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we tend to frown upon people who disobey traffic rules I've been taught we might "frown on" bad behaviours but needn't frown on people. So for example I'm inclined to think, "that's bad driving", and not, "you're a bad person for driving that way". I'd tend to frown on and stay clear of dangerous driving. There's a saying, "...


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I have read in one of the suttas , don’t remember where, that one should not lie even for a joke. It makes sense to me because we as Buddhists are married to the Truth. If we start lying then what should we expect from commoners ? Having said that we have the right to remain silent. We can refuse to answer questions especially if somebody’s life is under ...


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There is a lot of utilitarian answers given here, I mean an approval to lie to save a life. If the measure of virtue is to save a life, how about telling a lie to get killed a mass murderer like Hitler? will that count for you all a virtuous act? The all-knowing is free of attachment and doesn't lie. The Buddha is all-knowing (Sabbannuta Nana) and has no ...


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The five precepts are not a gradual training. Buddhists undertake it as the most minimum training in virtue (sila). Followers of Buddhism are expected to undertake the training in the five precepts mindfully (i.e. keeping it in mind) with right effort. If they lapse, they should continue to try their best the next time, without feeling remorse, as this is a ...


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Are breaking traffic rules deliberately and repeatedly a violation of Buddhist precepts and virtues? Is it a violation of Right Action? If one is reckless then it is bad for oneself and for others, if it is antisocial behavior which endangers or rightly annoys other people then it's bad behavior and not conducive to sitting for 7 days & 7 nights in ...


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There was a discussion in medieval Tientai about whether the Buddha was capable of evil - which I assume includes lying - as skilful means. The monks who claimed he was, won the argument. In general, I would advise lying if you really have to, at least in order to keep the other precepts (to save a life is the standard example of a virtuous lie)


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Five things that can’t be done. A mendicant with defilements ended can’t deliberately take the life of a living creature, take something with the intention to steal, have sex, tell a deliberate lie, or store up goods for their own enjoyment like they did as a lay person. -dn33 According to Buddhism situations such as prosecution of the innocent doesn't ...


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