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13

I too had this question for a long time. Then I read Gil Fronsdal's translation of the Dhammapada, which begins (emphasis mine): All experience is preceded by mind, Led by mind, Made by mind. This use of the word experience, where phenomena is often used, is much more accessible. Remember, the Buddha did not say "all phenomena is made by mind"; he ...


9

Citta, Cetasika, Rupa, Nibbana are the four ultimate realities. Everything else is just conventional or conceptual truths. When you see the moon, it's basically the eyes sensing the secondary rupa called Vanna. There's no moon in the ultimate reality. Moon is just what the mind fabricates when rupa meets the eyes. There's consistency because human senses ...


7

what the buddha said about his own karma? The Buddha mentioned that there were 8 past Karma which were effective even after becoming Buddha. See: Why the Buddha Suffered - Apadāna 39.10 but i am not much in karma logic. Karma is one of the things that only a Buddha completely understands. We can only have a rough idea of its operation. I am seeing ...


6

First off, you can't "see things for what they are", because "things" not "are" in any single way. The way things are is always context dependent. As much as we may want to see things from superhuman objective perspective, we can't escape a point of view. Now, if we understand that there is no truly objective point of view then we may get close to seeing ...


6

Suppose you completely empty your mind of all thoughts This is what happens when you go into deep sleep. When you don't dream, the mind falls back to the Bhavanga process. This is called the passive state of the mind. It is what keeps you alive, when there's no other thought. This Bhavanga process is the result of your birth Karma. Suppose that in that ...


6

As Thrangu Rinpoche once said, some people spend a lot of time arguing whether a chair really exists or if it only exists in our minds, but here we are much more concerned with our attitude to the chair. Are we attached to this chair? Do we hate this chair? Do we think we are the chair? Are we free from this chair? That's what really matters in practice, not ...


5

Nibbana is actually best understood as the cessation of suffering. The lakkhanadicatuka for nibbana is as follows (minus proximate cause because it is uncaused): It has peace as its characteristic. Its function is not to die; or its function is to comfort. It is manifested as the signless; or it is manifested as non- diversification. -- Path Of ...


5

I think Nagarjuna's Mulamadhyamakakarika is the work you are looking for. Just like Brahma-sutras does not mention specific Buddhist sutras it debates with, Mulamadhyamakakarika does not mention Brahma-sutras, but it does methodically address the same points. As ancient texts go, Mulamadhyamakakarika is way too obscure to be brought in here and contrasted ...


5

The Pāramitās, are "perfections" or ideals of different wholesome aspects of character that can be worked on (perfected) over the course of many lifetimes. A Buddha has already perfected all of these virtues in previous lives according to Theravada teachings. Just for background information there are 10 Pāramitās in the Theravada tradition: Dāna ...


5

Some scholars, notably Dan Lusthaus, have argued that Yogācāra is not a form of Idealism. Lusthaus is one of the leading living authorities on Yogācāra and author of the authoritative analysis, Buddhist Phenomenology. The charge of Idealism is simply a mistaken reading of Yogācāra. For example in the introduction to his paper, What is and isn't Yogācāra he ...


5

Basically, the Buddhist approach to understanding reality is for each one of us to aim our attention at our individual present moment experience. This is "experiencial reality", meaning we need to experience it to understand it. We really don't need to even read books to understand the Buddhist approach because practicing experiencing present moment ...


4

Gosh, that's a heavy question. All I'll do is point you to some potentially useful material. I suggest you take a look at comparisons between the philosophy of Wittgenstein, and that of Nagarjuna. (Professional analytic philosophers may be knee-jerking like crazy here, but I'll persist.) The central idea that connects them -- if anything does -- is the idea ...


4

Isn't there a story in the commentaries about a monk who had very advanced intellectual understanding of the Buddhist path, and was even a very good teacher of others, and brought many of them to enlightenment, but was not himself enlightened. The story goes that eventually something happened to make that problem clear to him, then he did some stuff -- lived ...


4

From (Chinese) Vajracchedikā Prajñāpāramitā Sūtra: “Subhūti, this is like the body of a person that is tall and great.” Subhūti said, “Bhagavān, the body of a person that the Tathāgata speaks of, tall and great, is not a great body, and is thus called the Great Body.” “Subhūti, for bodhisattvas it is also such as this. If someone says ‘I ...


4

Karma is one of the main teaching in Buddhism. Basically what buddhism teach us is this. We are in a wrong understanding of me. Even thought we thinks there is something called me, the truth is there is no anything called me. (At least there is not a define constant thing) Because of this wrong understanging, we are doing 'things' which were not existed ...


4

Devas are buddhist celestial beings. They don't have to mean aliens. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deva_(Buddhism)


4

If the man was a monk, he would eventually be expelled from the monastic order. Similarly, if the man's mind has been consumed by pornography to the point his behaviour is contrary to social norms, he should probably be forbidden from entering the temple. Often, people with addictions cannot be helped, until those people can recognise for themselves they ...


4

It's not desire that leads to pleasure, it is ("good") action that does. Desire in and of itself is blind, it just wants, craves. Desire does not always translate into good action. Instead, 1) There could be passive frustrating hopeless desire. 2) There could be blind desire that makes you act in self-destructing ways. So desire for pleasure could very ...


4

Yathābhūta is not correct in pali-sentence. We have to put the declension-mark at the end of yathābhūta, such as yathābhūtaṃ, before put it in the sentence. Yathābhūta is adjective/adverb which is not complete, not ready to use, because the properties of word (vibhatti;case-endings;declension): preposition(sambandha), amount(vacana), and gender(liṅga), ...


3

I've experienced some of these issues as well. Before I began a regular meditation and study practice my success at work and in society was much more important to me. Now, quite frankly, it's not important. Work - I work hard in a focused way but I don't try to fit in (using wrong speech) or be seen as a go-getter. I see the benefits of actually not being ...


3

Here is the list of the Buddhist and Hindu Acaryas in chronological order based on their dates and who critiqued whom. Nāgārjuna(1st C.E) critiqued by Vātsyāyana (400 C.E) Vātsyāyana critiqued by Dignāga(500 C.E) Dignāga critiqued by Kumārila bhaṭṭa/Saṇkarācarya(6th-7th century) Kumarila bhatta/Saṇkarācarya critiqued by Dharmakriti (6th or 7th century) ...


3

This is a broad question, perhaps a whole category of questions. Is the world like it is because it was created that way (by a creator God) for some reason? No, Buddhism doesn't accept/teach about a 'creator deity'. What do we know about the creation of the world? Not much: it has "no discernible beginning". What ought we to care about the ...


3

When you say the nature of things i am assuming you mean things being: 1.Impermanent (anicca) 2.Suffering/Dissatisfaction/Dis-Ease (dukkha) 3.Non Self (annatta) 1.Why is the nature of things impermanent? Because conditioned phenomenon is constantly in a state of flux.Why?Because something causes this to happen than this causes that to happen then that ...


3

From Buddhist perspective, phenomenal (experiential) reality is dependently co-arisen phenomena. In other words, experience depends on convergence of a number of factors. Some of those factors are common across multiple cases of perception, and some are specific to an individual case of perception. To the extent that some factors are shared, realities are ...


3

Absolutely, it is possible to be incorrect about the notion that one was on the Buddhist path. I have had plenty of this sort of experience in my own meditation practice. Very frequently I would have unusual experiences in meditation, such as seeing lights, being filled with joy, a sense of time coming to a stop, etc. And I would ask my teacher what these ...


3

Sila grows Samadhi, Samadhi grows Panna, Panna grows Sila. and Paramitas grow the eight fold path, the eight fold path grows the 5 precepts, the 5 precepts grow the Paramitas The human body needs a holistic balance of all its components, and weakness in one can lead to weakness in another, and growing good health by fixing one health problem will ...


3

Any phenomena we know about the world is what we have sensed through our sense faculties. If we cannot sense any phenomena there will be no way we can know about it. The definition of mind is the process to experience and object or phenomena, or to know what is felt through contact. So when you experience something many of what you see is pieced together ...


3

what is the Buddhist explanation? You're reading the Laṅkāvatāra Sūtra. I'd like to mention just in case you don't know already that there are different schools of Buddhism, spread over centuries and continents. They have much in common and later schools evolve from earlier schools. To the extent that they're similar, it makes sense to ask about "the&...


3

I’d just like to add some general comments to your - excellent - question. First of all, your question is not specifically Buddhist. If you take a look at the history of philosophy of science, this is a major problem and has been answered in many different ways. And the greatest philosophers of all times all more or less agree that we cannot have absolute ...


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