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The prajnaparamita canon is quite ancient going back to 1-2 BCE. It's not clear if the original set of sutras were composed in Sanskrit or Gandhari first and subsequently translated to Sanskrit. (Source: Wikipedia) However the heart (Hṛdaya) sutra, said to be part of the Prajñāpāramitā Sūtra canon, and most famous certainly, is in the view of modern ...


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Maybe because Clinging/Upadana is such a powerful destructive force even advanced practitioners still have a tough time dealing with. So the non-clinging theme reflected thru insight into Emptiness/Sunyata throughout the sutra would be a great way to remind us about it. That's why in many Mahayana temples, this sutra is usually recited at the end of any ...


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Perhaps its terse nature and convenience for chanting (quote from your question) is the exact reason that it is popular. I believe all the Prajnaparamita sutras point to the same thing in the same kind of way. Why wade through the perfection of wisdom in 8,000, 25,000 or even 100,000 lines when you can pop the Heart sutra in your pocket and off you ...


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So I posed this question to my teacher at the temple yesterday, and the answer floored me! I asked her what is the meaning of "No suffering, origination, cessation of suffering, path" in the Heart Sutra, and if it was some kind of crazy wisdom. She replied: "No, this is an understanding of emptiness, that is an understanding that things are caused through ...


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The quote is more or less true. The position that Tibetan Buddhism distinguishes between pāramitāyāna and tantrayāna is accurate. Pāramitāyāna is most often translated 'perfection vehicle' or 'sutra vehicle' while tantrayāna is usually translated as 'tantra vehicle' or 'secret mantra vehicle'. In the Middle Length Lam-Rim, Tsongkhapa says: [Atisha] held ...


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In this paragraph: Postulating the existence of a partless particle that would be truly singular will not work. It would be impossible to ... Having no differentiable sides, ... Such a particle would not be able to ... All the surrounding particles would ... Nothing with any extension could ever come to be. The author is, in my estimation (I have ...


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All of these sutras are on the subject of wisdom, or "voidness", "sunyata", or the "emptiness". Śūnyatā Introduction to Meditation on Voidness (Emptiness). There are many good teachings on the concept; here's one: Advice for Studying Voidness (Emptiness) Every school has its own teachings on the subject. Indeed, all of them (I think) advocate meditation ...


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I don't know much about "official" stance on these, but from what I gather, the main difference between the two is that: "paramitayana" is when you work within a framework of progressive self-improvement, while "tantrayana" is when you work within a framework of the target state. Meaning, with "paramitayana" you first hear about the obstacles, then you ...


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The topic of the Perfection of Wisdom Sutra in 100'000 verses is (1) emptiness and (2) the mind that realizes emptiness. The Heart Sutra is its condensed version. All the Perfection of Wisdom sutras are called “mother sutras” because one achieves any of the three types of enlightenment (that of a sravaka, a pratyekabuddha or a bodhisattva) is obtained in ...


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I've been practicing in a zen dôjô for the last year, and have been singing the haramita shingyo a lot of times without really understanding it. Your question made me look for a translation online, and I found this (for french readers only) whose introduction says,: Ce texte, très court, qui se présente comme le "cœur" des sûtra bouddhistes indiens de la ...


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The first answer is only partly right. The main thing that links these texts is the reference to prajñāpāramitā. They do share the point of view that elements of experience (dharmas) are empty of any self-existence (svabhāvaśūnya). They also seem to be against the tendency to Realism that emerged in the later Abhidharma traditions. Many of the texts are ...


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When the Heart Sutra says "There is no suffering, no cause of suffering, no end to suffering, no path to follow" it isn't saying that none of these things exist. What it means is that none of these things exist in terms of 'Svabhava' which means something like 'intrinsic existence' or 'self nature' or 'essence'. In terms of 'Svabhava' none of these things ...


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If you can spare some money, by all mean please continue to donate to charity. Imagine you were a starving child in some war-torn country, getting a hot meal won't help you attaining enlightenment but it does help relieving a horrible kind of suffering: starvation! Then one can always start with him/herself. Observing the Five Precepts whole-heartedly itself ...


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Not quite on the topic of Kassaka Sutta, but regarding Heart Sutra roots in Pali Canon, one line of thinking traditionally connects the prajna-paramita genesis with Shrenika the Wanderer, also known as Vacchagotta of Pali Canon. Here I will post a couple of relevant quotes: (from Aṣṭasāhasrikā Prajñāpāramitā Sūtra) ... Also, not of body, nor feelings, ...


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This (in Romanised Sanskrit & English) should be of great help : Prajna Paramita Heart Sutra in Sanskrit (prepared by: Dr. Michael E. Moriarty)


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The simple answer is that Edward Conze published a little book with his Diamond Sutra and Heart Sutra translations, and included the Sanskrit text of the Heart Sutra Conze, Edward. (1975). Buddhist Wisdom Books : Containing the Diamond Sūtra and the Heart Sūtra. 2nd Ed. London : George Allen & Unwin. First Ed. 1957. The book seems to be in print ...


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In my opinion, the sutra has no hidden or mysterious purpose. Instead, in my opinion, the sutra is a product of 'bright delusion' or 'white darkness'. The sun provides light to enable people to see. But if people look directly at the sun, their eyes become 'blinded by the light'. Similarly, certain states of samadhi or concentration give rise to 'bright ...


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The Heart Sutra is of utmost importance in Mahayana because it declares the key realization that makes Mahayana distinct from a superficial "Sutra-Yana": That in the ultimate sense all concepts are arbitrary, including even the concepts comprising Buddha-Dharma, that ontological reality behind concepts is by itself free from any discriminations, ...


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The "root" is a passage from the 18th chapter of the MMK: 諸佛或說我 或說於無我 諸法實相中 無我無非我 諸法實相者 心行言語斷 無生亦無滅 寂滅如涅槃 一切實非實 亦實亦非實 非實非非實 是名諸佛法 All Buddhas either speak of self or speak of no self. All dharmas’ true aspect, within this, there is neither self nor no self. All dharmas’ true aspect is defined as mental activity’s and spoken language’s ending.There ...


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In my understanding, in the Pali Canon the Buddha had used the word "Dhammakaya" to refer metaphorically to the body of his teachings. Another term that was used in the same sense was "Dhammasarira" (Dharma-sharira) - playing on the notion of Buddha's cremation relics to refer specifically to the dispersed collection of teachings left after the Buddha's ...


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The Trikaya concept is a Mahayana concept although the origin to the term Dharmakaya could be found in the Pali Canon at SN 22.87: Enough, Vakkali! What is there to see in this vile body? He who sees Dhamma, Vakkali, sees me; he who sees me sees Dhamma. Truly seeing Dhamma, one sees me; seeing me one sees Dhamma."


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The answers above are great, but I want to address two sub-questions specifically. Is this a good high-level view of (introduction to, or taxonomy of) Tibetan Buddhism? It is important to note that Tibetan Buddhism is not mutually inclusive with the Mahayana. That is, "Tibetan Buddhism" are just those forms of Buddhism which trace their lineage from the ...


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Atma doubts that one could accumulate much merits by reading and spreading the Diamond Sutra, but in relation to Dhamma, yes: Iti §100 But! Such is not possible for whom how is certain to stingy to give material things and to say "I do not believe in charity because it doesn't cease suffering in a long term and it doesn't solve any fundamental problems in ...


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I do not believe in charity because it doesn't cease suffering in a long term. This is wrong. Even basic charity has the same exact spirit of compassion as the compassion of Buddha turning the wheel of Dharma. In Jataka stories they say that Buddha did a lot of charity in previous lives before he could become Buddha. The most fundamental form of charity is ...


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Above all, the intention! http://www.accesstoinsight.org/ptf/dhamma/dana/ Many motives, many fruits "Sariputta, there is the case where a person gives a gift seeking his own profit, with a mind attached [to the reward], seeking to store up for himself [with the thought], 'I'll enjoy this after death.' He gives his gift — food, drink, clothing, a ...


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Check this video out. It has the Sanskrit version of the Sutra chanted in some 'Indian accent' and is easier to follow if you understand Sanskrit. The description has the sutra written in the Devanāgarī script and the caption has English and Tibetan translations.


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I'm afraid the answer seems to be, no there isn't. This is somewhat surprising since many Sanskrit Buddhist texts were translated into German.


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Kalapas are sub atomic particles in Buddhism. Also there is a space element between the particles.


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Good question. A couple of thoughts: Do you still have ups and downs? One day you understand everything, and one day you are angry, helpless and miserable? If so, that's a good reason to keep working. There is a difference between intellectual understanding and full realization. When you attain realization, you don't ask questions like "How does one remain ...


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