Hot answers tagged

6

If you both have: (1) compatible faith (sama,saddhā), (2) compatible virtue (sama,silā), (3) compatible charity (sama,cāgā), (4) compatible wisdom (sama,pannā). Sama,jivi Sutta 1 With the balance of probability, you will be born in the same plane, which increases the chance of meeting again. There is no guarantee through. This will make your current life ...


6

So Buddhism says a lot of things. One is that unhappiness is caused by "craving" i.e. by wanting things to be other than as they are (or by wanting impermanent things to continue) Another is that unhappiness is caused by various types of "self-view", for example, "I will die" or "I cannot have what I want" etc. One aspect of "self-view" is "comparison" -- ...


5

UPDATE based on the edited question with a suggested definition of karma. While it is true that the Buddha taught that each and every volitional action has specific consequences this is most definitely not in opposition to the fact that repeated actions based on volitional thoughts can be habit forming. Indeed, consequences of a karmic action can be that it ...


4

Imagine a camp fire that started in 1982. The original fuel has burned down but new fuel is regularly added. The overall shape and configuration of the fire in 2020 is somewhat reminiscent of the original 1982 fire but of course none of the material is the same. Now if we were to analytically separate the fire into several categories (skandhas) we would ...


3

A question like this calls for a certain amount of philosophizing, so forgive me if I reach past traditional teachings for a moment. It seems to me that people tend to approach the question of karma and rebirth from too solipsistic a perspective, thinking of it only in terms of the individual (egoic) self. I understand the motivation behind that: if I feel ...


3

Why have samvega (sense of urgency that death may strike) without believe in literal rebirth? You could argue it both ways. Why have sense of urgency if you will be reborn? On the other hand - Why have sense of urgency if you're not going anywhere? Dharma is called "Safe Bet". Whether there is literal rebirth or not, Liberation is deathless. Whether there ...


3

I dream of a world where the purpose of life is to help others. Reduce suffering and conflicts, nurture harmony and peace. In my dream, success is defined in terms of how much you helped others, especially by doing what you love. This way you are happy because you're doing what you love doing - and you are also helping others. In my dream, this is a life ...


3

Can it be immoral to kill a plant? It's contrary to the Vinaya for monks -- I don't know whether you consider that as implying that it's "immoral". DESTROYING VEGETATION The common belief at the time of the Buddha was that plants (and even soil) were 'one-facultied life.' Today we have ecologically 'green' beliefs that are often equivalent — at ...


3

OP: I know that the Buddha didn't answer metaphysical questions since it made no sense to him. He wanted to afaik limit/remove suffering as much as possible. No. The Buddha did not answer metaphysical questions because it confuses and bewilders the questioner. You are confused now, and it makes you scared and gives you suffering. The Buddha already ...


2

Work on testing the credibility of these assumptions: soul, I, me ,mine, "I am happy" etc. Practice Satipatthana meditation to get the answers you are looking for,


2

I don't know but perhaps I read that later schools (i.e. early schools but later than the Pali suttas) developed the doctrine of "store-house consciousness" -- ālāyavijñāna in Sanskrit -- as an answer to this question (i.e. to explain the phenomenon): ... and finally the fundamental store-house consciousness (ālāyavijñāna), which is the basis of the other ...


2

Questions of King Milinda say, "it is nama-rupa that is reborn". When the King asks whether it is the same nama-rupa, Nagasena says, it is not the same, but this nama-rupa arises in causal continuity with the previous nama-rupa, and thus we talk about "rebirth". Questions of King Milinda also compare rebirth to a memorized verse passing from one person to ...


2

I knew someone who was diagnosed as psychotic for most of her adult life. Psychiatric medicines were semi-effective in her case (so the psychiatrist called her "one of the lucky ones"), so apparently the symptoms were brain-related -- even if etiology is too complicated i.e. physical and environmental. A couple of comments based on that... It took years ...


2

According to Buddhist cosmology (which is based on Hindu cosmology) rebirth as a human is special. It is only as a human you can contemplate "why not live a normal life", as the human realm is the only one on the wheel of rebirth from which buddhahood is attainable: Rebirth as a Deva means you're too ecstatic to contemplate Nirvana Rebirth as an Asura means ...


2

Restore yourself with Metta. I'm also at your age, in the same situation, thinking about how to regain my youth. Metta meditation gave me an understanding of this particular issue. In our youth, we had a much better positive attitude toward all human beings. There was much less negativity in our life. This was the cause of our beautiful life in your youth! ...


2

Personnal experience is a good way to learn. From what i understand, buddhism isn't based on blind faith, so experience is an excellent teacher in that sense. Although i won't quote any buddhist text, i don't think you need to see past lives to understand karma. Anyone has experienced hatred, selfishness, and the following results on the mind. Actions born ...


2

There is no difference in manner or extent between the rebirth we experience from moment to moment and the rebirth we experience from life to life. To misunderstand this is to misunderstand the subtlest meaning of the Buddha's teachings on emptiness or anatta. Therefore, think about what this means for your question. When an enlightened one first becomes ...


2

OP: Are the Skandha's reborn from moment-to-moment? Yes. Viññāṇapaccayā nāma-rūpaṃ, “dependent on consciousness arises mentality-materiality.” The term nāma here stands for the mental states (cetasika), in other words, the three mental groups: namely, feeling (vedanākkhandha), perception (saññākkhandha), and volitional or mental formations (...


2

Then the Exalted One, taking up a little dust on the tip of his finger-nail, said to the monks: "Now what think ye, monks? Which is the greater, this little dust I have taken up on the tip of my finger-nail, or this mighty earth?" "Greater, lord, is this mighty earth. Exceeding small is this little dust taken up on the tip of the Exalted One's fingernail:...


2

One of the lessons Buddhism teaches is that everything is impermanent. Our thoughts, our feelings, our emotions, our bodies, our life. Everything. We are surrounded by death. We are mortals. There is an end to this. However, Buddhism also has the concept of rebirth. Actually think about it, rebirth is there due to impermanence. For if one dies and there's ...


2

There are too many possible, different interpretations of "rebirth" for there to be an authoritative answer on this. Secular Buddhism, the most modern iteration, says that genes and matter from one organism are eventually recycled into the species and ecosystem; as genes are passed to posterity and the body decays and is re-absorbed by other living ...


2

What do you think of this story? Was I wrong the first time? The second? I think these questions are displaying concern for what others might think. There's a risk that it contributes to throwing us off balance: Now, gain arises for a well-instructed disciple of the noble ones. He reflects, 'Gain has arisen for me. It is inconstant, stressful, & ...


2

Wrong second time. First time there is no factor of intention, second time you wanted him to die for whatever reason. Take a hypothetical example of a person who is unable to kill another intentionally, it being not in his range he couldn't have done it. If not killing is classed categorically as good then the person who doesn't kill can not be blamed for ...


2

Piya Tan says, though I'm not sure this is clear, “Old karma” here refers to the six senses. The theme of “old karma” (purana,kamma) is applied to the body (synonymous with the six senses) in the (Kaya) Na Tumha Sutta (S 12.37/2:64 f), where the Anguttara Commentary explains that the body is not “old karma” but because it arises from old karma, it is ...


2

Most who are born in the human world will wait in a mind-made body waiting for a suitable place to be born. However it is not a birth or an existence. You can learn more from this Noble Eight-Fold Path Meditation: https://youtu.be/vu0UZDb3gKk?list=PLk22Pmbx-cNPA_vMHe4G9LOZaPm8GGpM_&t=5790 However the goal here is to understand the suffering nature of ...


2

Bhava means birth, arising. While the aggregates are arising, born, they are being (Bhava) and being conditioned. AN 3.47:1.6 SaṅkhataLakkhaṇaSutta: “Mendicants, conditioned phenomena have these three characteristics. What three? Arising is evident, vanishing is evident, and change while persisting is evident. These are the three characteristics of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible