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There is no awareness beyond the khandhas. There is no such thing as the "Thai Forest Tradition" having a uniform set of teachings. The "Thai Forest Tradition" is just a variety of different jungle gurus who made up their own versions of Buddhism. Ajahn Amaro has wrong view when he said: "that which knows the khandhas is not part of the khandhas". SN 22....


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UPDATE based on the edited question with a suggested definition of karma. While it is true that the Buddha taught that each and every volitional action has specific consequences this is most definitely not in opposition to the fact that repeated actions based on volitional thoughts can be habit forming. Indeed, consequences of a karmic action can be that it ...


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Not clinging to pleasure does not mean there is no pleasure. It is the opposite. The more there is non-clinging, there more there is pleasure. For example, the suttas say the pleasure of 'jhana' ('meditative absorption') is reached by making 'non-clinging' the meditation object (SN 48.10). Or the suttas say Nibbana is the supreme pleasure (Dhammapada 204). ...


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As far as i can tell the delineation of school/sect doesn't really come into play until one plans to join a community for the long term or is in a doctrinal discussion. The various schools have collections of texts, some doctrines therein are non-negotiable whereas a lot of texts will be in a "maybe true maybe not true" category (ie commentary) and the ...


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I'll use the analogy of the Lute Sutta. You hear beautiful music coming out of a lute, a stringed musical instrument. If you break it down into its constituent parts, you cannot find music anywhere. Similarly, reification (papanca) creates the idea of the self, and also the idea of all the non-self things and their relationship to the self. When the ...


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According to the wikipedia page on Samkhya: The earliest surviving authoritative text on classical Samkhya philosophy is the Samkhya Karika (c. 200 CE or 350–450 CE) of Īśvarakṛṣṇa. There were probably other texts in early centuries CE, however none of them are available today. Iśvarakṛṣṇa in his Kārikā describes a succession of the disciples from Kapila, ...


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Last time I had the pleasure of speaking with the Buddha, he said that most of what he teaches he indeed had learned from Alara, but only after having completely realized and verified it in his own direct experience. Before he realized it in his own experience, he could only "pay the lip-service" to the teaching - he could say the right words from ...


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There are several questions brought up here. One I see you asking: is the entire teaching of Buddha- with everything it has to offer -- is a true explanation of reality or is it merely a useful fiction, an expedient mean for achieving a goal (liberation from suffering)? To me the answer is clear. Any explanation of reality is a conceptual model. Every ...


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Puthujjanas love 2 things sensuality being told that they are good people, precisely for craving sensuality. If nobody tells them they are virtuous for craving sensuality, they build a little story in their head where they are good people for craving sensuality. puthujjanas who crave sensuality will tell other puthujjanas who have good items and fame that ...


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Dhammadatu gave an excellent answer that I wholeheartedly suggest you reflect on, but here is something a bit more personal that may also be helpful. For a long time, I had much the same question about Buddhadharma that you have. There was something compelling and wise that struck me about it, but there were also aspects I found puzzling and concerning. It ...


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There are a number of Buddhist schools, mostly falling under the umbrella of Theravada, Mahayana or Vajrayana. Well, Vajrayana is technically under Mahayana too. Zen, Pure Land and so on fall under Mahayana. Tibetan Buddhist schools mostly fall under Vajrayana. You can read about them in Wikipedia and also answers on this site for e.g. from this question. ...


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I have not found suttas talking about ethnicity, but there is a discussion on the caste system (i.e. social class or social stratification), and the capability of every person to fulfill the goals of Buddhism, regardless of their birth (i.e. their background and origin). This can be extrapolated to include racism, especially the verse: Don’t ask about ...


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I like to know the reason for this. Conjecture about [the origin, etc., of] the world is an unconjecturable that is not to be conjectured about, that would bring madness & vexation to anyone who conjectured about it. https://suttacentral.net/an4.77/en/thanissaro In plain english, the reason for this is that these types of questions are not required ...


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If cessation of existence, an abandoning of all being with no fuel for a future is possible, then how is it logically acceptable? You are welcome to try showing how "something turning into nothing" is not a fallacy if you want to try that. There's no proof needed because the premise was already wrong to begin with. There was never really "...


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This question, although seemingly coherent, is a Category Error at its foundation. The “cessation of existence” in Buddhism refers to manifestations of mind, not the ‘dematerialization’ of things inhabiting the objective reality of Science to which the law of conservation of energy can be applied. Whether, or not, there is any relation between the two is an ...


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You're absolutely right that they are only superficially appearing similar, but when you dive deep, they are completely different. This has been discussed in numerous answers, which I will not repeat here - this answer, this answer, this answer, this answer, this answer. The original teachings of the Buddha are systematic (the four noble truths), empirical (...


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Alexander Wynne writes about them in his book, The Origin of Buddhist Meditation. In particular, see chapter 2, which has the following introduction: In some of the earliest biographies of the Buddha, it is claimed that the Bodhisatta was taught the ‘sphere of nothingness’ by Āḷāra Kālāma and the ‘sphere of neither perception nor non-perception’ by Uddaka ...


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Is polytheism dharmic or adharmic? Dhammic If it is dharmic, what is its role within Buddhism? Different level of consciousness leads to different rebirth. If it is adharmic, why is this the case? NA What is the scriptural basis for your answer? There are many suttas with the Buddha encountering Deva (Gods) in Samyutta Nikaya, such as in the Devata Samyutta ...


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OP: QN 1: What is connection between thoughts and habits? The answer for this is given in MN 19: “Bhikkhus, whatever a bhikkhu frequently thinks and ponders upon, that will become the inclination of his mind. If he frequently thinks and ponders upon thoughts of renunciation, he has abandoned the thought of sensual desire to cultivate the thought of ...


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You may as well ask: is the left hand the same as the right hand? Both are part of a greater whole, both work together to tie a knot, sure. But that knot wouldn't get tied if the two hands were the same. When you see a tree, there is you, there is the tree, and there is the awareness that you are seeing a tree. That last is like a knot that you and the tree ...


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It is the people who rely on the commentaries, like [REMOVED BY A MODERATOR], who talk a lot about ''doer'' They say that being enlightened is when there is no doer, instead there is ''pure action'' or ''pure phenomena''. for instance Mahasi quotes this Thus one realizes that feeling itself is what feels the plea- sure associated with pleasant sense ...


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A feature of Buddhism is Noble Silence -- i.e. not getting drawn into speculation (or "unwise attention"). I don't want to complain about the question, but the first paragraph is fiction (referencing the Matrix) and the second is like a "thought experiment" but I don't know what you're saying with it or if it's a metaphor for something -- it appears to ...


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I believe this is one of those questions which we need to make less complicated, rather than more. In my opinion 'dukkha' doesn't take some kind of profound realization. That life is difficult is something that most people intuitively understand, whether or not they've studied Buddhism. The question from that point - life is hard - forward, is how you deal ...


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As i see it, one can't rightfully declare suicide to be a solution to the drudgery of mundane life lest one knows exactly what life is. Saying things like 'life is unjust' ie is quite rediculous because it begets the question what exactly is unjust about it, is the spin of an electron unjust? Is the speed of causality ulucky? Hence when one thinks about ...


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I'd like to hear your views on the arguments on both sides. Anatta: only a strategy for realization or a real "ontological" position? It is both. From Sutta Nipata 4.14: Seeing in what way is a monk unbound, clinging to nothing in the world?" "He should put an entire stop to the root of objectification-classifications: 'I am the thinker.' This ...


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Personnal experience is a good way to learn. From what i understand, buddhism isn't based on blind faith, so experience is an excellent teacher in that sense. Although i won't quote any buddhist text, i don't think you need to see past lives to understand karma. Anyone has experienced hatred, selfishness, and the following results on the mind. Actions born ...


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There's the Milinda Panha. It records a dialogue between the Buddhist sage Nāgasena, and the Indo-Greek king Menandernda_Panha). English Translation available here. It's not considered a core text by all Buddhist disciplines, but it is one of the oldest surviving apologetic dialogues between Buddhism and Hinduism. Another interesting text is the Buddhist ...


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I found the term "panchanga pranama" on the wikipedia page for Praṇāma. In Indian culture and Hinduism, this simply means prostration with five parts of the body touching the ground. In the image above, the left person is doing ashtanga pranama (eight parts touching the ground - also known as full prostration) and the right person is doing ...


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