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Thanks to ChrisW for additional clarifications. In my understanding, this is a reference to a folk poem-turned-proverb popular at Buddha's times about impermanence and the futility of human condition: Yena yenahi maññanti, Tatotassa hi aññathā; In whatever way you think of it It invariably gets otherwise. Here Buddha creatively uses it to emphasize the ...


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From AN 9.34: Ven: Sariputta: “Reverends, extinguishment (Nibbana) is bliss! Ven. Udayi: “But Reverend Sāriputta, what’s blissful about it, since nothing is felt?” Ven. Sariputta: “The fact that nothing is felt is precisely what’s blissful about it. Sukha or happiness for an unenlightened person is experienced when encountering pleasant feelings (from the ...


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Because anyone with even a basic understanding of ecology recognizes that it is literally impossible to live on this planet without your existence causing the death of another creature. Let me ask you this- which is more horrible, the millions of cattle that are slaughtered for beef or the 70 billion creatures that die each year to produce staples like corn,...


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Well it is most certainly based on these passages; Take another mendicant who says: ‘I’ve developed the heart’s release by compassion. I’ve cultivated it, made it my vehicle and my basis, kept it up, consolidated it, and properly implemented it. Yet somehow the thought of harming still occupies my mind.’ They should be told, ‘Not so, venerable! … For it is ...


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The questions are similar in that the existence of self appears to be discussed. In Vacchagotta's question, a nonsensical demand about the question of existence of self is simply ignored as nonsense. However, in the case of the monks, they are simply using the convention "he" as a proxy for "that aggregate known as Pukkusāti". And the ...


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The highlighted translation in the question of "Tassa kā gati, ko abhisamparāyo" as "Where has he been reborn in his next life?” appears questionable or dodgy. "Gati" can simply mean "progress" and "samparāyo" simply means "future" (per Iti 44). Therefore, the question could simply be "what was ...


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The Chan/Zen tradition, for this reason, has always emphasized “special transmission outside the teachings, without reliance on words and letters.” Case 40 in the Mumonkan (Gateless Gate) illustrates this perfectly: When Isan Oshõ was with Hyakujõ, he was tenzo [典座 head cook] of the monastery. Hyakujõ wanted to choose a master for Mount Tai-i, so he called ...


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