and said to the Buddha: “Does Master Gotama praise sacrifice?” “Brahmin, I don’t praise all sacrifices. Nor do I criticize all sacrifices. Take the kind of ...


3

'It cognizes, it cognizes': Thus, friend, it is said to be 'consciousness.' And what does it cognize? It cognizes 'pleasant.' It cognizes 'painful.' It cognizes 'neither painful nor pleasant.' 'It cognizes, it cognizes': Thus it is said to be 'consciousness.' - MN 43 And what, bhikkhus, is consciousness? There are these six classes of consciousness: eye-...


3

You're probably thinking about Dhammapada 155-156 (translated by Ven. Thanissaro): Neither living the chaste life nor gaining wealth in their youth, they waste away like old herons in a dried-up lake depleted of fish. Neither living the chaste life nor gaining wealth in their youth, they lie around, misfired from the bow, sighing over old times. ...


3

That's one of several translations of this Karaṇīyamatthakusalena, Yanta santaṃ padaṃ abhisamecca; Sakko ujū ca suhujū ca, Sūvaco cassa mudu anatimānī. They all translate it with the same word, "upright". The Pali word are ujū (straight), sakko (able/capable), and su- (good). Here is a dictionary definition: https://suttacentral.net/define/uju ...


3

Thinking is an essential activity, of course, and it's impossible to avoid doing any thinking. The key is balance between being centered in the activity of your mind and being centered in your body. The more time you spend feeling the feelings of your body, gradually the thinking activity will settle down a bit.


3

The website voice.suttacentral.net is designed for users with visual impairments. This website will let you search the suttas and it may be possible to read them with your braille device. For example, one can search for One thing can be developed. Voice is dedicated to accessibility for Early Buddhist Texts and translations hosted on SuttaCentral. Indeed, we'...


3

Subha is a nun who has gone forth to the holy life. She seems to make it quite obvious that she has completely cut-off all fetters. As she wonders the mango grove, a rogue taunts her with various seductions expressed through a ridiculous procession of flowery, poetic language and overly exuberant and flamboyant promises; forthright and persistent in his ...


3

Holding breath = assāsapassāse uparundhitvā Breath's beginning-middle-ending = Assāsādimajjhapariyosānaṃ You may use "Assasapassasanam antaram (in the middle of breath)", but it is "Holding breath" actually. It is abnormal for Anapanassati meditation.


3

That sounds like the simile in AN 3.130 below. This describes three types of individuals and their anger. Anger is a sankhara (volition, mental formation). "Monks, there are these three types of individuals to be found existing in the world. Which three? An individual like an inscription in rock, an individual like an inscription in soil, and an ...


3

From AN 9.34: Ven: Sariputta: “Reverends, extinguishment (Nibbana) is bliss! Ven. Udayi: “But Reverend Sāriputta, what’s blissful about it, since nothing is felt?” Ven. Sariputta: “The fact that nothing is felt is precisely what’s blissful about it. Sukha or happiness for an unenlightened person is experienced when encountering pleasant feelings (from the ...


2

Its referred to in the Phena Sutta (or Phena Pinduma Sutta) as follows, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu: Thus a monk, persistence aroused, should view the aggregates by day & by night, mindful, alert; should discard all fetters; should make himself his own refuge; should live as if his head were on fire — in hopes of the state with no falling away. ...


2

a collection of all sutta references to sleeping http://lucid24.org/sted/sleep/index.html The two most important passages occur in these two suttas: AN 3.16 shows the daily moment by moment typical routine, with sleep schedule. (about 4 hours a day sleeping is the typical amount for a monk) AN 7.61 teaches 7 methods to ward off drowsiness, with sleeping in ...


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