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In my tradition, the Shambhala line of teachings by Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, ascending to Jamgon Kongtrul and ultimately Milarepa, the "spiritual" and the "material" phenomena are understood to be two narrative explanations of the same underlying reality. So when we talk about supernatural stuff like spirits etc. we always refer to phenomena that actually ...


7

Abhisankhāra-māra - The Karmic force Kleśa-māra, or Ma̋ra as the embodiment of all unskillful emotions. Mṛtyu-māra, or Māra as death, in the sense of the ceaseless round of birth and death. Skandha-māra, or Māra as metaphor for the entirety of conditioned existence. Devaputra-māra, or Māra the son of a deva (god), that is, Māra as an ...


6

Yes, they do know the kamma that lead them there. In fact, the governer in hell (king Yama) is regarded as a nice person who tries to help them recall any of their past good deeds before throwing them away to torture. If they happen to recall any good action, they'll be turned away to be born again in a higher realm. Such an instance is given in Devaduta ...


6

The Buddha talked about the "world Systems" and other humans in them. This is a fascinating topic for myself as someone interested in astronomy. Here are some links speaking about world systems and related topics. The Dhamma is sort of like the laws of mathematics and physics that govern this universe, universal to all sentient beings, everywhere. This is ...


6

Coming together of 31 planes of existance forms an universe. (At least when it is not collapsed.) Likewise there infinite universes1. Also there is view that each universe contains multiple humanoid planets which is called the human plane2. Out of these universes there is only one universe a Buddha can appear. This is called the Mangala Sakwala (The ...


6

In some realms there are some beings who are not aware of their own existence (Some place in Brahma realm). How do their aggregates work when they themselves aren't aware of their existence? Unconscious beings (asannasatta) has consciousness suppressed temporarily until their life span ends. Due to this they cannot be aware of anything including themselves. ...


6

The current Mara was Mara Dusi's nephew back in the days of Buddha Kakusandha. So it seems that there's a waiting list in the Paranimmita-vasavatti heaven. There are some people in the world who do a lot of worldly good deeds, but they dislike and discourage meditation, listening to the Dhamma, getting ordained or anything that has to do with ending of ...


5

From Milindapanha: -- “What is it, Nàgasena, that is reborn?” -- “Mind and matter (namarupa).” -- “Is it this very mind and matter that is reborn?” -- “No, it is not, but by this mind and matter deeds are done and because of those deeds another mind and matter is reborn; but that mind and matter is not thereby released from the results of its ...


5

The traditional Mahayana cosmology allowed for multiple parallel universes, each with at most one Buddha at a time, six realms each. In the pure land system, a pure land is like a parallel universe where you can be re-born, so yes, you can be re-born in a different world, far from Earth, in the traditional cosmology. The various Mahayana sutras often go on ...


5

When a meditator achieves e.g. the 5th jhana of infinite space, is he or she still in this world? Yes, he doesn't disappear. When you sleep, you are not aware of what's happening around you. But that doesn't mean the world is gone. Obviously the body is, but what about the mind? Yes, the mind is still associated with the body. Just that it's focusing ...


5

But now the times have changed "Pali" as a language is dead. Depends on how you define what "dead" means or, the language is dead to whom. To many Pali scholars like Ven. Bodhi, Ven. Thanissaro, Ven. Analayo, etc. Pali is very much alive and they constantly use it as the source reference to their sutta translation works. Thanks to the effort of many ...


4

If you are worried that your current karmic existence is, or is related to, that of a hungry ghost you should apply the proper antidote. In this case the proper antidote is practicing/developing the first paramita : generosity Doing such and being aware of your desires and the desires of others can help curb the feeling of constantly searching for some ...


4

First, it might help to probe the meaning of "supernatural" in the Buddhist context. I think this blog post covers it pretty well. In particular: The very notion of ‘Supernatural’ is one that, it seems to me, arises from Western philosophical assumptions. the basic idea is that there is ‘this world’, which is rational and subject to explanation according ...


4

Yes, various other beings can possess humans e.g. hungry ghosts, Yakṣas, Maras Here's one occasion where a human was possessed by a Mara named Dusi and the Mara being Moggallana himself in that life. At that time, Moggallana was Mara, chief of demons, lord of the lower worlds, and his name was Mara Dusi. He had a sister by name of Kali whose son was ...


4

Five offences in Buddhism which are said to irrevocably propel the offender into hell are: patricide, matricide, killing an Arhat, injuring a Buddha, creating schism in the Sangha Smaller offenses like common murder, adultery etc. can still be "repaired" even if with great difficulties.


4

Did the Buddha have any personal experience with maras and devas and supernatural beings in general? Yes, throughout the suttas and many of the Mahayana sutras, like the Lotus Sutra, it is mentioned the various respledent powers that Gautama Buddha shows but also noteworthy is Buddha's personal attendant Ananda who is able to memorize everything the ...


4

Yayam tanha ponobbhavika nandiragasahagata tatratatrabhinandini, seyyathidam, kamatanha bhavatanha vibhavatanha It is this craving(tanha) which produces re-existence and re-becoming (Punobbhava) and which is bound up with passionate greed’ (Nandi raga sahagatha) and which finds fresh desire now here and there (tatratatrabhinandini) namely (1) thirst for ...


4

Everything is impermanent. What the Brahma enjoys is the Pala or fruit. The fruit of any Karma including that arising from developing the Jhanas also passes after sometime. If you develop the Jhanas they also have a finite duration which you can have them before you loose them. The duration can vary based on past pratice, but as always finite. As in many ...


4

Here's my personal interpretation. A belief in hell, devas, and rebirth preceded (existed before) Buddhism and the Buddha. So when the Buddha was born, lived, and taught, people (non-Buddhists) already had a belief in hell, devas, rebirth, etc. According to the page you referenced (see also Wikipedia's Buddhist cosmology of the Theravada school) there isn'...


4

From the perspective of the old Pali scriptures, I am not aware of anywhere that states: "It is more difficult to achieve nibbana in the a godly realm than in the human realm". For example, AN 4.123 describes Nirvana ("unbound") in the god realms. I think the answer to this common view is based in the type of 'godly' realm. A most common godly realm in ...


4

If the man was a monk, he would eventually be expelled from the monastic order. Similarly, if the man's mind has been consumed by pornography to the point his behaviour is contrary to social norms, he should probably be forbidden from entering the temple. Often, people with addictions cannot be helped, until those people can recognise for themselves they ...


3

According to the Suttas, the Buddha frequently interacted with Devā and Māra. In the Saṃyutta Nikāya, Chapter 1 is "Discourses with Devatās", Chapter 2 is "Discourses with Young Devas" and Chapter 4 is "Discourses with Māra". In general, the Devā and Māra would come and visit the Buddha and the monastics; the Devā to ask the Buddha questions, Māra to try ...


3

I have not heard of such a “Parallel world”. But to know the definition of a "World" according to the lord Buddha; please study Rohitassa Sutta. "I tell you, friend, that it is not possible by traveling to know or see or reach a far end of the cosmos where one does not take birth, age, die, pass away, or reappear. But at the same time, I tell you that ...


3

As I see it, if we assume a linear, unidirectional temporality, it is logically impossible that a prior human existence be necessary for a human existence since there could never be a first existence. Concerning the beginnings of existence, according to, e.g., the Assu Sutta: "A beginning point is not evident, though beings hindered by ignorance and ...


3

They are said to be located from a certain distance from the human realm. ex: The closest heaven to us is the Chaturmaharajika heaven. It is located 42,000 Yojjanas above from the human realm. But the tree devas and certain Asuras/Yakkas also belong to this heaven. The closest hell realm 'Sanjiva' is located 15,000 Yojjanas below the human realm. Refer to ...


3

I was under the impression that the end of buddha sāsana occurs when noble eight-fold path(and the dhamma practitioners) disappear form all the realms including Śuddhāvāsa where only anāgāmins live. Imagine a school where only music prodigies or math prodigies attend, one would never have to worry about the decay of the school's reputation. The Pure Abodes ...


3

In the arupa worlds you cannot hear the Dhamma as you do not have this faculty, also the mental process is too subtle making it not possible to meditate on it. But if you have experiences even the 1st state of sainthood you can progress from here to the final goal. By the way, living in an arupa world would imply in my understanding that it is possible ...


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Je Tsongkhapa. Middle-Length Lam Rim: You should think about the very marvelous way in which any number of sentient beings in the world realms ask different questions all at once, yet he still apprehends them with the wisdom that possesses a single instant of mind and answers all the questions with a single utterance understood in their respective ...


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Did you try Trungpa's Transcending Madness: The Experience of the Six Bardos? Another Trungpa's work that touches similar topics is Glimpses of Abhidharma: From a Seminar on Buddhist Psychology


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