Hot answers tagged

7

There are no Enlightened lies. Fourth precept is the one precept that the Bodhisatta has never said to have broken since he started cultivating Paramita, many Kalpas ago. Four conditions must be met to break this precept The statement must be untrue. There must be an intention to deceive. An effort must be made to deceive. The other person must know the ...


6

In order to understand the precept for lay people, it is useful to look at the rules for monks. For monks, there are four types of edible requisites, according to their lifetime: 1. Yavakalika Solid food; including milk, soya milk, rice milk, etc. This type can only be taken during the morning hours and may not be stored beyond noon of the day it was ...


6

It will depend on the amount of physical work one does, but since you've said you work in an office, I would say one meal a day is enough for maintaining the body healthy if you have no digestive problems. I started having one normal-sized meal per day 2 years ago and I've had no problems. I'd recommend seeing what fits for you by making gradual adjustments. ...


5

Page 55 of this books tells a story about why no garlic http://books.google.com/books?id=91OPcSUTFQ0C&pg=PA55&lpg=PA55&dq=why+prohibition+of+onions+and+garlic+by+buddhist&source=bl&ots=-zabxvpxAT&sig=GLbsLl7P1h6soNNWDG8SXrzfzM0&hl=en&sa=X&ei=GN1OVISdDcz-yQS9q4DgCQ&ved=0CFIQ6AEwBw The text is from the Chanyuan Qinggui ...


5

If lying is the most appropriate thing to do, then developing the heart of compassion for the tormentors, so that they may not add to their evils by killing the victims, and developing the heart of compassion for the victims so that they may be saved, the aspiring Bodhisattva (please read Shantideva's Bodhisattvaharyavitara) may come forward to lie. By ...


5

Becoming sensitive/ kind to all forms of life is the sign you are walking the path :). Deeds speak louder than rhetoric, those clever minds learnt the letters only; true Dharma followers learnt the teachings of Buddha, including the teachings of Karma and Rebirth in Buddha's original meaning. When you treat them with kindness, they return you with kindness. ...


5

The important thing is to start training. Don't dwell on the past. Angulimalla killed a bunch of people and still managed to not let it stop him from reaching Arahantship and your past should't be turned into a hindrance for you. Angulimalla did stop doing stuff he would later regret and just trained. If instead he thought 'i must make amends for ...


4

Is it all a matter of perspective and/or perception? Each of us sees a circumstance from a set of values embedded in our experience & personality. Our culture, spiritual aspirations and social interactions also impose on us group expectations of how we should behave and in some respects what we do or do not say. There is most definitely the capacity to ...


4

We do not have a choice when we are faced with this condition, as we are conditioned being! How ever we act (i.e lie, or not lie) if we have not attained the state of an ariya (one of the 4 noble ones) our views are based on (avijja)ignorance or not knowing, because it is base on self ( us and others). Whatever views or actions that results from avijja are ...


4

Of course lying is sometimes called for. Morality is not about mindlessly following rules, but in seeing beyond our egoic concerns and doing what the situation calls for (Skillful Means). Mindlessly following rules is how cults and death camps get started. Moral guidelines have a place, and more often than not, they should be followed. However, there is ...


4

Fear is considered an unwholesome state, containing as it does aversion (patigha): paṭighacittuppādavasena hi bhāyanaṃ Indeed, fear [arises] due to the arising of a mind accompanied by aversion. -- Vism-T 21.3 (751) So no, there should be no connection between morality and fear. ottapa, often translated as "fear of wrongdoing", is a mind state ...


4

nacca - plays/dances gīta - song vādita - music visukadassanā - visiting shows So yes, it includes all music. Even if you hear a song by chance and you indulge in it, you break the precept.


3

Some killing is unavoidable. To exist is to kill. Gardening involves killing, walking often involves crushing little creatures underfoot. Eating involves much killing (all diets, though some more than others). That does not mean, though, that one has to just throw up one's hands and not bother. One can still minimize impact, certainly avoiding any wanton ...


3

Mr/mrs user73898 There are some people who say, even in the Commentary, that one would not break the precepts by listening to music which tells about the suffering in the world and causes samvega. But (if you are) being honest: isn't most music is not about lamenting (and so is certainly against the precept)? Stay with this answer. Actually it's about ...


3

I think your first doubt was taken out of context from the following rule (excerpt from The Buddhist Monastic Code, page 370): Should any bhikkhu teach more than five or six sentences of Dhamma to a woman, unless a knowledgeable man is present, it is to be confessed. “Then Ven. Udāyin, dressing early in the morning and taking his bowl and (outer) ...


3

Lying is never the correct answer. The answer to this question is explicitly stated in the fourth precept; to refrain from incorrect speech. You lying to "save someone" from some harm or danger will not break them free from the bonds of their karma, all it will do is weaken your own morality, cultivating delusion, aversion, and craving. If someone is to be ...


3

I hope you don't mind a personal story. Perhaps my earliest introduction to any Buddhism would have been my dad reading to me Kim (a novel set in late 19th century India, in which a boy becomes friends and travels with a Tibetan Lama). The other characters are colourful, many of them working for the British secret service and acting against the Russians in ...


3

I guess one possibility is that "steal" is an inaccurate translation, and that a better translation might centre more on the "conceal" and "stealth" meanings of the words (e.g. concealing or taking a scent by stealth, secretly ... and observed only by a deva). Another possibility is that it's taking what is not given: what is given (by lay-people to ...


3

sīlabheda is not a common used term, I don't think. More common is sīlavipatti - transgression of morality. Another is vītikkama - transgression. tattha katamā sīlavipatti? yo kāyiko vītikkamo, vācasiko vītikkamo , kāyikavācasiko vītikkamo -- ayaṃ vuccati sīlavipatti. sabbampi dussilyaṃ sīlavipatti. (dhammasaṅgaṇī, nikkhepakaṇḍaṃ, ...


3

With regard to precepts, one should not kill or encourage others to kill. If one is supplying animals to a slaughterhouse one is encouraging others to kill the animal though one is not participating in the act. So this breaks the present. The conditions for killing are: i) The being must be alive. ii) There must be knowledge that it is a living being. iii) ...


3

we tend to frown upon people who disobey traffic rules I've been taught we might "frown on" bad behaviours but needn't frown on people. So for example I'm inclined to think, "that's bad driving", and not, "you're a bad person for driving that way". I'd tend to frown on and stay clear of dangerous driving. There's a saying, "...


2

Heating juice is allowed; cooking it is not: “I allow reheating.” Mv.VI.17.6


2

In an interview the Dalai Lama says he watched shows like Discovery. He says he does not watch entertainment shows and does not listen to music. He apparently uses television like an educational book. http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/1204/25/pmt.01.html CTRL F type in television in the search box and you will see the interview excerpts. His Holiness ...


2

I think there is a very valid way to see that we practice sila to help get rid of fear! It's as if sila is the instruction, "don't stick your hand in fire," we don't have to follow it because we are fearful of getting burned, but because we are wise in understanding how to properly handle fire without getting burned. What is there to be afraid of? We know ...


2

I have read in one of the suttas , don’t remember where, that one should not lie even for a joke. It makes sense to me because we as Buddhists are married to the Truth. If we start lying then what should we expect from commoners ? Having said that we have the right to remain silent. We can refuse to answer questions especially if somebody’s life is under ...


2

There is a lot of utilitarian answers given here, I mean an approval to lie to save a life. If the measure of virtue is to save a life, how about telling a lie to get killed a mass murderer like Hitler? will that count for you all a virtuous act? The all-knowing is free of attachment and doesn't lie. The Buddha is all-knowing (Sabbannuta Nana) and has no ...


2

Roaches usually come when you drop food pieces on the floor. Killing will break the first precept. So if you see any cockroaches inside, simply chase them out. Do not eat food everywhere. Do it at one place and clean up after. You can use a repellent like Dettol to clean. Close any holes where they can sneak through to your apartment.


2

When I was ordained as a novice monk some 30 years ago, I was given the Dharma name Sila Ananda. In that context, the term "sila" meant "merit," referring to a quality acquired over previous lifetimes. A fundamental cause of confusion occurs when a person assumes that the Buddhist rules of conduct have a purpose similar to the Christian rules of conduct. To ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible