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6

Detailed description of the rebirth process appeared in the Garbhāvakrānti Sutra and the Abhidharmakośa, with the former being written first. AFAIK, both of these texts are significant in Tibetan traditions. "Lustfully drawn" is sexual attraction, judging from the relevant passage in the Abhidharmakośa provided by José Cabezón: The eyes [of the ...


5

According to this Jainpedia page on Jain teachings on karma: The karmas accrued over a lifetime trap the soul in the cycle of births. The karmas mature by affecting the soul or the physical body of its next lifetime or birth. When the body dies, the soul is born in a different body, which is shaped by karmas from the previous birth and the ones before that. ...


4

What exactly is rebirth? And what exactly is death? Most people take rebirth to be the rebirth of oneself into a new life. If we zoom further into what this means, this is the continuation of the same consciousness that is aware of its surroundings and its thoughts into a new body with a new identity and new life. The same consciousness from birth wandered ...


3

This is not exactly "Buddhist scripture or commentary" but it's related -- What nurses need to know about Buddhist perspectives of end-of-life care -- here's an extract but you might read it all: Taking into consideration overall well-being (including the mental state of the patient), nurses must balance the level of pain relief needed against the ...


3

What is rebirth? When most people think of rebirth, they think the permanent consciousness that has existed from childhood will continue into another life. They think consciousness is self. However, the Buddha taught that consciousness is impermanent, constantly changing and is dependently originated. This is found in MN 38: Then he went to the Blessed One ...


3

Alas, the maze you spoke of is large and different people are stuck in different parts. That's why I asked, "Forget for a moment the idea of reincarnation (or rebirth) from life-to-life and instead concentrate on the situation in this very life and apply the following three concepts: anatta, rebirth (from moment-to-moment), and karma. In your mind, can ...


2

do the Pali words “āgacchati” and “paccājāyati” mean “reborn”? The PTS dictionary translates "paccājāyati" as "reborn". Apparently that's the prefix Pati -- which has many meanings (or usages), including "a second time"; and Jayati which is translated "to be born, to be produced, to arise, to be reborn". Jati is one of ...


2

Taking a Theravada view, the immaterial realms - what you call formless - occur when a practitioner dies whilst dwelling in one of the four arupa ayatanas: The dimension of the perception of space The dimensions of the perception boundless consciousness The dimensions of the perception of nothingness The dimension of neither perception nor non-perception ...


2

Anatta is a difficult and often misunderstood concept. When Buddhists talk about no-self, they mean it in the context of self-conceptualization: a mental object that is identified as the 'self'. In other words, we construct a mental object that we identify as ourself, and fall into the trap of thinking that mental construct is the reality, not a creation. '...


2

In suttas Buddha uses two kinds of language. One language employs worldly concepts such as rebirth. Another language introduces technical concepts such as Dependent Origination. The first type of language is very simplistic and is meant for beginners, the technical language is much more precise and is meant for advanced students.


2

Dhammapada 153 - 154 in Pali: Anekajātisaṃsāraṃ, sandhāvissaṃ anibbisaṃ; Gahakāraṃ gavesanto, dukkhā jāti punappunaṃ. Gahakāraka diṭṭhosi, puna gehaṃ na kāhasi; Sabbā te phāsukā bhaggā, gahakūṭaṃ visaṅkhataṃ; Visaṅkhāragataṃ cittaṃ, taṇhānaṃ khayamajjhagā. Translation of Dhammapada 153 - 154 by Ven. Buddharakkhita: Through many a birth in samsara have I ...


2

Good question, well thought out and described in detail. Your proposal 're-becoming' may be better than the other words, at not implying an immutable soul underlying, compared to 're-birth' and 're-incarnation', 'transmigration', etc. But it has its problems as well. The biggest one being that it doesn't easily convey you're talking about rebecoming after a ...


2

I will comment more later and provide sutta quotes. Initial points: As said in the question, there appears no commonly used equivalent to punarjanma (puna-jati) in the Pali, apart from "dukkhā jāti punappunaṃ" found in Dhammapada 153. However, the meaning of "dukkhā jāti punappunaṃ" depends on the meaning of the word "jati". It ...


2

It is very clear that the english word 'rebirth' in Buddhist writing and practice causes a whole host of confusions and misunderstandings. This is evident in this forum with the myriad questions and debates that have erupted as a consequence. As an added complexity, not all of the confusions and misunderstandings are related or easily dispelled in the same ...


2

Reincarnation as you describe it, is scientifically unproven. It is also, speaking as a scientist and someone who has studied & researched Buddhism for almost 30 years now, IMHO irrelevant to the central teaching of Buddhism, which is experiential. Buddhism and science agree on many aspects of how the brain and the mind operate. The meditative practice ...


2

I haven't found a quote about disagreement between Buddhist schools on rebirth, but I found this 1998 lecture by Johannes Bronkhorst entitled "Did the Buddha Believe in Karma and Rebirth?". Perhaps you're thinking about Pudgalavada. From the Atman (Buddhism) wikipedia article: According to Johannes Bronkhorst, it is possible that "original ...


2

In SN 15.5, SN 15.6, an individual monk and in SN 15.8, an individual brahmin lay person, spoke to the Buddha, and asked a question about the length of an eon. The Buddha answered it and then reflected on how samsara (translated by Ven. Sujato as "transmigration") has been going on for a very long time, with an unknown beginning, and tells the ...


2

I get the impression that a "human" birth is seen as the best for gaining enlightenment: A lower birth (e.g. animal, ghost, hell) has too little ability -- not enough intelligence, or too much unrelenting suffering A higher birth has too little need -- no desire for enlightenment, renunciation, liberation -- like if everything seems heavenly, or ...


2

In a prior life, Venerable Mahāmoggallāna was known as Dūsī. Dūsī was prone to negative thoughts. And those negative thoughts led to negative speech: MN50:12.4: “Come, all of you, abuse, attack, harass, and trouble the ethical mendicants of good character. And those negative thoughts pursued further led to negative action: MN50:21.1: Then Māra Dūsī took ...


1

rebirth consists of new moments in our life being produced by previous moments functioned as causes. the final moment of mind in this lifetime functions as a cause for the first moment of mind in the next life. this process continues due to misapprehing an enduring self-sufficient self to your person. persons exist. an impossible self does not exist.


1

The doctrine of non-self applies and is equally true and valid for all of the three times: the past, the present, and the future. Your questions presuppose that there is a difference in the manner and extent of the fact of rebirth from moment-to-moment in this very life vs from life-to-life. They also presuppose that the doctrine of non-self is similarly ...


1

I'm pretty sure it's possible to have really bad karma and get enlightened anyway. There is a famous story of someone that killed many persons and got enlightened on that same life (though I think they end up killing him because of his past). The story should be easy to find, he was called Angulimala. And I think it wouldn't be possible to accumulate ...


1

This is out of scope for Buddhism SE. This is more like a history question. The Buddhist texts describe Charvaka as being materialist. Sarva-Darsana-Samgraha describes Charvaka as being both materialist and hedonist, but some scholars (especially Bhattacharya) say there's insufficient evidence to claim that Charvaka was hedonist. The explanation of the ...


1

When you feel a breeze on your skin, where does the breeze come from? Is there a single time or place where we can say "The breeze started here"? Is there a group of air molecules such that we can say "These molecules (and no others) are the breeze"? A breeze comes from everywhere and nowhere. It is the culmination of all the movements of ...


1

From Milindapanha: -- “What is it, Nàgasena, that is reborn?” -- “Mind and matter (namarupa).” -- “Is it this very mind and matter that is reborn?” -- “No, it is not, but by this mind and matter deeds are done and because of those deeds another mind and matter is reborn; but that mind and matter is not thereby released from the results of its previous deeds....


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...we should at least hope for additional evidence, better controlled experimentation, showing that it is possible to recover memories that are not encoded in neural tissue, that it is possible to sustain consciousness in organisms that lack nervous systems, that it is possible for mental causation to cross time and space and alter physical substrates. ...


1

The Four Noble Truths talk about suffering. That there is suffering, the cause of suffering, the cessation of suffering and the way to end suffering permanently. It's not about the cycle of rebirth. Please read this answer to understand what suffering is in Buddhism. It's about discontent and unsatisfactoriness. Also, please read this answer and this answer ...


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Excellent logical question however the question ultimately has no relevance because it merely represents the false ideas that have arisen in Buddhism for the last 2000 years or so. In summary: The original scriptures refer to two types of teachings: (i) moral/mundane/kamma teachings for worldly people; and (ii) transcendent/supramundane teachings for ...


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