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What a Buddhist should do is: Lead a moral life which is beneficial to others and to oneself. Try to develop control over your mind rather than be a slave to it. Try to develop an understanding of the true nature of phenomena and reality (cause and effect) with relation to the psychological impact which cause misery and use this understanding as a leverage ...


4

OK, I'll have a go, based on my (re-)reading of Wallis himself at his "What Is Non-Buddhism?" page. First, I have to say that one possibility is, it's an elaborate joke or hoax. The page says almost nothing substantial, except to offer analogies with non-Euclidean geometry or Laruelle. He says mostly what non-Buddhism is like and what it is not, but very ...


3

As in Yeshe Tenley's answer, the first thing that comes to mind for lay Buddhist are the 5 precepts. Perhaps no country would have a problem allowing this. Except that the first precept may conflict with military conscription (and historically some countries or rulers had a problem with that), so some Buddhist might want to be exempt from military ...


3

Okay, I'm going to take a stab at my own question. Nonbuddhism is a type of "Critical Buddhism" reminiscent of Japanese "Critical Buddhism". It appears to be a reform movement that is highly critical of a variety of elements in modern Buddhism. Unlike the Japanese version of Critical Buddhism, nonbuddhists (or at least Glenn Wallis) seem uncertain if ...


3

It sounds like you're trying to explain consciousness within a framework that supports rebirth to people who understand consciousness in a (materialistic) framework that won't allow for rebirth. Seeing consciousness as tied to an organism and the development of consciousness in an organism leaves no room for the "migration" of consciousness required for ...


3

Yes. There are no restrictions in marrying people of other belief systems.


3

But if we need to prevent a non-Buddhist person from telling lies or going against fourth precept, how can we do. How can we motivate him/her not to lie? I think the whole point in Buddhism is, that you can't change someone else. You can only change yourself. This is dukkha, people are doing bad things even though you're trying to stop them. Keep that in ...


3

Simply ask him whether he likes to be deceived and cheated if some one else did it to him. If someone cannot be trusted would you act on what he says. How comfortable would he be to have to put up or deal with a person who is trying to deceived him. Lies cannot always be kept under wrap and if it surfaces what might happen. This would be a better way to a ...


2

First of all Lord Buddha did not talk about a viññāna that goes from life to life continuously.That kind of explanation is exactly same with the "soul" mentioned in many religions.Lord Buddha dumped that theory and directly said there is no soul. What you have misunderstood is the energy released from a dying person which act as the backup of his or her ...


2

One way self-proclaimed Buddhists identify themselves as such is by taking refuge in the Triple Gem of the Dharma, the Buddha, and the Sangha. Usually when a lay follower takes refuge they are advised to take a vow to follow the five precepts: to refrain from killing to refrain from stealing to refrain from lying to refrain from improper sexual conduct to ...


1

This is out of scope for Buddhism SE. This is more like a history question. The Buddhist texts describe Charvaka as being materialist. Sarva-Darsana-Samgraha describes Charvaka as being both materialist and hedonist, but some scholars (especially Bhattacharya) say there's insufficient evidence to claim that Charvaka was hedonist. The explanation of the ...


1

Meditation is not just about sitting in a certain postures, concentration etc etc. It is about understanding order of things. Meditation implies inwardness i.e. focus on yourself not on others. You yourself are not perfect. How can you ask others to be perfect or follow a path or a percept? Become perfect if not then at least disciplined and people will ...


1

Can a non-Buddhist marry a Buddhist? In the eyes of a non-Buddhist, yes or no, or maybe. Can a Buddhist marry a non-Buddhist or would he / she refrain from marrying a non-Buddhist? He / she would leave the decision to the non-Buddhist. The end decision to him / her would be the same - sun rises from the east, settles at the west. Water flows, birds sing, ...


1

This site is poorly laid out for discussing anything niche or controversial. People who are actually familiar with non-Buddhism get voted down while the dross rises to the top because it is easy, wrong, and confirms the group thought (see 'affective decision'). Non-Buddhism is an operation on x-Buddhist Material, a critique originating out of the ...


1

Non-buddhism is an attempt to unleash the force of x-buddhist (or Buddhisms--plural) thought. The critique sees in all forms of buddhism a refusal to honor its most basic pledge: abetment of liberation. "Buddhism" names a particular means of shoring up the radical potential of Buddhist thought. But it--non-buddhism--wants to avoid becoming just another x-...


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