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Namo -- Homage (perhaps from a root meaning to bend) Tassa -- to him Bhagavato -- usually translated "blessed one" or "fortunate one" Arahato -- I'm not sure whether this means deserving (perhaps deserving of homage) or fully enlightened (see also here) Samma Sambuddhasa -- see SN 22.58; see also the definition for sammā As to origin the ...


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The Buddha invented his own terms and defined them, using everyday words that already existed in the local dialects. First, discussion on the language he used, is found in "The Authenticity of the Early Buddhist Texts" by Bhikkhu Sujato and Bhikkhu Brahmali below. Pali is a constructed language that is closely related to the Buddha's original ...


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This is from the book "Tranquillity's Secret" being published by me on Medium.com: I have only run across this idea, framed from the perspective of one’s comportment towards the events of the world, in a fairly recent revival of the doctrine of “Unconcoctability” (in Pali: Atammayatā) today found in Theravada Buddhism. Part of the reason why it is ...


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The Buddha redefined the term Brahmin : Yassa pāraṁ apāraṁ vā pārāpāraṁ na vijjati, For whom the near shore, the far shore or both do not exist, vītaddaraṁ visaṁyuttaṁ, tam-ahaṁ brūmi brāhmaṇaṁ. free of anxiety, being detached, that one I say is a brahmin. Dhammapada 385


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Atammayata refers to the negation (i.e., "a-") of tammaya, which is identification. It therefore means "non-identification" as used here: MN113:21.7: ‘paṭhamajjhānasamāpattiyāpi kho atammayatā vuttā bhagavatā. MN113:21.7: ‘The Buddha has spoken of not identifying even with the attainment of the first absorption. Identification is ...


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From AN 9.34: Ven: Sariputta: “Reverends, extinguishment (Nibbana) is bliss! Ven. Udayi: “But Reverend Sāriputta, what’s blissful about it, since nothing is felt?” Ven. Sariputta: “The fact that nothing is felt is precisely what’s blissful about it. Sukha or happiness for an unenlightened person is experienced when encountering pleasant feelings (from the ...


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Yes, though Pali is a "dead language" in the sense that it has no native speakers left to use it, that doesn't mean it can't be used to communicate with others. I remember Professor Gombrich mentioning that it got used to communicate by monks who did not have any other common language. You can also find examples mentioned in this thread: can people ...


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There are some topics with answers on discourse.suttacentral.net Pali keyboard on mac os x Insert Pali and Sanskrit Characters with diacritical marks


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Please try: fsnow Pali keyboard which works on Windows. Pali is usually rendered in Roman/ Latin characters with diacritical marks - the same ones used by Sanskrit. Pali doesn't have its own script. However, I think it's possible to render Pali also in the Sinhala script and the Devanagari script (used by Sanskrit). Hence, you can also use keyboards that ...


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The Buddha redefined the term "yañña" (sacrifice), sometimes spelt "yajna" or "yajña". The Buddha discouraged animal sacrifice, human sacrifice, and other extra extravagant ritualistic sacrifices (soma juice drinking etc.), of which I quoted only part of the sutta of AN 4.39 below. The Buddha however praised non-violent ...


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Good householder: To extend a little the answer by good householder Chris. Bhagavato: The Liberal, The (real) Giver, The Liberated One Arahato: Perfect One, Complete One Sammāsambuddho: The rightly Self-Awakened One Meaning: It's an expression of homage and deep gratitude as well great respect (all of what is required to be able to receive his gift, the ...


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I did an in depth research going through a digital search of the pali suttas and compiling a comprehensive list of every type of usage of ☂️ Samādhi: broad umbrella term in every type of usage in EBT. https://lucid24.org/sted/8aam/8samadhi/nuance/index.html


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It's depending on each context of Tipitaka. The question's quote is from this topic, which quoting saṁsaṭṭha from Abhidhamma canon in the section which saṁsaṭṭha meaning "arise together", so it means arise together in that context. It's depending on the canon author's mind while he was writing, not the reader's opinion. And the author's mind appear ...


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According to Bhante Vimalaramsi, "samadhi" was coined by the Buddha. Now, the last factor--I've got a lot to say about that one--"Right Concentration." One of the observations that Rhys Davies made about the word "concentration" (or "samadhi" in Pali) was that that word was never used in the time of the Buddha. The ...


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