14

In Thailand, male novices (called nen or samanera) are a fairly common sight. Very often they have taken vows only temporarily. They may do it during the phansa (rainy season) period, during summer holidays from March to May, or just for a few days in order to make merit when a parent or grandparent has passed away. The latter motivation is in a sense ...


12

A married man need not ask his wife for permission. Even the permission from one's parents was once disregarded by Sariputta (in ordaining Revata). According to the rules (Pāc. 80), though, a woman has to get permission from her husband. This seems to be a carry-over from patriarchal Indian society. I would suggest that in societies where woman are seen as ...


12

Who decides: Often they are coerced into doing it for a short period of time; other places poverty drives them to ordain. In rare cases they do it of their own volition because of some wholesome supporting condition. Eating: Monks can eat technically eat two meals as long as it's in the morning hours from dawn to noon. Most monks fall into that schedule. ...


11

Selling Points According to the Buddha's teaching in the Samaññaphala Sutta (DN 2), there are a whole host of benefits to the life of a samana (i.e. a monk). In brief: Freedom from requirement to engage in secular society (social engagements, civic duties, etc.) Freedom from requirement to engage in secular employment (living as a mendicant means no need ...


11

This is a great question and the answers here (from Bakmoon and Suminda) are wonderful. I'll complement with something from my personal experience. "how can one determine ones decision to ordain, whether it's a strong volition or not" It may be that going forth ultimately is the single thing one can do to know the true nature of his disposition. But since ...


10

I would say to give it a test run. Start keeping the 8 precepts: Panatipata veramani sikkhapadam samadiyami I undertake the precept to refrain from destroying living creatures. Adinnadana veramani sikkhapadam samadiyami I undertake the precept to refrain from taking that which is not given. Abrahmacariya veramani sikkhapadam samadiyami I ...


7

Some times monastic life may not be calm as you think. Also austerity of vinaya will make it harder than lay life incase your have significant attachments. So best is: lean the Vinaya so you do not walk in blindly tame your senses in lay life so you can make your ordained life more productive and live according to the Vinaya Also many monks do disrobe. I ...


6

An explanation (including the origin story) of this rule is given on pages 194 through 195 of The Buddhist Monastic Code II -- The Khandhaka Rules Translated & Explained by Thanissaro Bhikkhu. It says, Eczema covers a wide variety of skin diseases, differing from those included under “leprosy” in that they are not debilitating and do not ulcerate ...


6

Hope this video, "Ask A Monk: How To Ordain As A Monk" by Yuttadhammo Bhikkhu would help you! And hope you will achieve what you want!


6

Page 99 of this account of The Buddhist Monastic Code list 11 types who should not be ordained as bhikkhus, a pandaka (essentially, a eunuch or a person born neuter—see Sanghadisesa 2), a “non-human” being, (this includes nagas, petas, devas, and yakkhas), a hermaphrodite, a person who poses as a bhikkhu without having been ordained, a ...


6

Disclaimer: This is the current knowledge I have on the Theravadin tradition. Here is a summary that answers your question: Becoming a Novice The first part of the ordination procedure for bhikkhus is known as the Going Forth into Homelessness (pabbajjaa). If it finishes with just that — without going on to the Questioning of the candidate and ...


6

I wasn't aware of any Burmese traditions allowing for female ordination; in Burma it has always been seen as a terrible heresy, afaik, with one bhikkhuni actually being thrown in jail. The gist of the main argument against goes as follows: premise: whatever it says in the vinaya pitaka has to be followed to the letter. premise: the vinaya pitaka says that ...


4

If they support you then it is OK. You should ask for support according to their faith and ability. Normally supporters and family are the same words in pali. It is listed in the Metta sutta as family "kulesu", often translated as donors. However, one should live a modest life and ask for only what one needs. Asking for sangha needs is much better. It ...


4

Married people can ordain. Ideally you should get permission from your wife also though not explicitly required. You have to limit the relationship to that of any other woman. I.e, no physical contact or being alone with her no flirting or anything such talk you should not get involved in any of her worldly problem like providing for her though you can ...


4

The Dharmaguptaka school was one of the old 18 to 20 early schools of Buddhism that arose before the arrival of Mahayana Buddhism. Mahayana Buddhism is really just a blanket term we use to refer to groups that started following various new sutras that were written after this period which have an emphasis on Bodhisattva practice and various other new ...


4

The degree of strict interpretation of such rules largely depends on the monastery, tradition and abbot under whom one ordains. Most monastic orders I know adapt these rules to suit their circumstance in practice. In the link you've quoted a reasonable explanation is offered There are bhikkhus who could enter the sangha exclusively to benefit from care ...


4

I live in Asia and i am aware of the situation. Yes it is sad and here is how and why it is happening. The horoscope matter happens because South Asian ideology is dominated by "Astrology". Most of South Asians choose almost everything based on it, child's name,who they are going to marry,their future & etc. Specially Indians are very obsessed in this ...


4

It is as fair as forcing the kids to go to schools, when they refuse. There's usually a probation period as a novice within which they have to prove themselves worthy of monkhood. Even if the parents made the decision based on a horoscope, proper monasteries don't just accept any child unless they see potential for spiritual growth and the Vinaya ...


3

I once listened to the same question being answered by a monk. And here are the answers. (Not the exact words but the long story short.) Lord Buddha never said that Males are better than Females. But as this is India that we are talking about Buddhism had to face some major issues when bringing equality to a country that was dominated by a cast system that ...


3

there's an alternative point of view suggesting that if the Mahapajapati's story is indeed authentic, it postdates the first acceptance of a woman into the Sangha, who could be Bhadda Kundalakesa, and that reluctance of the Buddha concerns specific circumstances of that particular episode and not wholesale refusal of women entrance into the order Bhadda ...


3

The commentary to this rule has some interesting discussion, including an answer to your question: mātāpitaro matā, dārako cūḷamātādīnaṃ santike saṃvaddho, tasmiṃ pabbājiyamāne ñātakā kalahaṃ vā karonti, khiyyanti vā, tasmā vivādupacchedanatthaṃ āpucchitvāva pabbājetabbo. anāpucchā pabbājentassa pana āpatti natthi. In the case where one's mother and ...


3

Yes, such a person can appropriately hold monastic vows in the Geluk tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. There are sleeping restrictions in the Vinaya, but not regarding the time or length of sleep. Although Vinaya states that sleep is an impediment to the three trainings, in any case over-sleeping (are 8 hours of sleep over-sleeping? this is open to ...


3

In my country (Belgium) and I presume in most Western countries, children are of course allowed to follow programs like these. However, a child joining a monastic order is considered controversial as it collides with laws regarding the protection of minors. Also, consider that many other Western religious orders impose minimum age requirements themselves. ...


3

When you become dispassionate in continuing the lay life or when you get enough confidence that you can successfully fend off the temptations of lay life, it is worth considering ordination. I would suggest staying in a monastery or a meditation center first, continuously for about 6 months while keeping to the 8 precepts to see if you can handle it well.


2

An interesting twist is that at least one school of Buddhism does not have monastics but does give Dharma names to lay followers at a ceremony called Affirmation. For example, from: http://bffct.org/bff/resources/shin-buddhism-in-a-nutshell/ In the Shin religion, there are no monastics, monks or nuns, but there are teachers both ordained clergy and ...


2

Yeah, It's not an immoral act to ask for help, especially your parents. You shouldn't become dependent though, but as long as you really need it, there shouldn't be any problem.


2

It all depends on how severe it is. Two things that are of concern are: 1) Is it visible i.e. on the face or other exposed part of the body such that it puts the faithful followers off? 2) Is it serious such that the itchyness interferes with the cultivation of the practice? If answers to those two questions are no then there shouldn't be a problem. I ...


2

Find a place where they can welcome you, stay a few months, practice. Ordaining is not for lifetime for Buddhists, and you may change your mind after a few days/weeks/months/years, that's quite unpredictable, even though you may feel now you will stay a monk forever. No need to know that in advance. I can recommend the temple in Chom Tong, they have an ...


2

There is no problem with it but if gone forth, one would no more participate. The care of the parents is even a task that allows to overstep certain rules and near family a Bhikkhu or Bhikkhuni would be allowed to ask for needed. Practical, especially in SEAsia, the monasteries are in the towns and villages, not so far from home and usually a going forth ...


2

If one was to ordain, would they ever be able to see their friends and family again? The following quote is from the book "The Bhikkhus' Rules A Guide for Laypeople", Chapter: Intimacy - Touching. The last part of the paragraph is interesting. I have highlighted it: "If a bhikkhu touches his mother out of affection, then this is still an offence but the ...


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