11

1- You are right. The first stage is meant to be (if not easy) at least easier than the others. It is why it is the first, because it is supposed to be what we can do from where we are. 3- It is true. I do not remember the instance, but it happened a long time ago. More recently, I was translating (actually interpreting) Kyabje Ahbay Rinpoche interview with ...


8

Depression is not just a state of mind, it is also a chemical imbalance. And for various reasons (maybe genetical or other) this chemical imbalance will affect some peoples more than others. Therefore we should be careful not to respond by simply pointing logical and scholar facts and reasons that one "should not" be depressive. Having said that, there is ...


8

This meta-topic mentioned the Pañha Sutta, which includes, There are these four ways of answering questions. Which four? There are questions that should be answered categorically [straightforwardly yes, no, this, that]. There are questions that should be answered with an analytical (qualified) answer [defining or redefining the terms]. There are questions ...


7

In my tradition, the Shambhala line of teachings by Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, ascending to Jamgon Kongtrul and ultimately Milarepa, the "spiritual" and the "material" phenomena are understood to be two narrative explanations of the same underlying reality. So when we talk about supernatural stuff like spirits etc. we always refer to phenomena that actually ...


6

In traditional Pali, fear is bhaya-bherava (lit. Fear-Panic), while anxiety is udhacca-kukucca (lit. Worry-Wrongdoing). As I understand from the way these are used in suttas, Fear is defined as an acute sense of danger. It is rather specific, like fear of something coming out of jungle and attacking you. Even if it is uncertain what exactly may happen when ...


6

I suppose the key point here is that, from Buddhist perspective, low self-esteem is considered high self-esteem in disguise -- I've heard numerous gurus' statement's to that regard. If you look up Buddhist definition for "conceit" (if I remember correctly), it says it means considering oneself better, worse, or equal to others. The way Thanissaro Bhikkhu ...


6

The Pali Canon position (e.g. Sedaka Sutta) is that : [Correctly] Looking after oneself, one [implicitly] looks after others. [Correctly] Looking after others, one [implicitly] looks after oneself. The Mahayana position is unquestionably that of service without boundaries. That said, both the Buddha of Pali Canon and the contemporary Mahayana teachers ...


5

A couple of reasons why your practice of catharsis, as described above, might not be considered a favorable thing to do in Buddhism even if you believe it's different enough from gossip to not be considered wrong speech. It brings you out of the present moment and has you re-living or clinging to the past. Let one not trace back the past Or yearn ...


5

My answer is quite opposite of the others. The practice of meditation can improve people's minds. But if someone has severe mental illnesses, such as a deep depression, I would tell that meditation and reflection upon Buddhist teachings should be done carefully. It is possible that dharma can worsen the clinical picture, if it is done unskillfully. I'm ...


5

There are some excellent answers already, so this is only in addition. Excessive individuality automatically produces self esteem issues. Modern Western culture largely prevalent everywhere today is very individualistic. All beings struggle with wanting freedom and also wanting society. One cannot be had without sacrificing the other. Little insects like ...


5

Yes, this is pretty much the way Buddha has led all his conversations with individual students when he was not preaching to groups. In Pali Canon there are many examples of dialogs following same exact model. Buddha's hallmark was to start with whatever assumptions / framework the student had and to show how by staying consistent with the key principles of ...


4

Lord Buddha or Sakyamuni Buddha refers to the condition of depression in the context of the obstacles that people face in realizing their awakened nature. They are called the Five Hindrances, and note depression is specifically mentioned: In the Buddhist tradition, the five hindrances (Sanskrit: pañca nivāraṇa; Pali: pañca nīvaraṇāni) are identified ...


4

The idiom "Fake it until you make it" or the recent turn of phrase "Fake it until you become it" used by Amy Cuddy in a Ted Talk about body posture and how it effects your psychology seems to focus mostly on the concept of confidence: http://www.ted.com/talks/amy_cuddy_your_body_language_shapes_who_you_are In that sense in the west there seems to be an ...


4

Buddhism is about enlightened self interest - to sharpen one's focus onto the important things - and not just the things that are efficient distractions for most people. So, self improvement or societal improvement is definitely not a problem with Buddhism. If you woke me up at my deepest sleep, when I am the groggiest, I am of little use to anyone, until I ...


4

The commentary of Majjhima Nikaya ‘Papancasudani’ says that – “All worldly beings are deranged”, “Sabbe puthujjana ummataka” So even if you get a green light by the contemporary mental health standards, you can still be called a psycho according to Buddhism as long as you are not enlightened. The level of insanity varies from person to person.


4

First, the word "psycho" is actually slang, so it's not proper to use in any intellectual discussion. The word you are thinking of is "psychotic", which technically refers to a person who suffers from or behaviour that stems from a psychosis. The term "psychosis" is very broad and can mean anything from relatively normal aberrant experiences through to ...


4

Yes, various other beings can possess humans e.g. hungry ghosts, Yakṣas, Maras Here's one occasion where a human was possessed by a Mara named Dusi and the Mara being Moggallana himself in that life. At that time, Moggallana was Mara, chief of demons, lord of the lower worlds, and his name was Mara Dusi. He had a sister by name of Kali whose son was to ...


4

When a person has a choice between Path A or B, on what basis would that person make that decision, for it to be the right one? For that one has to have a very good knowledge of the True Dhamma. How can one differentiate between what is the Truth and what is not. Even if there is only one path, there is a lower level and a higher level to it. How would a ...


4

Correct, emotions are complex psychosomatic events, of which vedana is but a small component. For the purposes of liberation, Buddhism differentiates between emotions in their affecting or intoxicating function, and emotions experienced as a result. The first type are called klesha, they are traditionally defined by example, as want, hate, delusion, and ...


4

Perhaps different buddhist traditions lead to different state of nibbana Even within one tradition there are different stages or degrees of enlightenment -- see for example Four stages of enlightenment. I think that this answer implies that the "awakening" which you quoted, i.e. ... According to his book Dropping Ashes on the Buddha, he came to ...


4

There's a passage from the daodejing that I always find appropriate on questions like this. It goes, roughly: When one man hears of the dao, he sets out to embrace it. When another hears of the dao, he is interested, and thinks about it sometimes. When a third hears about it, he laughs out loud at how silly it sounds. If no one ever laughed at it, it wouldn'...


3

This is exactly the kind of dualistic thinking that has to be dropped on the way to enlightenment. "If I'm good, the rest of the world is crazy / and if the rest of the world is good, I must be the crazy one" - this is a kind of emergent-coarising ("if this is, that is, if that is, this is") that you need to figure out in your meditation.


3

This is easily reconciled by understanding that our flaws are all based on our desires. Enlightenment doesn't actually come through desire (though in early stages it may be wrongly pursued in such a way), it comes from the renunciation of desires, which, if you think about it, doesn't take desire to do away with. All it takes is wisdom. paññāya parisujjhati ...


3

From my understanding of Buddhism, there are no memories from beyond. Everything including memories are impermanent. There is no permanent memory-self that remains from moment to moment.


3

"Consciousness" is a word or concept which is not well-defined, for example: Pholosophy of mind Philosophers have used the term 'consciousness' for four main topics: etc. Philosophers and non-philosophers differ in their intuitions about what consciousness is Scientific study Measurement Experimental research ...


3

My answer as a non westerner is: No, low self esteem and insecurity can affect people of all cultures and races throughout history. In fact in Buddhism, the Asuras are gods who despite being quite high up in terms of power in the cosmic scale, are intensely jealous of their inferior status in comparisons to the Devas resulting in a lot of conflicts. They ...


3

Apparently, the Dalai Lama's original encounter with the concept of low self-esteem occurred at a psychology conference that he attended as related by Sharon Salzberg: “What do you think about self-hatred?” I asked when it was my turn to bring up an issue for discussion. I was eager to get directly to the suffering I had seen so often in my students, a ...


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