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6

So Buddhism says a lot of things. One is that unhappiness is caused by "craving" i.e. by wanting things to be other than as they are (or by wanting impermanent things to continue) Another is that unhappiness is caused by various types of "self-view", for example, "I will die" or "I cannot have what I want" etc. One aspect of "self-view" is "comparison" -- ...


5

If you both have: (1) compatible faith (sama,saddhā), (2) compatible virtue (sama,silā), (3) compatible charity (sama,cāgā), (4) compatible wisdom (sama,pannā). Sama,jivi Sutta 1 With the balance of probability, you will be born in the same plane, which increases the chance of meeting again. There is no guarantee through. This will make ...


4

In my understanding, everything Nagarjuna talks about endlessly revolves around one theme - that is of imputation and reification of abstractions, which leads to confusion of the phenomenological with the ontological, which leads to conflicts, and suffering. As was customary in the ancient times he goes over endless examples of the same kind of argument over ...


3

Yes, rebirth can ONLY be ended through the practice of the Noble Eight Fold Path. No other way. Nutriment is four fold: Physical nutriment (kabaḷīkārāhāro) - the edible food as well as a person or object we take as "beauty", Contact as nutriment (phasso āhāro), Mental Volition as nutriment (manosañcetanāhāro) and Consciousness as nutriment (viññāṇāhāro). ...


3

There is no contradiction between MN 38 and Abhidhamma. Stream of consciousness OR Continuity of consciousness means individual consciousness which arises (uppada), exists (titi), ceases (bhanga) rapidly as an effect of many causes. It's just a stream, not a long lasting single one. Think of a stream of water. When you look at a single point in the stream, ...


3

So, how does the Abhidhamma reconcile the concept of re-linking consciousness (patisandhi-viññana) with MN 38 above? It doesn't have to because Abh. and MN 38 talked about different consciousnesses. "Consciousness" is a very broad term and require specific context for a specific meaning. And this is why the Buddha specifically asked Ven. Sati: "What is that ...


3

I dream of a world where the purpose of life is to help others. Reduce suffering and conflicts, nurture harmony and peace. In my dream, success is defined in terms of how much you helped others, especially by doing what you love. This way you are happy because you're doing what you love doing - and you are also helping others. In my dream, this is a life ...


3

35 years old is young. The Buddha attained enlightenment at 35 years old and lived teaching others the path to enlightenment for the next 45 years. The Buddha passed away at 80 years old. Also, most if not all of the Buddha's famous enlightened disciples, such as Kondanna, Maha Kassapa, Sariputta and Maha Moggallana, were older than the Buddha therefore ...


2

These three types of death are commonly referred to by the Theravada commentaries (e.g. AN-a 1.18 aparāccharāsaṅghātavaggavaṇṇanā). A description of them is found in the Vibhaṅga commentary: Tattha ‘khaṇikamaraṇaṃ’ nāma pavatte rūpārūpadhammānaṃ bhedo. ‘Tisso mato, phusso mato’ti idaṃ ‘sammutimaraṇaṃ’ nāma. Khīṇāsavassa appaṭisandhikā kālakiriyā ‘...


2

Indeed puthujjanas knows that it makes no sense to ask where a fire go once it is put out, unless those puthujjana managed to create a fantasy where they deify fire..., so the buddha says that It makes zero senses to ask where an arhant goes, or if an arhant exists after parinibbana, by creating a parallel between fire and craving (or fire and existence). ...


2

As used here, the question "Why?" has a bit of a foundation in Identity View. There is an implied question of "Why am I suffering this kamma?". A key assumption of identity view is that there is an essential self that exists in our body. It would be this "self" that generates kamma through contact, feeling, craving, rebirth and suffering. It would be this "...


2

How would a Buddhist explain this? There're different ways and different explanations, depending on who you ask. Asking a doctor and s/he'll probably gives an explanation based the patient's history of smoking, alcohol usage, maybe some genetic/environmental factors, etc. Asking a fitness instructor, maybe the explanation would be something related to the ...


2

The way my teacher taught me, he said most (but not all) illnesses are karmic results of attachments. In his explanations, these attachments are often tendencies that are passed from generation to generation - from parents to children. So most diseases have roots in attachments that ran strong in previous generations of the family. In my teacher's ...


2

The 6th fetter's meaning pretty straightforward: the craving for the fine-material (or form) existence/Rupa-Raga. The lower 5 fetters are lower because they're all related to our world, which is the sensuous world (Kama-Loka), while the 5 higher fetters are those that are tie to the 2 higher worlds above Kama-Loka: Rupa-Loka (form or fine-material world), ...


2

The desire to live a good life with ambition, and be reborn into another good life, is due to the craving for existence (bhava tanha). The desire to die as soon as possible, and not be reborn, is due to the craving for non-existence (vibhava tanha). The idea of rebirth or non-rebirth is different from the desire for rebirth or non-rebirth. Ideas are merely ...


2

There is no 'rebirth' (aka 'reincarnation') but kamma (the idea of 'agent' doing & reaping) is eradicated by the path. This means if the path is not realised, 'the agent' experiences the results of their actions even if there is no rebirth (reincarnation). However, 'an agent' experiencing the results of their actions is what 'rebirth' really means. '...


2

According to DutiyaSāriputta Sutta (SN 55.5), one of the conditions for stream entry is hearing or learning the Dhamma from someone already acquainted with it. https://suttacentral.net/sn55.5/en/sujato From that, you could say that get out of the cycle of suffering and narrow-minded ignorance it depends on the change of outer conditions, which may lead ...


2

Q1: What does cessation of form through the noble eightfold path mean? Form is one of the grasping aggregates. With relishing, it grows (see SN12.64). For example, first we like cake, then we like chocolate cake better, then we like dark chocolate cake even better. The forms grow elaborately. With cessation of form, we only see nutriment for the physical ...


2

The Buddha is like a doctor (Iti 100) who treats the illness which is suffering (dukkha). A lay beginner who still has self view (sakkāya ditthi) i.e. someone who is not yet a stream entrant, may need a different medicine compared to someone who is more advanced. For a beginner with self view, the Buddha prescribed the following medicine: Taking refuge in ...


2

The law of Kamma is that one’s actions will have consequences. A natural extension of the law of Kamma is the validity of the rebirth process (samsara). It is because the result of a kamma can bear fruits in this life or in future lives. We will continue to acquire kamma seeds (good or bad) that can lay dormant for a long time until conditions become right ...


2

The arising and cease of the aggregates (form, feelings, perception, mental formations and consciousness) occurs everytime contact happens. When contact occurs, new feelings, perceptions and consciousness arise, which are affected by the previous mind-states. As a result, mental formations are altered as well. And form is not the exception: with contact, ...


2

Questions of King Milinda say, "it is nama-rupa that is reborn". When the King asks whether it is the same nama-rupa, Nagasena says, it is not the same, but this nama-rupa arises in causal continuity with the previous nama-rupa, and thus we talk about "rebirth". Questions of King Milinda also compare rebirth to a memorized verse passing from one person to ...


2

I don't know but perhaps I read that later schools (i.e. early schools but later than the Pali suttas) developed the doctrine of "store-house consciousness" -- ālāyavijñāna in Sanskrit -- as an answer to this question (i.e. to explain the phenomenon): ... and finally the fundamental store-house consciousness (ālāyavijñāna), which is the basis of the other ...


2

Restore yourself with Metta. I'm also at your age, in the same situation, thinking about how to regain my youth. Metta meditation gave me an understanding of this particular issue. In our youth, we had a much better positive attitude toward all human beings. There was much less negativity in our life. This was the cause of our beautiful life in your youth! ...


1

Reading Anattā and Rebirth by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu, it ends with, We can conclude by saying that if you understand anattā correctly and truly, then you will discover for yourself that there is no rebirth and no reincarnation. The matter is finished. Previous fragments of the talk included: If right here, right now, there is no soul, person, self, ...


1

Buddhadasa taught "literal rebirth" is something mental, in the here-&-now. Since the Pali word "jati" ("birth") literally refers to something mental, why would the superstitious speculative idea occur that an imaginary "physical rebirth" is "literal"? The word 'birth' ('jati') refers to the production of 'beings' (per SN 12.2). Suttas such as SN 23.2, ...


1

There is no such thing as personal continuity, apart from new arisings of a similar delusions about 'self'. 'Re-birth' is merely the re-arising of another delusion of 'self'. Since not all Buddhists are enlightened, naturally all Buddhists do not agree on a single explanation. For example, the self 'Lazy Lubber' considers them 'self' to be today is not the ...


1

Wrong view can cause long repetition of bad existences, yes. So look always to straighten right view. to learn about what is right view and to stop ponder around about kamma, since such is one cause of getting "crazy". Beest right here and now! (Its not given for your trades, stacks and to maintain exchanges, but as a tiny emergency exit out of the wheel ...


1

According to Buddhism there is nothing to be taken as a self, soul, I, me or mine. What is mistaken as a 'self' is a sequence of momentary experiences/actions/events occurring and ending one after the other. Each of these experiences has two aspects to it. The physical aspect and the mental aspect. The mental aspect is subdivided into 4 categories. Hence the ...


1

"According to Buddhism, one's self is made of 5 agregates.", maybe according to whom's ever Buddhism and Buddhists, but the Buddha did not told such. More: he repeatedly stressed out that ones own can not be found in the five aggregates. As for what is birth: "And what is birth? Whatever birth, taking birth, descent, coming-to-be, coming-forth, ...


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