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6

I think of karma, seeds of karma, and fruits of karma as individual's action, latent effects of such action, and individual experience resulting from past action, correspondingly. Nothing more, nothing less. I don't read any unscientific mumbo-jumbo into these concepts, purely cause-and-effect. I think of rebirth as a type of karmic process that spans ...


5

According to this Jainpedia page on Jain teachings on karma: The karmas accrued over a lifetime trap the soul in the cycle of births. The karmas mature by affecting the soul or the physical body of its next lifetime or birth. When the body dies, the soul is born in a different body, which is shaped by karmas from the previous birth and the ones before that. ...


4

This is not exactly "Buddhist scripture or commentary" but it's related -- What nurses need to know about Buddhist perspectives of end-of-life care -- here's an extract but you might read it all: Taking into consideration overall well-being (including the mental state of the patient), nurses must balance the level of pain relief needed against the ...


3

'Kamma' means 'intentional action' therefore is never 'figurative'. As for the word 'rebirth' meaning 'reincarnation', there appears no equivalent Pali word in the original scriptures. Therefore what is actually 'figurative' is the idea of a 'rebirth after the ending of life'. In original Buddhism, the literal meaning of 'death' ('marana') & 'following ...


3

Renunciation in Buddhism is related to going forth from the lay or householder life to life as a monk or nun. It doesn't apply to lay people renouncing property or inheritance. In fact, lay people are advised to manage their finances well. There is good discussion in this article, this article and this article. You can read those for much advice. For ...


3

Alas, the maze you spoke of is large and different people are stuck in different parts. That's why I asked, "Forget for a moment the idea of reincarnation (or rebirth) from life-to-life and instead concentrate on the situation in this very life and apply the following three concepts: anatta, rebirth (from moment-to-moment), and karma. In your mind, can ...


3

What exactly is rebirth? And what exactly is death? Most people take rebirth to be the rebirth of oneself into a new life. If we zoom further into what this means, this is the continuation of the same consciousness that is aware of its surroundings and its thoughts into a new body with a new identity and new life. The same consciousness from birth wandered ...


2

Bhava means birth, arising. While the aggregates are arising, born, they are being (Bhava) and being conditioned. AN 3.47:1.6 SaṅkhataLakkhaṇaSutta: “Mendicants, conditioned phenomena have these three characteristics. What three? Arising is evident, vanishing is evident, and change while persisting is evident. These are the three characteristics of ...


2

Most who are born in the human world will wait in a mind-made body waiting for a suitable place to be born. However it is not a birth or an existence. You can learn more from this Noble Eight-Fold Path Meditation: https://youtu.be/vu0UZDb3gKk?list=PLk22Pmbx-cNPA_vMHe4G9LOZaPm8GGpM_&t=5790 However the goal here is to understand the suffering nature of ...


2

The second? I met a pigeon this year which was crippled with an illness. I gave it shelter, food, and water, for about 10 days until it died. I figure that was maybe kinder than trying to kill it when it was helpless. If so, how can I mitigate this bad kamma? "Stop doing it" -- see this answer which quotes SN 42.8. And finally, how can we help him ...


2

Why your question and all the other similar questions you linked are not getting a direct answer, but a shuffle is because the Buddha did not give an answer for such questions. You may read many shuffles here, but the truth is questions such as Begining of life, end of life (i.e. beginner and end of Samsara); or hypothetical scenario in which all sentient ...


2

Who is that "we" which is trapped? It seems to me that these questions are based on the assumption of an "I" who can be found separated from the conditions that made the perception of "I" or the constituents of beings possible. There seems to be a differenciation between the "we" and the "trap". If the ...


2

Wrong second time. First time there is no factor of intention, second time you wanted him to die for whatever reason. Take a hypothetical example of a person who is unable to kill another intentionally, it being not in his range he couldn't have done it. If not killing is classed categorically as good then the person who doesn't kill can not be blamed for ...


2

It is very clear that the english word 'rebirth' in Buddhist writing and practice causes a whole host of confusions and misunderstandings. This is evident in this forum with the myriad questions and debates that have erupted as a consequence. As an added complexity, not all of the confusions and misunderstandings are related or easily dispelled in the same ...


2

I will comment more later and provide sutta quotes. Initial points: As said in the question, there appears no commonly used equivalent to punarjanma (puna-jati) in the Pali, apart from "dukkhā jāti punappunaṃ" found in Dhammapada 153. However, the meaning of "dukkhā jāti punappunaṃ" depends on the meaning of the word "jati". It ...


2

Good question, well thought out and described in detail. Your proposal 're-becoming' may be better than the other words, at not implying an immutable soul underlying, compared to 're-birth' and 're-incarnation', 'transmigration', etc. But it has its problems as well. The biggest one being that it doesn't easily convey you're talking about rebecoming after a ...


2

Dhammapada 153 - 154 in Pali: Anekajātisaṃsāraṃ, sandhāvissaṃ anibbisaṃ; Gahakāraṃ gavesanto, dukkhā jāti punappunaṃ. Gahakāraka diṭṭhosi, puna gehaṃ na kāhasi; Sabbā te phāsukā bhaggā, gahakūṭaṃ visaṅkhataṃ; Visaṅkhāragataṃ cittaṃ, taṇhānaṃ khayamajjhagā. Translation of Dhammapada 153 - 154 by Ven. Buddharakkhita: Through many a birth in samsara have I ...


2

In suttas Buddha uses two kinds of language. One language employs worldly concepts such as rebirth. Another language introduces technical concepts such as Dependent Origination. The first type of language is very simplistic and is meant for beginners, the technical language is much more precise and is meant for advanced students.


2

Anatta is a difficult and often misunderstood concept. When Buddhists talk about no-self, they mean it in the context of self-conceptualization: a mental object that is identified as the 'self'. In other words, we construct a mental object that we identify as ourself, and fall into the trap of thinking that mental construct is the reality, not a creation. '...


2

do the Pali words “āgacchati” and “paccājāyati” mean “reborn”? The PTS dictionary translates "paccājāyati" as "reborn". Apparently that's the prefix Pati -- which has many meanings (or usages), including "a second time"; and Jayati which is translated "to be born, to be produced, to arise, to be reborn". Jati is one of ...


2

I haven't found a quote about disagreement between Buddhist schools on rebirth, but I found this 1998 lecture by Johannes Bronkhorst entitled "Did the Buddha Believe in Karma and Rebirth?". Perhaps you're thinking about Pudgalavada. From the Atman (Buddhism) wikipedia article: According to Johannes Bronkhorst, it is possible that "original ...


1

As with all of my questions, I am seeking a person who has experienced and truly knows the answer. Hopefully, and with respect I am not seeking mere recital of texts ☺️ I prefer people speaking from experience. It’s one thing to learn from an ancient text, and completely different to learn from another who has come to experience the truth the text was ...


1

Good householder, also here, wanted to become here, take birth and hold on existance. Neither did one really call him, and even if, it would be finally his decision, nor was and is/could he be forced. So nobody else in charge of being bound then oneself at first place. Good householder will maintain himself here as long there are left merits to do so and as ...


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The question is about common interpretations of AN 4.123.


1

If you assume no 'I' or '' mine', no rebirth. If you assume 'I' or 'mine', rebirth makes sense. The universe is empty, energy can only change forms. So for 'now', everywhere sums up to 0. Flip 90 degrees, so for 'here' (I), everywhen sums up to 0. This is kamma-vipaka. All action has entirely linear consequences overall. Good = good, bad = bad. This way, ...


1

I don't know if you're familiar with psychology, but there's a theory there called the "Cycle of Violence", which holds that violent acts repeat themselves. They don't just repeat themselves within relationships — as each person in turn takes revenge or retribution for the other's violent behavior — but repeat across society as people turn their ...


1

You are looking at karma and rebirth as having two different perspectives - figurative/ metaphorical or literal. There's another two ways to look at this - "there is a self" and "all phenomena is not self". If there is a self, you would think that the person who committed some action, would experience its results. If there is a self, this ...


1

In the essay "To Suffer Is an Active Verb", Thanissaro Bhikkhu wrote: This is one of the reasons why the Buddha doesn’t have us try to go back into the past and ask, “What did I do to deserve an illness, a mental state, a situation in life?” He said that if you tried to trace all those things back, you’d go crazy. In fact, he said, you can’t trace ...


1

Many new to Buddhism are stuck into these matters and created a feeling of discomfort, including myself. But when I longer study Buddhism, it leads me to study something easier to understand like Karma in current life instead of past life. I.e. how to utilize the SWOT analysis soft skill? If you are talking about past life, likely it will lead to past life ...


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