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We pay homage to the Buddha by saying ”Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammāsambuddhassa” three times. The widely practiced translations of it take the following forms: “Homage to the Blessed One, the Worthy (Exalted) One, the supremely (fully) Enlightened One!” “Homage to the fully Enlightened One who found the truth about the existence and became free of ...


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Namo -- Homage (perhaps from a root meaning to bend) Tassa -- to him Bhagavato -- usually translated "blessed one" or "fortunate one" Arahato -- I'm not sure whether this means deserving (perhaps deserving of homage) or fully enlightened (see also here) Samma Sambuddhasa -- see SN 22.58; see also the definition for sammā As to origin the ...


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The Buddha invented his own terms and defined them, using everyday words that already existed in the local dialects. First, discussion on the language he used, is found in "The Authenticity of the Early Buddhist Texts" by Bhikkhu Sujato and Bhikkhu Brahmali below. Pali is a constructed language that is closely related to the Buddha's original ...


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This is from the book "Tranquillity's Secret" being published by me on Medium.com: I have only run across this idea, framed from the perspective of one’s comportment towards the events of the world, in a fairly recent revival of the doctrine of “Unconcoctability” (in Pali: Atammayatā) today found in Theravada Buddhism. Part of the reason why it is ...


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one need not take cognisance of anyone else's opinions or group norms, but one can simply decide for oneself what is important and meaningful That's not what I read into it. A question you should consider, one of the yardsticks by which to measure or test a belief ('doctrine', 'quality', or 'behaviour') is whether it is "praised by the wise" and "blameless"...


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There's no such contradiction. Karma can indeed be categorised as prompted and unprompted as in if it was instigated by another or not. What's refuted here is a person or a third party being able to create pain, pleasure or neutral feelings at will. Feelings arise due to contact. Ex: One cannot say "let there be pleasurable feeling at the ear" and make it ...


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Pāli was in oral tradition, so pāli had no its own script. However, pāli can be written by most of the indo-europian script instead. Therefore, the best tattoo in Buddhism is reciting the Sutta in pāli, it is the beginning of all meditations. Anicca is anicca (अनिच्‍च; อนิจฺจ) without number&gender-definition. It is aniccā (अनिच्‍चा; อนิจฺจา), ...


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D.O. is a deep topic that is very hard to understand. Even when someone claims that they understand it, you should take their answer with a VERY BIG grain of salt. In theory my understanding "could" be wrong too. In my defense, I have specifically studied this topic for years, going over much literature, both in Pali Canon and in Mahayana. I also took into ...


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OP: What is the difference between chanda and cetana? Chanda is the desire to act. E.g. if you stand from a seat you have to have the "intention" to do it, but can choose not to if you want A Comprehensive Manual of Abhidhamma Cetana is volition. This is what makes you commit a certain course of action to realise a goal or a wish. E.g. I a feeling hungry ...


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More like 'and deeper than that'. You will find that the majority, perhaps all, lists in the Dhamma are progressions. Each further step if followed opens up the Dhamma further and is closer to the goal: going from minding the body, to minding the sensations, to minding mental states to minding the Dhamma minding the fundamental aspects of the body (earth, ...


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They are basically the same word, though the anta suffix does give it some specific meaning. Remember that the word karma has heavy religious baggage in ancient India every though it simply means action, from the verbal root /kar = "in regards to doing". So kammanta is a way of specifying that one is merely talking about actual mundane action or ...


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You can find this info on the wikipedia page for Indo-European Languages in the form of a family tree below, with Pali and English highlighted with a yellow box. Legend: Green: Language still in use Red: Language extinct White: Categories English is a Germanic language, while Pali is an Indo-Iranian language. Both come under the major family of Indo-...


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The Buddha redefined the term Brahmin : Yassa pāraṁ apāraṁ vā pārāpāraṁ na vijjati, For whom the near shore, the far shore or both do not exist, vītaddaraṁ visaṁyuttaṁ, tam-ahaṁ brūmi brāhmaṇaṁ. free of anxiety, being detached, that one I say is a brahmin. Dhammapada 385


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Clear and short as needed Buddha said, not to take verbatim. Just to praise the benefit of sotapanna. Sometimes one universe metaphorically said like one palm tree, just like that, suffering in long samsara(long, long duration) just compared to seven lifetime(just like a wink of eye) at the most of sotapanna.


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Dhamma is the pali version of the word- In the time of Buddha , there was a conscious decision to record the teachings in Pali rather than Sanskrit. As sanskrit was not accessible to all and created a division between those who has access to it and who were interested in higher knowledge, but Pali was a common tongue in the region. But it is to be ...


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'Sadhu' means good. So you can say 'Sadhu' back. Here in Sri Lanka we commonly say "Theruwan Saranai", which means "May the noble triple gem be your refuge".


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You tagged this question pali. The PTS dictionary does gives two meanings: The soul as postulated in etc. Oneself, himself, yourself. etc. There is for example a chapter of the Dhammapada called Attavagga, whose verses include the word; for example: Attana hi katam etc. Verse 165: By oneself indeed is evil done and by oneself is one ...


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Here is an alternative translation up on Sutta Central: https://suttacentral.net/en/snp2.5 However, the sentence you are looking for is translated as so: Friend, I am not afraid of you, but your touch is evil. The word "evil" here translates Pali pāpako - bad, malignant, evil, wrong, sinful. I suppose the meaning is that, although Enlightened One is ...


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There are two types of Buddhas, depending upon their abilities, one is Samma Sambuddha and other is named as Prakket Buddha, according to Buddhism.. To become a Buddha by doing his own sadhana without help of any Guru or spiritual master is very rare phenomenon and that is achieved by both Buddhas, But what distinguish them is that after enlightment only ...


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Lokīya ñāṇa, as opposed to lokuttara ñāṇa (supramundane knowledge)


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I think there are two rather different words confused here. One is Sanskrit "utpada"/"anutpada" (to arise / not to arise) and its Pali corruption "uppada" with a past form "uppanna". Another one is Sanskrit "upaprajati" (something like "offshoot" or "derivative" - meaning something that is born off a family but separate) and the Pali corruption of its past ...


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Here is a slightly modified B.Thanissaro translation of that passage (etam santam...), with pali + english lined up side by side, nearly word for word order. http://lucid24.org/an/an09/an09-0036/toc-addon/index.html suttacentral.net is an excellent resource, if you configure the settings on there to show pali with english for B.Sujato translations (aside ...


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[1] "When it is said in dependent origination that 'sankhara conditions consciousness', in what way and how does sankhara condition consciousness?" This question is answered by better understanding of the terms themselves: When it is said in the Paticca Samuppada (rebounding conjuration) that "sankhāra paṭicca viññāṇa" (own-making results in consciousness -...


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I don't think the satipatthana sutta is describing a progression. puna caparaṃ is used throughout the Buddha's teaching to connect multiple ideas in a list. For example, in the Mahaparinibbāna Sutta: “pañcime, gahapatayo, ādīnavā dussīlassa sīlavipattiyā. katame pañca? idha, gahapatayo, dussīlo sīlavipanno pamādādhikaraṇaṃ mahatiṃ bhogajāniṃ nigacchati. ...


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From the New Concise Pali English Dictionary: kamma neuter work, occupation; activity, performance. act, deed, action or actions of moral import (producing for the agent an inevitable result or consequence in the same or another life; the action appears to exist in some sense until the effect is completed) an official act of the saṅgha (i.e. an ...


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Yes, though Pali is a "dead language" in the sense that it has no native speakers left to use it, that doesn't mean it can't be used to communicate with others. I remember Professor Gombrich mentioning that it got used to communicate by monks who did not have any other common language. You can also find examples mentioned in this thread: can people ...


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There's one here -- Dhammānussati: Svākkhāto bhagavatā dhammo: sandiṭṭhiko akāliko ehipassiko opaneyyiko paccattaṃ veditabbo viññūhī ti. The Dhamma is well declared by the Bhagavā: visible here and now, immediate, inviting to come and see, effective, to be individually ascertained by the wise. If you use a mouse to hover over one of the coloured words (of ...


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From AN 9.34: Ven: Sariputta: “Reverends, extinguishment (Nibbana) is bliss! Ven. Udayi: “But Reverend Sāriputta, what’s blissful about it, since nothing is felt?” Ven. Sariputta: “The fact that nothing is felt is precisely what’s blissful about it. Sukha or happiness for an unenlightened person is experienced when encountering pleasant feelings (from the ...


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