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From AN 9.34: Ven: Sariputta: “Reverends, extinguishment (Nibbana) is bliss! Ven. Udayi: “But Reverend Sāriputta, what’s blissful about it, since nothing is felt?” Ven. Sariputta: “The fact that nothing is felt is precisely what’s blissful about it. Sukha or happiness for an unenlightened person is experienced when encountering pleasant feelings (from the ...


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That sounds like the simile in AN 3.130 below. This describes three types of individuals and their anger. Anger is a sankhara (volition, mental formation). "Monks, there are these three types of individuals to be found existing in the world. Which three? An individual like an inscription in rock, an individual like an inscription in soil, and an ...


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Holding breath = assāsapassāse uparundhitvā Breath's beginning-middle-ending = Assāsādimajjhapariyosānaṃ You may use "Assasapassasanam antaram (in the middle of breath)", but it is "Holding breath" actually. It is abnormal for Anapanassati meditation.


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Well it is most certainly based on these passages; Take another mendicant who says: ‘I’ve developed the heart’s release by compassion. I’ve cultivated it, made it my vehicle and my basis, kept it up, consolidated it, and properly implemented it. Yet somehow the thought of harming still occupies my mind.’ They should be told, ‘Not so, venerable! … For it is ...


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I will constrain my answer to the second turning of the wheel of dharma - which is held to be of definitive meaning while the first and third are said to be of interpretive meaning - and answer from Nagarjuna's seminal Fundamental Verses for explaining the Prajñāpāramitā the Buddha's teachings from the Second Turning of the Wheel of Dharma. This exact ...


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The first sutta that came to mind is the Culavedalla Sutta where a very exquisite dialogue takes place between the nun Dhammadinna and the laymen Visakha. Here is the excerpt in question. Now, lady, how does emergence from the cessation of perception & feeling come about?" "The thought does not occur to a monk as he is emerging from the ...


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In the sutta quote from AN 6.51 below, Ven. Ananda explains how one learns, understands and remembers the teachings. Ānanda said this: “Reverend Sāriputta, take a mendicant who memorizes the teaching—statements, songs, discussions, verses, inspired exclamations, legends, stories of past lives, amazing stories, and classifications. Then, just as they learned ...


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