10

My answer is from the Shin perspective, I'll let someone else answer for Nichiren. Indeed you're right in saying that there are "two" meanings of Namu-Amida-Butsu - and that for the person of faith, it has a special meaning. However, in Shin, Namu-Amida-Butsu is not a mantra. It is understood within an entirely different framework from that of Esoteric ...


6

This is a Mahayana question and I'll answer it as such. The cosmology of the Amitabha Buddha is described as something akin to an infinite number of parallel universes (or galaxies, the cosmology isn't or wasn't trying to be accurate in the astrophysics), each with a Buddha. The Buddha of each universe arise and disappear to be replaced by a new one, the ...


5

Firstly, what are the 10 directions: "Specifically, the ten directions are the eight directions of the compass—north, south, east, west, northwest, northeast, southeast, and southwest—plus up and down." ref: http://www.sgilibrary.org/search_dict.php?id=2245 Second, sutras that attempt to list and describe the 10 buddhas. http://www.tientai.net/...


5

The founder of Shin Buddhism, Shinran, assumed that a person of shinjin (grounded faith) would naturally be inclined to refrain from harmful actions. These quotes are all from various letters that Shinran wrote: ...When people come to have faith in the Buddha deep in their heart, they genuinely renounce this life, they lament their transmigration in Samsara,...


4

Amitābha Buddha has two attendant bodhisattvas: Avalokiteśvara and Mahāsthāmaprāpta and they all are present in meditations based on visualisation used in the Pure Land Buddhism (as well as in Vajrayana).


3

The notion of Buddhas of the 10 directions is used to depict the first Jewel - Buddha - in some refuge trees. (In the picture below on the left one can see a circle of 10 Buddhas) Some refuge trees instead of 10 might have 3 Buddhas which in turn will depict Buddhas of the three times - Past, Present and Future. Taken together, one can come across a phrase '...


3

Amitabha is a Mahayana concept which needs to rely on another Mahayana framework called Trikaya. With this framework, the historical Sakyamuni Buddha is considered to be the "Nirmanakaya" (created body) while Amitabha Buddha is considered to be the "Sambhogakaya" (reward-body) of the Trikaya. Interesting! So does mahayana buddhism have a considerably ...


3

As far as I know, being a Buddha is not about being a Supreme Being, it is about being enlightened. It is a state of knowledge and detachment achievable by anyone (in theory). Also remember that each school of Buddhism has it's own interpretation of the enlightenment, how to achieve it and of how many Buddhas there are.


3

Intercessory prayer is viewed as, at most, superfluous to the practice of Nembutsu. Practically, Amida is seen as unlimited in his power and scope. Maintaining the Mahayana teaching of sunyata (non-duality), there is no separation between "I" and "Amida". He knows our minds precisely (maybe more) than we do, and feels our suffering as his own. As a limitless ...


3

Taitetsu Unno is a modern day Shin master. In his book "River of Fire, River of Water" he explains the concept of the Japanese equivilent of the concept of "suchness" which is called sono-mama or kono mama simply meaning life "as is" or "just right as it is" through a popular Shin poem: You, as you are, you're just right, Your face, body, name, surname,...


3

It depends on the school and/or the tradition a Buddhist chooses to follow. Just so you are aware, Pureland is really only a "school" in Japan. Everywhere else in Mahayana, a kind of Pureland practice is usually taken for granted, or at least not treated as its own separate practice, like in Chinese Ch'an, for instance. The majority of the Buddhists who ...


2

There are so many confusion regarding Pure Land Buddhism that I feel I must chip in. Many people even see it as non Buddhist because it seems to be about the Amitabha Buddha saving humans through the power of his grace. I am from a non denominational Chinese Mahayana organization with Chan lineage but we also heavily devote to Amitabha and emphasize the ...


2

In the White Lotus Sutra many, many Buddhas, Arhants, Bodhisattva's are introduced. Each Buddha or Buddha to be has their own pure land which is described in very evocative language. For instance Shariputra, one of the Buddha's main disciples in the Pali Canon, is predicted to become the Buddha 'Buddha Flower Grow' in future lives. This Buddha will have a ...


2

Usually the Bodhisattvas who vows to be born back to Earth to guild others will do so with the means appropriate to the culture, time and age. In this age of Dharma descend, they would not display enlightenment or supernatural powers, but instead would display mindfulness of Amitabha Buddha and recitation of His name. They would show signs that they obtain ...


2

Yes, there is other Pure Land in Buddhism other than Amitabha Buddha's. It is called the Pure Land of Lapis Lazuli of the East. The Buddha that resides there is called Bhaisajyaguru Buddha or Medicine Master Buddha of Vaidurya Light. In order to achieve rebirth there, one must practice the recitation of the Buddha's name. For the rest of one's life.


2

From wikipedia: About Pure Land of Pure Land Buddhism: Upon entry into the Pure Land, the practitioner is instructed by Amitābha Buddha and numerous bodhisattvas until full and complete enlightenment is reached. This person then has the choice of returning at any time as a bodhisattva to any of the six realms of existence in order to help all ...


2

From my understanding Gautama Buddha and Amida Buddha are two different Buddha. When Amida made his vows it was immeasurable kalpas ago and He just became Buddha 10 kalpas ago. In the Infinite Life Sutra Sakyamuni Buddha hints that his reason for being born and become Buddha in this life was to announce Amida's great vows so all sentient beings can benefit....


2

I'm not sure if you would like some academic literature but here goes: T’an-luan’s Theory of Two Kinds of Dharma-body as Found in Shinran’s Wago Writings has a detailed description and great diagrams on this topic. The Dawn of Chinese Pure Land Buddhist Doctrine: Ching-ying Hui-yuan's Commentary on the Visualization Sutra


2

Pure Land practice survived only in the Chinese lineage, for only the Chinese Canon has the totality of the Twelve Sections of the Sutras. The other lesser lineage has only one section of the Sutra (Sutta) with large portion missing, could be due to their lack of writing media relied only on oral memorizing. Example, Madhyama Āgama [Wikipedia has most of the ...


1

As for Theravada, Our Gautama Buddha had never mentioned about Amitabha. At the time being, he became a buddha under bodhi tree, he looked up the whold universe finding who he should pay homage or who is better than himself in terms of sila, samadhi and prajna, but unfortunately he couldn't have found one. It means he's the only enlightened one and no one in ...


1

Are Amitabha and Sakyamuni the same? Since this question is not very specific, there are a few ways to answer. (1) Sakyamuni and Amitabha took different paths to become a Buddha. Sakyamuni was Siddhartha Gautama before he was enlightened. Amitabha was Dharmakara before he became enlightened. So from this perspective they are different. (2) Some say that ...


1

What is a sentient being In Classical Chinese Sutra, sentient being is 有情眾生, or simply 有情, a brief translation is one who has feelings, emotional beings. Trees, rocks, mountains... are not. But they can be dwelling places of Devas (Avatamsaka Sutra). I think in between there are marginal or transitory, like bacteria, slug, insect... like a rainbow though we ...


1

I will provide a hint to your question grossly, since I'm running out of time. Provided chance, I shall attend to this question if needed. Some Pure Land masters are popularly quoted as saying that even the unrepentant and evil gain access to Sukhāvatī via niànfó in this very life in which they are criminals or evil men. If you understood the Pureland ...


1

Here is something on Shin, with a bit of discussion on the individual topics -- http://www.nembutsu.info/primshin.htm -- plus this at the very end (emphasis added): Conclusion We urge readers to examine the following essentials because, when viewed in isolation from them, a skewed view of Shin Buddhism will result: the Four Noble Truths; the ...


1

Apart from both being blue, the iconography of the two Buddha's is completely different - different mudras and implements for example. Their "function" is also different. One represents wisdom (Akṣobhya) and the other compassion (Bhaiṣajyaguru). if they are supposedly the same, then why are they so different?


1

Amitabh and Buddha are not the same. Amitabh is the infinite light of revelations , source of innumerable miracles. Buddha discourages display of any miracles.


1

As mentioned before, there are different levels of meaning. The confusion comes from assuming that they are contradictory or exclusive instead of complementary and inclusive. That is, the reality of Amitabha (Đức Phật A Di Đà) and that all appearances are mind only are not opposing views. In fact, they perfectly support each other. For those who naturally ...


1

The primary object of devotion in Pureland Buddhism is Amitabha, but there is secondary devotion to some other figures. I'm not sure if secondary devotion to other Buddhas is common, but Avalokitesvara is usually held in high esteem in Pureland.


1

Short answer, no. Although we revere Sakyamuni, he is not the focus of Pureland. However, the devotion to bodhisattvas is something else. Mainly, there is Kuan Shih Yin Pusa, Ta Shih Chi Pusa, and the rest of the "ocean-wide lotus-pond assembly" of bodhisattvas in the Pureland. While there are other Buddhas in other pure lands, and people have paid ...


1

In Jodo Shu and Jodo Shinshu, Amitabha Buddha is the sole object of devotion, because to be devoted to Amitabha Buddha is seen to be devoted to all the Buddhas, in spirit and practice. Reciting Nembutsu is seen as fulfilling the aspirations of all the Buddhas, including Shakayamuni and Avalokitesvara. From "What Kind of Buddha Is Amitabha?", A ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible